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By Sylvia Carter and Sylvia Carter,NEWSDAY | June 14, 2000
Edna Lewis, born and raised on a farm in Virginia, is one of my favorite cooks of the last 100 years. Lewis cooked at the fabled Cafe Nicholson in Manhattan, where her chocolate souffles were famous, and at Gage & Tollner in Brooklyn. When I first read Lewis' book, "The Taste of Country Cooking," in 1976, American "regional" cooking had not gained the vogue it was soon to enjoy, and her descriptions of strawberry shortcake and gently fried eggs were glimpses into a past that was fading.
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By Sports Digest | October 21, 2010
Women's college basketball Frese's 2-year-old son Tyler being treated for leukemia Maryland women's basketball coach Brenda Frese said her 2-year-old son Tyler was recently diagnosed with leukemia and is undergoing treatment at The Johns Hopkins Hospital, according to a report in The Diamondback, the student newspaper at the university. "As you can imagine, the initial reaction is pretty traumatic," Frese told reporters at the team's media day Tuesday. Her family's pediatrician diagnosed the disease immediately, which Frese said "pretty much saved his life that day. " Tyler, who has a twin brother, Markus , is doing "extremely well," according to Frese.
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By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Special to The Sun | November 16, 1994
Your taste buds may grow weary of those same Thanksgiving flavors, but give that leftover turkey a fast twist in a rich chowder with a Tex-Mex slant. This soothing soup can basically be called an assembly because you will transform ingredients to a steaming chowder in less than 15 minutes.Creamed corn makes the rich base here with floating turkey cubes along with chunks of tomatoes, green beans and scallions. Of course, this may become such a family favorite you will have to buy a thick slice of roasted turkey breast from the deli to make it year round.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,kate.shatzkin@baltsun.com | August 27, 2008
This recipe for Veggie Pot Stickers is a frugal alternative to takeout. Made with won-ton wrappers, these pot stickers help you use up greens that are about to go bad - spinach or chard can be substituted for the cabbage. But you can't go wrong with cabbage as an inexpensive, nutrition-packed vegetable: It's loaded with vitamin K and vitamin C. Another way to save money is to make several batches of these pot stickers and freeze them for those nights when you're too busy to cook. You'll be prepared to avoid the pricey temptations of the local drive-through.
FEATURES
By Sujata Banerjee | December 15, 1990
THAI RESTAURANT, 3316 Greenmount Ave. Open 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. and 5 to 11 p.m. Monday through Saturday, 5 p.m. to 11 p.m. Sunday. Phone: 889-7303.Baltimore's original Thai Restaurant is arguably its best, providing lightening-fast service whether carrying food out or dining in the pleasant pink room decorated with Thai paintings.The greatest artistry, however, will be found on your plate -- beautifully garnished, crisp-tender combinations of vegetables, meats and spices and none of the heavy, gelatinous sauces that are found in many Chinese restaurants.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 29, 1998
This recipe gives an exotic character to homey root vegetables. An adaptation from Bon Appetit magazine, the dish has been revised to work for our fast-paced schedules and is a meal in itself. The stew, however, is greatly enhanced by a side dish of couscous garnished with toasted pepitas (pumpkin seeds) and scallions.A creamy custard or pudding topped with fresh wedges of oranges makes a great companion to the entree.North African StewServes 41 pound sweet potatoes, skin scrubbed2 parsnips, peeled8 ounces turnips or rutabagas, peeled1 pound boneless skinless chicken thighs, cut into 1-inch cubes1 cup chopped onion2 cloves garlic, minced1 tablespoon fresh ginger, minced1 teaspoon ground cumin1/2 teaspoon cinnamon1/2 cup chicken broth1 (16 ounce)
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | April 20, 2003
During difficult times, when the world situation is tense and uncertain, fancy entertaining is the last thing on my mind. A dinner party of several courses, which would require a good amount of time in the kitchen (not to mention cleanup afterward), or a large cocktail party or reception isn't appealing. What I long for are simple meals shared with good friends. Comfort foods that soothe the palate and the soul come to mind. Stews, potpies, meatloaves and mashed potatoes and just about any kind of pasta top the list of dishes that calm and satisfy.
NEWS
By Ann E Frazier | March 30, 1991
Somehow, for one more Seder, I was ableTo crowd in everyone around the table:Our yearly miracle. Now I standHolding the box of matches in my hand,About to light the candles. But, no, wait.Something is not right, and I hesitateTo strike a flame and to pronounce the blessing.Something is wrong. There must be something missing.What is it I subconsciously detect?I run my mind over the list I've checkeda hundred times or more since I got up:Matzoh, the Seder plate, Elijah's cup,Salt water, wine, eggs, greens, gefilte fish,Haggadahs, scallions, liver and a dishof horseradish, charoseth, juice for children . . .Children.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | March 14, 2004
Weeks after the early days of January, when dieting was on everyone's mind, many of my friends and family are still talking about losing weight. My daughter-in-law is adhering to a low-carb regime. One of my assistants has been on the South Beach Diet for weeks. And my husband, hoping to shed unwanted weight picked up this winter, has been talking about eating more carefully -- a big step for him. Our guests have even hinted that they are monitoring menus. Several days ago, for example, we invited a couple over for last-minute drinks and appetizers on a Sunday night.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff Writer | March 9, 1994
Outside, sleet and snow and freezing rain are piling up in dismal mounds of slush. Inside, chefs Jerry Edwards and David Fusting are performing magic.With a few props, and a little assistance from an observer, they are whipping up a quartet of savory, scrumptious, simply smashing vegetable sauces that light up meat, fish and poultry the way Bastille Day lights up Paris. It's hard to believe that such a flavor wallop can be packed into such a simple package.And there's more: These rich and varied sauces fit perfectly into a healthful diet.
