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NEWS
September 10, 2006
On September 8, 2006, after a brief illness, Grace Scaggs M-BM- Entombment Private.M-BM- In lieu of flowers, expressions of sympathy may be directed in Grace's memory to the Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, Center for Digestive Disease, 4940 Eastern Avenue, Baltimore, MDM-BM- 21224 &/or the Maryland Republican Party, 15 West Street, Annapolis, MDM-BM- 21401.M-BM- Arrangments-LEMMON FUNERAL HOME OF DULANEY VALLEY INC. 410-252-6000. M-BM-
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2011
Naida B. Scaggs, a longtime Baltimore County elementary school educator, died June 16 of pancreatic cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. She was 65. The daughter of a chemist and a homemaker, Naida Burkholder was born in Baltimore and raised on East 32nd Street. After graduating from Eastern High School in 1963, she earned a bachelor's degree in 1967 in elementary education from what is now Towson University. She later earned a master's degree in education from what is now Loyola University Maryland.
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NEWS
March 26, 2005
On March 23, 2005, TIMOTHY ANDREW SCAGGS, II, beloved son of Timothy A. Scaggs, Sr. and Teresa M. Dixon, loving grandson of Linda and Owlen Scaggs, Jr., great-grandson of Delores "Mommy Scaggs", dear nephew and godson of "Aunt Carla" Scaggs, and Brian Hughes. Cousin of Lauren, Owlen, IV, and Gannon Nephew of Owlen "Uncle Owie" Scaggs and Robin Scaggs. Step-son of Miss Bette Scaggs. Also survived by his step family: Thomas and Miss Cookie Graham, Harry and Nanny Lynch. Mass of Christian Burial in St Jane Frances Church on Monday at 11 AM. Interment in Crestlawn Memorial Park.
NEWS
September 10, 2006
On September 8, 2006, after a brief illness, Grace Scaggs M-BM- Entombment Private.M-BM- In lieu of flowers, expressions of sympathy may be directed in Grace's memory to the Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, Center for Digestive Disease, 4940 Eastern Avenue, Baltimore, MDM-BM- 21224 &/or the Maryland Republican Party, 15 West Street, Annapolis, MDM-BM- 21401.M-BM- Arrangments-LEMMON FUNERAL HOME OF DULANEY VALLEY INC. 410-252-6000. M-BM-
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | March 15, 1997
What's in a name? In Scaggsville, you can find a controversy.Upscale newcomers to this southeastern Howard County community don't like planting their roots in a locale with a name that lacks panache.It's an age-old development battle: newcomers vs. old farm families."When I say that I'm from Scaggsville, they ask me how many cows live here," says Stephanie Lopez, a college freshman who grew up in the the Cardinal Forest subdivision.Adds Nia Bain, a Cherry Creek resident: "It sounds like the boonies."
NEWS
February 19, 2004
On February 17, 2004 ELIZABETH J. TULACEK (nee Suchanek), age 93 years of Olney, MD formerly of Baltimore, MD, beloved wife of the late Dr. Rudolph S. Tulacek and devoted mother of Janet E. Scaggs and son-in-law H. Selby Scaggs Jr., of Silver Spring, MD; loving grandmother of H. Selby Scaggs III and wife Jessica of Silver SPring, MD and Michael M. Scaggs and wife Shirley of Charlestown, WV; great-grandmother of H. Selby IV, Abigail Janet, and Mary Elizabeth;...
BUSINESS
By Liz Steinberg and Liz Steinberg,SUN STAFF | May 19, 2002
Scaggsville may no longer be the farmland that the Scaggs family settled in the 1830s, or the 15-person town the Maryland Gazetteer reported in 1941, but homeowners say they enjoy the country quiet of the community nestled in the Howard County portion of Laurel. Not actually an incorporated city, Scaggsville comprises a number of quaint neighborhoods, including Willow Tree, Hammond Village and Cherry Tree. Its borders generally are considered to be Johns Hopkins Road to the north, east to Interstate 95, a little west of Route 29 and south to the Rocky Gorge Reservoir.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 6, 1999
SAN FRANCISCO -- The heroin that killed singer Boz Scaggs' son on New Year's Eve is a potent form that during the 1990s has lured more people from various walks of life into using a drug once associated only with skid row junkies.In years past, when street-grade heroin was 3 percent to 5 percent pure, injecting it was the only way to get high.But during the past decade, purity has shot up to as much as 50 percent or 60 percent, while the price has fallen to as little as $40 a gram.The result: More people have been willing to snort and smoke it.While those methods don't produce as strong a high, they are less intimidating.
NEWS
June 29, 1996
Howard I. Scaggs Jr., 74, savings bank chairmanHoward I. Scaggs Jr., chairman emeritus of American National Savings Bank and a civic activist, died Wednesday of cardiac arrest at Greater Baltimore Medical Center.He was 74 and lived in Timonium.In 1946, Mr. Scaggs began his 43-year career with the bank, which was formerly known as the American National Building and Loan Association. He was elected a director in 1953, also serving as president from 1961 to 1985 and chairman from 1968 to 1989.
