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NEWS
July 5, 1994
To be confident of seeing an Orioles game next August, many fans felt compelled to buy their tickets last February. That's the result of two straight seasons of almost uninterrupted sellouts since the opening of Camden Yards. These fans, and thousands of others without tickets, are outraged to see scalpers selling choice seats at fancy markups within yards of the ballpark on game day. So is Orioles owner Peter G. Angelos, who has persuaded the City Council to extend the ban on reselling tickets.
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NEWS
March 6, 2013
The City Council finally had a chance to do something for the average citizen to help them financially, and what do they do? They vote in favor of big business ("Council committee votes to allow Ticketmaster fees," March 1). What a shock! To allow Ticketmaster's unpopular, unnecessary and arbitrary user fees - or should I say "usury fees" - to continue is unbelievable. So the Ravens, the Orioles and some concert and entertainment venues are concerned that Ticketmaster might refuse to handle events in Baltimore.
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NEWS
By Mark Hyman and Mark Hyman,Sun Staff Writer | June 26, 1994
On game days, Peter G. Angelos surveys the streets around Camden Yards and can't quite stomach what he's seeing. Ticket scalpers -- two to three dozen hustling entrepreneurs -- are working the streets, clutching tickets and trying to close the next high-priced sale."
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | September 24, 2009
Fans hoping to see Bruce Springsteen perform in Baltimore in November should be able to buy tickets online Friday for between $31 and $100. But don't blame Scott Culler for being skeptical. The 23-year-old securities analyst from Marriotsville, who'd never seen Springsteen live on stage, was thrilled when similar prices were announced for the May 18 concert at the Verizon Center in Washington. Culler tried to buy four tickets the moment they went on sale Feb 2. But the sale didn't go through.
FEATURES
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,Staff Writer | March 11, 1992
PhiladelphiaThey were all getting in or none of them was getting in.A trio of rock and roll buddies with cash in their pockets and no tickets for the show left Baltimore at 3:12 p.m. yesterday in search of U2."I'll try anything," said Charlie Sank, who was the driver for the road trip from Rossville to the Philadelphia Spectrum and who also uses a wheelchair. "Sometimes the scalpers see I'm in a chair and they won't go so high on the price. I'm getting tickets. I don't go up there with the thought that I'm not getting tickets."
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | August 20, 1999
THAT FEELING -- that ole, empty, August ennui -- settles over you like Saran Wrap at Camden Yards. Especially when the home team, 20 games out of first place, plays a team that's 21 games out of first place. And the home team hits no hits and scores no runs through four innings, then only two to win. And attendance is down by 10,000, an acre of empty seats in the upper deck. Those who come stare blankly into the arena. The vendors look desperate.And Cal's not in the game.And the $13 million-a-year slugger goes 0-for-3.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal and Ken Rosenthal,SUN COLUMNIST | February 14, 1998
NAGANO, Japan -- "Ticket-o! Ticket-o!"Ah, the wonderful singsong of international commerce."Ticket-o! Ticket-o!"The shouts pierce the Nagano air, in American, Canadian, British and French accents.Language differences are overcome. International partnerships are formed. And most important, money is exchanged.Welcome to the ticket-scalping venue.Welcome to the most competitive event of the Olympics."Speed skating! Figure skating! U.S.-Sweden!" cries one scalper."Finland-Czech! Forty-five minutes!
SPORTS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Staff Writer Staff writer Roger Twigg contributed to this article | April 7, 1992
It was the day of the stealth scalpers.They moved in early, stayed as close to invisible as possible and -- wham -- hit their targets hard, charging up to $250 a ticket. And by 1:30 p.m., more than 90 minutes before game time, most of them were long gone, leaving hundreds of would-be customers calling out in desperation for any available seat."There is a shortage of scalpers," said Larry Klein, 29, of Northern Virginia, as he stood on a sidewalk asking passers-by for tickets. "Compared to Memorial Stadium openers, this is ridiculous.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | August 1, 1994
This is what the Orioles should do with the grand or so they drop each game day to pay undercover cops to catch ticket scalpers: Contribute it to a fund for the rehabilitation of drug addicts. Or, if the city wants to assign cops to an additional detail, let them use the Orioles' money to create a few more foot patrols in city neighborhoods. It would be a modest effort, but at least it would combine the Orioles' money and the city's manpower for the greater good. Instead, the city is doing little more than indulging a millionaire's whim.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | July 16, 1993
Somewhere in the Free State of Maryland, there has to be an elected official wanting to step to the plate to protect the interests of all men and women by making a proposal that will shut down ticket scalping.It's unfortunate Charles Carroll of Carrollton, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, who also helped write the Maryland Constitution, had to die in 1852. You just know if he could still be with us he'd come to the aid of his fellow citizens.Ticket scalping is out of control. What's happening at Baltimore Orioles games is a disgrace.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | March 10, 2007
Last Saturday, I got an urge to see college basketball. The Maryland Terrapins were playing North Carolina State in College Park that afternoon. I did not have a ticket. Given my connections, I knew where to turn. I turned to the scalpers - the entrepreneurs who hang around the edges of sold-out sporting events and concerts. They perform the "service" of relieving fans of excess tickets, then reselling them at often-inflated prices. I was about to become a scalpee. I prepared by gathering data and enlisting a compadre, Al Nuzzi, a veteran of such transactions.
