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January 6, 2008
Thomas Scalea is a professor of surgery at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and physician-in-chief at the R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center at the University of Maryland Medical Center. He received his medical degree from Medical College of Virginia. "Bulfinch's Mythology" / by Thomas Bulfinch / Laurel / 448 pages / $7.50 When I was a child, I was a huge fan of both Greek and Roman mythology. "Bulfinch's Mythology" is a complete set of these fables, and I spent hours reading these over and over.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2012
The Wall Street Journal over the weekend used Baltimore and the world-renowned Maryland Shock Trauma Center as the setting for a story saying hospital statistics show gun violence nationwide was “soaring,” and that a continuing national decline in homicides in spite of this trend was improved trauma care. The article doesn't go into city-specific data. But at least in Baltimore, those findings go against most every measure of crime available, and indeed Shock Trauma's own statistics.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2012
The Wall Street Journal over the weekend used Baltimore and the world-renowned Maryland Shock Trauma Center as the setting for a story saying hospital statistics show gun violence nationwide was “soaring,” and that a continuing national decline in homicides in spite of this trend was improved trauma care. The article doesn't go into city-specific data. But at least in Baltimore, those findings go against most every measure of crime available, and indeed Shock Trauma's own statistics.
NEWS
By PETER HERMANN and PETER HERMANN,peter.hermann@baltsun.com | November 28, 2008
Dr. Thomas M. Scalea is tired of calling crashes caused by drivers impaired by alcohol or drugs accidents. Like cancer or heart trouble, the physician-chief of the Maryland Shock Trauma Center views them as diseases. Easily preventable diseases. If you drink, don't drive. If you do drugs, don't drive. "It has a prevention strategy," Scalea says. "They are not accidents. They are preventable and predictable events. The more alcohol you have, the more we can predict you will be involved in one."
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN REPORTER | December 13, 2006
The surgeon received the message on his pager before daybreak: Trooper shot. A horrible but not unheard-of message for the chief of surgery at Maryland Shock Trauma Center, who insists on being notified whenever a police officer or other first- responder falls in the line of duty. But then a nurse called to tell Dr. Thomas M. Scalea more: The victim was Tfc. Eric D. Workman, a man he had befriended eight years ago after Workman ended up on his operating table. The trooper had been struck and nearly killed by a car while on duty in 1998.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | September 12, 2004
It's no surprise that Dr. Tom Scalea likes the documentary about the Maryland Shock Trauma Center that will begin airing tonight on the Discovery health channel. Scalea is physician-in-chief at the world-renowned trauma center and the film, The Critical Hour: Shock Trauma, makes the doctor and his staff look good. Very good. That may be because the award-winning filmmakers, producer Susan Hannah Hadary and director William Whiteford, are University of Maryland employees. The pair works for Video Press, a facility that is part of the University of Maryland School of Medicine.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | March 11, 2007
A big yellow "Welcome Back Trooper Eric Workman" sign remained on display in front of the Westminster barracks on Route 140 last week. But the detective did not dwell on the special treatment he received his first days back on the job. Maryland State Police Trooper 1st Class Eric D. Workman, 36, went back to work, executing search warrants for armed robbery and identity theft suspects. "We're just amazed at how much he's jumped back into it, and then we're not," said Sgt. Doug Reitz, who works with Workman in the barracks' criminal investigation division.
NEWS
By PETER HERMANN and PETER HERMANN,peter.hermann@baltsun.com | November 28, 2008
Dr. Thomas M. Scalea is tired of calling crashes caused by drivers impaired by alcohol or drugs accidents. Like cancer or heart trouble, the physician-chief of the Maryland Shock Trauma Center views them as diseases. Easily preventable diseases. If you drink, don't drive. If you do drugs, don't drive. "It has a prevention strategy," Scalea says. "They are not accidents. They are preventable and predictable events. The more alcohol you have, the more we can predict you will be involved in one."
NEWS
June 6, 2008
Shock Trauma team to help quake victims Three doctors, a nurse and an engineer from Maryland Shock Trauma Center plan to travel to China today to help treat victims of the May 12 earthquake that devastated the central part of the country. The team plans to help doctors at West China Hospital, a huge, modern facility in Chengdu - about 50 miles from the quake's epicenter - where more than 2,000 quake victims have been treated. Dr. Thomas Scalea, Shock Trauma's physician in chief, said he and his colleagues offered to help soon after the earthquake struck.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | March 29, 2004
Medical gloves have come a long way since the 18th century, when they were made from the intestines of sheep - and only partially covered the doctor's hand. Today, they're carrying out high-tech germ warfare. Although they look, feel and even smell like ordinary medical gloves, a new design that could be on the U.S. market by the end of the year emits a gas that's safe to humans but deadly to everything from HIV to E. coli. All the new glove needs to start working is a little ambient light.