NEWS
April 13, 1997
No wonder no one can find ScaggsvilleAfter reading the March 15 article in The Sun, "Seeing Scaggsville as Nowheresville," we find it interesting that for the first time in the recent past, a newspaper has defined the boundaries for Scaggsville and even given brief directions to the location off the interstate.Perhaps if this had always been the case, people who bought homes and relocated to a desirable location would not have asked the big question, "Who are we and where do we live?"We have seen the Howard County Public Safety Complex, which was built on the site of the demolished Scaggsville School, described in newspapers as being in Fulton, North Laurel, south of Columbia and north of Burtonsville.
NEWS
March 26, 2005
On March 23, 2005, TIMOTHY ANDREW SCAGGS, II, beloved son of Timothy A. Scaggs, Sr. and Teresa M. Dixon, loving grandson of Linda and Owlen Scaggs, Jr., great-grandson of Delores "Mommy Scaggs", dear nephew and godson of "Aunt Carla" Scaggs, and Brian Hughes. Cousin of Lauren, Owlen, IV, and Gannon Nephew of Owlen "Uncle Owie" Scaggs and Robin Scaggs. Step-son of Miss Bette Scaggs. Also survived by his step family: Thomas and Miss Cookie Graham, Harry and Nanny Lynch. Mass of Christian Burial in St Jane Frances Church on Monday at 11 AM. Interment in Crestlawn Memorial Park.
NEWS
February 19, 2004
On February 17, 2004 ELIZABETH J. TULACEK (nee Suchanek), age 93 years of Olney, MD formerly of Baltimore, MD, beloved wife of the late Dr. Rudolph S. Tulacek and devoted mother of Janet E. Scaggs and son-in-law H. Selby Scaggs Jr., of Silver Spring, MD; loving grandmother of H. Selby Scaggs III and wife Jessica of Silver SPring, MD and Michael M. Scaggs and wife Shirley of Charlestown, WV; great-grandmother of H. Selby IV, Abigail Janet, and Mary Elizabeth;...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison | June 12, 2003
IT SEEMS, at a certain point, the thing to do. xxLinda Ronstadt did it back in the '80s. Throughout the '90s, Natalie Cole did it. Although he should have stayed far away from it, Rod Stewart just couldn't resist. And Aaron Neville will do it later this summer. After years of pushing their voices over wailing guitars, funk-seasoned grooves or overblown pop arrangements, some music vets feel the need to "get deep" and interpret the American Songbook once the hits dry up. Some folks pull it off (Linda and Natalie did at first, but both singers eventually drove the formula into the dust)
BUSINESS
By Liz Steinberg and Liz Steinberg,SUN STAFF | May 19, 2002
Scaggsville may no longer be the farmland that the Scaggs family settled in the 1830s, or the 15-person town the Maryland Gazetteer reported in 1941, but homeowners say they enjoy the country quiet of the community nestled in the Howard County portion of Laurel. Not actually an incorporated city, Scaggsville comprises a number of quaint neighborhoods, including Willow Tree, Hammond Village and Cherry Tree. Its borders generally are considered to be Johns Hopkins Road to the north, east to Interstate 95, a little west of Route 29 and south to the Rocky Gorge Reservoir.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 6, 1999
SAN FRANCISCO -- The heroin that killed singer Boz Scaggs' son on New Year's Eve is a potent form that during the 1990s has lured more people from various walks of life into using a drug once associated only with skid row junkies.In years past, when street-grade heroin was 3 percent to 5 percent pure, injecting it was the only way to get high.But during the past decade, purity has shot up to as much as 50 percent or 60 percent, while the price has fallen to as little as $40 a gram.The result: More people have been willing to snort and smoke it.While those methods don't produce as strong a high, they are less intimidating.
NEWS
April 13, 1997
No wonder no one can find ScaggsvilleAfter reading the March 15 article in The Sun, "Seeing Scaggsville as Nowheresville," we find it interesting that for the first time in the recent past, a newspaper has defined the boundaries for Scaggsville and even given brief directions to the location off the interstate.Perhaps if this had always been the case, people who bought homes and relocated to a desirable location would not have asked the big question, "Who are we and where do we live?"We have seen the Howard County Public Safety Complex, which was built on the site of the demolished Scaggsville School, described in newspapers as being in Fulton, North Laurel, south of Columbia and north of Burtonsville.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | April 8, 1994
SOME CHANGEBoz Scaggs (Virgin 39489) Even though the music isn't as stylish or slick as it was when he recorded "Silk Degrees," the Boz Scaggs we hear on "Some Change" doesn't seem to have changed very much at all. His voice is just as tart and plaintive as it was 18 years ago, peaking in a tremulous falsetto and flavored with a slight Texas twang. Even better, he gets the most out of it in the 10 songs here, evoking heartache and loneliness with the tender strains of "Lost It," soulful intensity with "Sierra," and casual confidence with the laid-back drawl of "I'll Be the One."
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