NEWS
By MARK MAGNIER and MARK MAGNIER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 28, 2006
BEIJING -- Chinese railway authorities have launched an all-out attack on "yellow bulls" in and around their 5,700 train stations nationwide. While the term evokes some new strain of hoof-and-mouth disease, it is, in fact, a century-old Chinese term for ticket scalpers. "Even the cooks on our trains have been called to the front lines to fight yellow bulls," said Jiang Zhanlin, director of the Railway Ministry's police department. "We're prepared to fight as long as it takes." The Railway Ministry has announced an anti-yellow bull "Blue Shield Action" campaign, in and around Chinese New Year, the busiest holiday of the year, which begins tomorrow.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Brad Kava and Brad Kava,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 23, 2003
SAN JOSE, Calif. - San Jose photographer Jeff Maloney never misses a Jimmy Buffett show, so when good seats sold out for a concert last month at Shoreline Amphitheatre in nearby Mountain View, Calif., before he could buy any, he purchased eight for $880 from a scalper on the popular Craig's List Web site. But when Buffett canceled the show to fly back to Alabama to be with his sick mother, Maloney learned a hard lesson: He thought he had lost all the money he had paid for the tickets. New technologies that let you buy and print tickets online or buy them at a host of auction sites have given buyers more reasons to beware.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | February 17, 2002
They camped overnight in sub-freezing temperatures, enduring snide comments from passersby and neighbors. Finally, Salt Lake City residents got their hands on the limited number of tickets to free nightly concerts. They sat back smugly, watching the eBay prices jump like vintage Enron stock for tickets to Creed, Barenaked Ladies and the Dave Matthews Band at the Olympic Medals Plaza. But just like Enron, the fall has been hard. On the night when Timothy Goebel was skating in the men's figure skating finals, two scalpers stood not far from the Salt Lake Ice Center.
SPORTS
By DAN RODRICKS | January 26, 2001
TAMPA, Fla. - I know the species when I see it - the scalper, the ticket hustler coming around now as the palm tree-lined streets of the Big Guava fill with beautiful people, rock stars and supermodels, veterans of the NFL and their wives, television personalities, movers and shakers from every corner of the corporate America. A red-eyed wink here, a smarmy grin there - the Super Bowl scalper gets their attention, and slips out the question as the beautiful people strut by: "Got any tickets?"
SPORTS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,SUN STAFF | December 29, 2000
There is a small reprieve for those looking to find tickets to the Ravens-Denver Broncos playoff game Sunday. Denver returned about 200 tickets that will go on sale today at 10 a.m. through Ticketmaster. It is one of the few ways a person can get a ticket. The Ravens sold all 2,500 general public tickets on Dec. 21 in 18 minutes, guaranteeing their first playoff game in Baltimore would be a sellout. "If you don't know one of the players and you want to go, you're in trouble," said Kevin Byrne, the Ravens' vice president of public relations and marketing.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | October 16, 1996
It was reported incorrectly in Wednesday's editions that Baltimore police spokesman Agent Robert W. Weinhold Jr. confirmed that officers used their influence to seize Oriole tickets from scalpers and either sold them or used them to attend the games. He confirmed that the officers were under investigation for the allegations.The Sun regrets the errors.Three Baltimore police officers are being investigated for allegedly using their influence to seize Orioles playoff tickets from scalpers and attend the weekend games, according to sources and department officials.
FEATURES
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | October 26, 2000
Despite long odds, both of New York City's major-league teams have made it to the World Series this year, and most of the attention has focused on Mike Piazza, Roger Clemens and the other stars of the diamond. But the first Subway Series since 1956 has called another team into action. New York's police department has been conspicuously, almost militarily, present at the games. Despite the raucous mood of teeming mobs, the cops have kept the peace. NYPD's "arrest processing center" at Yankee Stadium is three full-sized buses, two mobile homes and four vans, all parked within a ring of sawhorses across from the ballpark.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | July 15, 2000
Baltimore Police Commissioner Edward T. Norris changed the department's arrest policy for its Camden Yards ticket-scalping detail yesterday, after reviewing the case of a New Jersey man who was jailed 20 hours for attempting to sell tickets outside the stadium. Norris said a police supervisor will now review each case at the ball park before alleged ticket-scalpers are taken to Central Booking and Intake Center for charging and a bail hearing before a court commissioner. "As a result of this incident ... all arrests at these events will be verified and reviewed by a supervisor on the scene," he said.
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