NEWS
June 6, 2008
Shock Trauma team to help quake victims Three doctors, a nurse and an engineer from Maryland Shock Trauma Center plan to travel to China today to help treat victims of the May 12 earthquake that devastated the central part of the country. The team plans to help doctors at West China Hospital, a huge, modern facility in Chengdu - about 50 miles from the quake's epicenter - where more than 2,000 quake victims have been treated. Dr. Thomas Scalea, Shock Trauma's physician in chief, said he and his colleagues offered to help soon after the earthquake struck.
NEWS
January 6, 2008
Thomas Scalea is a professor of surgery at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and physician-in-chief at the R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center at the University of Maryland Medical Center. He received his medical degree from Medical College of Virginia. "Bulfinch's Mythology" / by Thomas Bulfinch / Laurel / 448 pages / $7.50 When I was a child, I was a huge fan of both Greek and Roman mythology. "Bulfinch's Mythology" is a complete set of these fables, and I spent hours reading these over and over.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | March 11, 2007
A big yellow "Welcome Back Trooper Eric Workman" sign remained on display in front of the Westminster barracks on Route 140 last week. But the detective did not dwell on the special treatment he received his first days back on the job. Maryland State Police Trooper 1st Class Eric D. Workman, 36, went back to work, executing search warrants for armed robbery and identity theft suspects. "We're just amazed at how much he's jumped back into it, and then we're not," said Sgt. Doug Reitz, who works with Workman in the barracks' criminal investigation division.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN REPORTER | December 13, 2006
The surgeon received the message on his pager before daybreak: Trooper shot. A horrible but not unheard-of message for the chief of surgery at Maryland Shock Trauma Center, who insists on being notified whenever a police officer or other first- responder falls in the line of duty. But then a nurse called to tell Dr. Thomas M. Scalea more: The victim was Tfc. Eric D. Workman, a man he had befriended eight years ago after Workman ended up on his operating table. The trooper had been struck and nearly killed by a car while on duty in 1998.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | September 12, 2004
It's no surprise that Dr. Tom Scalea likes the documentary about the Maryland Shock Trauma Center that will begin airing tonight on the Discovery health channel. Scalea is physician-in-chief at the world-renowned trauma center and the film, The Critical Hour: Shock Trauma, makes the doctor and his staff look good. Very good. That may be because the award-winning filmmakers, producer Susan Hannah Hadary and director William Whiteford, are University of Maryland employees. The pair works for Video Press, a facility that is part of the University of Maryland School of Medicine.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | March 29, 2004
Medical gloves have come a long way since the 18th century, when they were made from the intestines of sheep - and only partially covered the doctor's hand. Today, they're carrying out high-tech germ warfare. Although they look, feel and even smell like ordinary medical gloves, a new design that could be on the U.S. market by the end of the year emits a gas that's safe to humans but deadly to everything from HIV to E. coli. All the new glove needs to start working is a little ambient light.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | March 26, 1998
A state trooper died yesterday after a traffic accident on Baltimore-Washington Parkway in Prince George's County, state police said.The accident occurred as Trooper Raymond G. Armstead Jr., 27, who was assigned to the Forestville Barracks, drove north on the parkway about 12: 30 p.m. Several people clustered at a minor traffic accident near Powder Mill Road flagged him down, and Armstead began to pull over.Armstead looked toward the people on the shoulder, said Col. David B. Mitchell, superintendent of the agency, and didn't see that traffic was stopped ahead.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | March 1, 2002
The chief physician at Maryland Shock Trauma Center denied yesterday that his staff discriminated against a gay man who claims he was barred from his partner's deathbed because he was not "family." Dr. Thomas Scalea said staff members blocked William Robert Flanigan Jr. from the 10-bed resuscitation unit for more than six hours Oct. 16, 2000, because doctors were too busy trying to save his partner's life to allow any visitors, who might have gotten in the way. "That evening was extremely busy," Scalea said at a news conference.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | March 26, 1998
A state trooper died yesterday after a traffic accident on Baltimore-Washington Parkway in Prince George's County, state police said.The accident occurred as Trooper Raymond G. Armstead Jr., 27, who was assigned to the Forestville Barracks, drove north on the parkway about 12: 30 p.m. Several people clustered at a minor traffic accident near Powder Mill Road flagged him down, and Armstead began to pull over.Armstead looked toward the people on the shoulder, said Col. David B. Mitchell, superintendent of the agency, and didn't see that traffic was stopped ahead.
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