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By David Horsey | September 30, 2014
One chilly winter evening in 1988, I was the lone journalist among a small clump of voters gathered inside an old meeting hall in Manchester, N.H. I was there, mostly out of curiosity, to witness the spectacle of a man desperately clinging to a shattered dream. The dream was the presidency. The man was Gary Hart. Mr. Hart had once been sure it was his destiny to be president of the United States. The previous spring -- perhaps convinced of his own inevitability and invulnerability and only weeks after declaring his candidacy for the Democratic presidential nomination -- Mr. Hart had taken a ride to Bimini on a yacht called "Monkey Business" accompanied by a young model named Donna Rice.
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NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2013
President Barack Obama told several hundred people gathered at a Baltimore manufacturing plant on Friday that he would keep his administration focused on the economic recovery -- despite a series of political scandals that have rocked the administration in recent days. Obama spoke at Ellicott Dredges in broad terms about lifting the middle class by investing in infrastructure. He pressed lawmakers on Capitol Hill to work together despite partisan gridlock that has stymied progress on economic initiatives proposed by either party, but he offered little in the way of new ideas to address unemployment.  The president spoke to about 800 people at Ellicott Dredges at an event that drew most of the state's elected leaders, including Gov. Martin O'Malley, Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and most of the state's congressional delegation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2013
OK, I know what you're thinking, enough already with the Anthony Weiner mess. But, hey, he was born to inspire Midweek Madness, which he has done again, just as he did last week . This time, Midweek Madness thanks the adorable Kristin Chenoweth for a fresh way to address the scandal.
NEWS
April 15, 1991
There is nothing like a juicy scandal to get the thought waves stimulated and make us pay attention to the news.One by one the gossipy parts of the Nancy Reagan biography are oohed and chuckled over. Did she or didn't she? Did he or nTC didn't he? Oh, the fascination with the foibles of the famous.But, in the end, what does it all prove? Even assuming that most of it is true, what have we learned about Reagan or his presidency that we could not have known before? If as much interest had been paid during the early years of the Reagan era, the history of the last decade, and tomorrow, might have been different.
NEWS
May 29, 1992
Fernando Collor de Mello is the only president Brazil has, the best available and, upon his election two years ago, the first chosen by the people in three decades. He came in on a tidal wave of enthusiasm for youth and free market solutions to the great South American country's daunting problems. Too bad that, one week before the Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro casts the world spotlight on his vibrant and ecologically crucial country, the wheels are coming off his cart.There was the sexual scandal between cabinet ministers, which made his swinging image grist for comedians.
NEWS
By F. Joseph McHugh | June 19, 2001
SILVER SPRING - Montgomery County public school officials announced in May that two teachers at the Silver Spring International Middle School (SSIMS) had given copies of a standardized math test to their students before the exam, prompting a "cheating scandal" that threatens to end the careers of a math teacher and an administrator. The school's principal has been removed and other teachers have been suspended. The predictable parental reaction was outrage. But the target of the anger was the school system, not the so-called cheaters.
NEWS
January 15, 1991
Officials responsible for the scandal surrounding the Maryland State Games have betrayed the public's trust. Outrageous mismanagement and extravagant spending that benefited health department officials, friends and relatives turned a legitimate program aimed at promoting amateur athletics into a self-aggrandizing sham.Health secretary Adele A. Wilzack watched, encouraged and at times approved questionable activities by these officials. She must be held accountable for the Schaefer administration's first scandal.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2012
Sitting at a table in a school cafeteria in Severna Park, Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold didn't look like a politician under siege as he spoke to residents for hours on a recent evening. Leopold nodded agreeably when a pair of longtime supporters bemoaned a planned town house development, offered sage advice to a mother on how to effectively advocate for a school construction project, and with a trademark dose of self-promotion, boasted about not taking a pay raise. Only one person made reference to his indictment less than a week earlier on charges that he directed his taxpayer-funded security detail to perform personal and campaign errands and to arrange frequent sexual encounters with a county employee in parking lots.
NEWS
August 14, 1992
Another in the long string of outrages in this nation's biggest financial scandal -- the collapse of the U.S. savings and loan industry -- was on view last month as members of Congress jockeyed for position to posture once more for political gain on this issue. And posturing seemed to be all these incumbents cared about: No one was remotely interested in the fact that this wheel-spinning is costing taxpayers $6 million a day.If the grandstanding in the House Banking Committee continues through the end of the year, the delay could wind up soaking taxpayers for $1.4 billion.
NEWS
March 10, 1992
Some people just never get the word. With Congress as an institution in increasingly bad odor with the public, some of its leaders refuse to face up to the implications of the Great House Bank Scandal. Dozens, perhaps scores, of House members used what was really just supposed to be a payroll office as a personal, interest-free, unlimited line of credit. Nice perk, considering that their constituents were paying 12 to 19 percent interest for the same service. The so-called bank has been shut down, but an accounting of who abused the system is yet to be made public.
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