NEWS
By Erica Marcus and Erica Marcus,Newsday | November 7, 2007
Many recipes specifically call for either the white or the green part of the scallion. I have tasted both and can discern no difference. Is there a reason, aside from aesthetics, that a recipe would call for one and not the other? Well, aesthetics isn't nothing; sometimes you just don't want the green. And I'm not sure that there's no difference in taste - I find the green tastes a bit more vegetal, the white more sharply oniony. That said, when the scallion is to be sauteed slowly, I think recipes are justified in specifying "white portion only" because it will melt into a sweet, undefined mass.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | March 14, 2004
Weeks after the early days of January, when dieting was on everyone's mind, many of my friends and family are still talking about losing weight. My daughter-in-law is adhering to a low-carb regime. One of my assistants has been on the South Beach Diet for weeks. And my husband, hoping to shed unwanted weight picked up this winter, has been talking about eating more carefully -- a big step for him. Our guests have even hinted that they are monitoring menus. Several days ago, for example, we invited a couple over for last-minute drinks and appetizers on a Sunday night.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | April 20, 2003
During difficult times, when the world situation is tense and uncertain, fancy entertaining is the last thing on my mind. A dinner party of several courses, which would require a good amount of time in the kitchen (not to mention cleanup afterward), or a large cocktail party or reception isn't appealing. What I long for are simple meals shared with good friends. Comfort foods that soothe the palate and the soul come to mind. Stews, potpies, meatloaves and mashed potatoes and just about any kind of pasta top the list of dishes that calm and satisfy.
NEWS
By Rona S. Hirsch and Rona S. Hirsch,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 11, 2003
Passover Seder guests of Eliyahu Rashid Levieddin can expect to be swatted by spring onions during a holiday song, sample Romaine lettuce dipped in vinegar and dine on celery stew with rice. These are just some holiday traditions Levieddin brought from his native Iran, where he lived until 1979. "It makes me proud to see the customs observed," said Levieddin, a Columbia chiropractor who will celebrate with his wife, Lisa, their five children and friends. "It's important for kids to see how they are passed on."
NEWS
By Susan Nicholson and Susan Nicholson,Universal Press Syndicate | March 18, 2001
Each day of the week offers a menu aimed at a different aspect of meal planning. There's a family meal, a kids' menu aimed at younger tastes, a heat-and-eat meal that recycles leftovers, a budget meal that employs a cost-cutting strategy, a meatless or "less meat" dish for people who may not be strict vegetarians but are trying to cut down on meat, an express meal that requires little or no preparation, and an entertaining menu that's quick. SUNDAY / Family Prepare your own juicy Roast Chicken for the family.
FEATURES
By Sylvia Carter and Sylvia Carter,NEWSDAY | June 14, 2000
Edna Lewis, born and raised on a farm in Virginia, is one of my favorite cooks of the last 100 years. Lewis cooked at the fabled Cafe Nicholson in Manhattan, where her chocolate souffles were famous, and at Gage & Tollner in Brooklyn. When I first read Lewis' book, "The Taste of Country Cooking," in 1976, American "regional" cooking had not gained the vogue it was soon to enjoy, and her descriptions of strawberry shortcake and gently fried eggs were glimpses into a past that was fading.
FEATURES
By Joe Crea and Joe Crea,KNIGHT-RIDDER/TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE | August 7, 1996
Let me share one of my favorite treatments of boneless, skinless chicken breasts. Sauteed apricot chicken with scallions is very simple to prepare yet elegant enough to grace the plates at a dressy dinner party -- but the kids will like it, too.Skinless, boneless breast of chicken has taken on near-luxury status in most markets. The reasons are obvious: the meat cooks in minutes, yielding a fine-fleshed morsel with a mild and delicate flavor that marries so well with a whole range of other ingredients and seasonings.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,kate.shatzkin@baltsun.com | August 27, 2008
This recipe for Veggie Pot Stickers is a frugal alternative to takeout. Made with won-ton wrappers, these pot stickers help you use up greens that are about to go bad - spinach or chard can be substituted for the cabbage. But you can't go wrong with cabbage as an inexpensive, nutrition-packed vegetable: It's loaded with vitamin K and vitamin C. Another way to save money is to make several batches of these pot stickers and freeze them for those nights when you're too busy to cook. You'll be prepared to avoid the pricey temptations of the local drive-through.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 29, 1998
This recipe gives an exotic character to homey root vegetables. An adaptation from Bon Appetit magazine, the dish has been revised to work for our fast-paced schedules and is a meal in itself. The stew, however, is greatly enhanced by a side dish of couscous garnished with toasted pepitas (pumpkin seeds) and scallions.A creamy custard or pudding topped with fresh wedges of oranges makes a great companion to the entree.North African StewServes 41 pound sweet potatoes, skin scrubbed2 parsnips, peeled8 ounces turnips or rutabagas, peeled1 pound boneless skinless chicken thighs, cut into 1-inch cubes1 cup chopped onion2 cloves garlic, minced1 tablespoon fresh ginger, minced1 teaspoon ground cumin1/2 teaspoon cinnamon1/2 cup chicken broth1 (16 ounce)
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | January 7, 1998
If you like rice and salad and tend toward vegetarian meals, try the rice-salad recipe given below. This week's second recipe is for matzo meal rolls.Susan Marie of Forest Hill wrote that she wanted a rice salad that was once printed on an Uncle Ben's rice box. The dish had several different vegetables in it.Her answer came from Doris Wachter of Baltimore, who noted that the recipe -- called pebble salad -- was from a contest sponsored by Uncle Ben's rice.Barbara Waddell of Catonsville requested a recipe for matzo meal rolls.
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