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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2011
Doris J. Roseborough, a retired Small Business Administration executive supervisor, died Nov. 15 of an aneurysm at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The longtime Ashburton resident was 73. The former Doris Richardson was born in Essex, N.C., and moved with her family to South Baltimore. After graduating from Carver Vocational-Technical High School in 1956, she earned a bachelor's degree in 1961 from Morgan State University. Mrs. Roseborough worked for the Small Business Administration in Washington as an executive supervisor for 31 years before retiring in the mid-1980s.
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BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2013
The Great Gourmet is Kimberly Scott's way of introducing the world to Maryland seafood. Her Eastern Shore company sells crab cakes, oysters and clams to wholesale and retail markets. In 2006, just three years after opening, The Great Gourmet was logging $1.8 million in revenue. Three years after that, Scott had revenue of $3.8 million, 15 employees and a place on Inc. Magazine's 500/5000 fastest-growing companies list. With her company expanding, Scott turned to Richard Loeffler at the Eastern Region Small Business and Technology Development Center at Salisbury University in 2009 for advice about a small-business loan that would allow her to move from rented space to a building of her own in Federalsburg with more freezer space.
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BUSINESS
By Patrick Rossello | October 15, 1990
BECAUSE banks often shy away from high-risk loans to small businesses, the Small Business Administration stepped in to fill the gap. The SBA has a number of tools to help your company obtain a loan. The federal agency even has one that is available specifically to support an international trade contract.Years ago, the SBA made direct loans to small businesses, but this became a heavy budgetary burden. Except for one small program, the direct SBA loan activity was discontinued and the SBA expanded its loan guarantee efforts.
EXPLORE
April 22, 2013
Eric E. McLauchlin, of Shaffer, McLauchlin & Stover in Bel Air, has been selected as the 2013 Maryland Attorney Advocate of the Year, the U.S. Small Business Administration's Baltimore District Office announced. McLauchlin was honored April 19 at the 29th Annual Maryland Small Business Week Awards Luncheon at Martin's West in Woodlawn. The awards luncheon, which an estimated 500 people attend, is recognized nationally by SBA as an outstanding event celebrating National Small Business Week.
NEWS
By John Fritze | May 13, 2008
Baltimore is one of 11 cities that will take part in a Small Business Administration program that will provide management training and other programs to 20 inner-city businesses, city and federal leaders said yesterday. Small businesses, which will be accepted first come, first served, will receive up to 80 hours of trainingthis year on topics such as organizational management and market development. The training will be free, SBA officials said. "Having this support will help them to establish their goals," said Mayor Sheila Dixon.
BUSINESS
October 7, 1991
One on One is a weekly feature offering excerpts of interviews conducted by The Evening Sun with business leaders. Catherine Borden Killian is the regional administrator for the U.S. Small Business Administration for the Mid-Atlantic Region and oversees all SBA programs and policies in Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia and Washington.Q.As the recession is ending, what issues are critical to small businesses, particularly in the Mid Atlantic region?A.There are always issues that are critical to a small business and one of our regional priorities is to increase our loan volume.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | February 4, 1998
Buoyed by a strong economy, the head of the U.S. Small Business Administration said yesterday that her agency is committed to lending a record amount of money this year.The SBA will aggressively seek out minority and women business owners for that assistance, Administrator Aida Alvarez said at a news conference in the downtown offices of the SBA's Baltimore District to discuss the agency's proposed fiscal 1999 budget.The total budget proposed for the SBA in fiscal 1999 is $724.4 million, a 1.16 percent increase.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 30, 1997
WASHINGTON -- To many Republicans and Democrats in Washington, the Money Store could not have a better name.In the past 15 years, it has been not only the nation's largest lender of loans backed by the Small Business Administration (SBA), but one of the biggest campaign donors in the industry.The company and its executives have contributed and raised more than $400,000 for Republicans and Democrats over the past two years.In the same period, Money Store Investment Corp. has persuaded lawmakers and Clinton administration officials to block a regulation that senior career officials at the SBA say would reduce the likelihood of a huge taxpayer bailout, should the economy turn sour, and with it the Money Store's fortunes.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | May 19, 1998
The U.S. Small Business Administration signed an agreement yesterday with three minority business groups, sealing a pledge to quadruple lending to African-American business owners, and tripling lending to Hispanic firms by fiscal year 2000.As part of the agreement, the National Black Chamber of Commerce, the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and the Minority Business Enterprise Legal Defense and Education Fund are to market the SBA's goals to minority business owners in its networks."We have to be forward thinking and find ways to open the door and provide opportunities to Hispanics and African-Americans," said SBA Administrator Aida Alvarez from Washington in a telephone conference call with reporters.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | April 16, 1999
The federal Small Business Administration signed up the NAACP's Community Development Resource Center in Baltimore yesterday to become a part of its effort to quadruple lending to blacks by 2000.In a news conference at the Baltimore headquarters of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, the SBA and the civil rights organization designated the center as a prequalification loan intermediary.As an intermediary, the center will provide free lending services. They include:Reviewing business plans and credit reports to determine qualifications for the SBA program.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2012
Like any construction firm hoping to break into government contracting, Linwood Scott's company needed to obtain a surety bond - a type of insurance - in order to win its first job. But getting the bond, which is required for contracts worth more than $100,000, can be a challenge for small businesses such as Scott's Baltimore-based LCSJ Construction. Underwriters prefer to work with companies that have completed similar jobs or are large enough to sustain major losses if a project falters.
NEWS
By Jason Judd | March 12, 2012
If our largest banks are the "one-percenters" of American capitalism, small business is our 99. And, just as our largest corporations are ruling the roost in Washington, so too do they rule in Annapolis. In fact, Maryland's politics have become so lopsided over the last decade that support for Maryland's small businesses has degenerated into a mere talking point - "backbone of our economy," "the engine of economic growth," etc. Here's Exhibit A. In spite of all the talk from big business groups about taxes and regulation in Maryland, the top issue for small businesses is lending.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2011
Doris J. Roseborough, a retired Small Business Administration executive supervisor, died Nov. 15 of an aneurysm at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The longtime Ashburton resident was 73. The former Doris Richardson was born in Essex, N.C., and moved with her family to South Baltimore. After graduating from Carver Vocational-Technical High School in 1956, she earned a bachelor's degree in 1961 from Morgan State University. Mrs. Roseborough worked for the Small Business Administration in Washington as an executive supervisor for 31 years before retiring in the mid-1980s.
NEWS
By Michael K. Wyatt and James C. Howard | November 7, 2011
In his Sept. 8 speech on jobs, President Barack Obama repeated the conventional wisdom that small businesses create most new jobs. Like a lot of conventional wisdom, this does not fully capture the real dynamics of the situation. A 2010 article published by three University of Maryland economists led by John Haltiwanger revealed that when they controlled data for the age of a company, there was no indication that small companies outperformed large companies in creating new jobs. The key factor was age: new start-up companies were the vehicle for generating new jobs.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2011
When banks rejected their loan and credit applications, Christine Cochrum and Rachel Costello financed the expansion of their Federal Hill spa with the only capital they had access to: their retirement accounts and credit cards. "We ended up having to pool our resources," Cochrum said. "We made the leap that way. " Now a community nonprofit group hopes to ease frustration of the sort experienced by Cochrum, Costello and other local entrepreneurs by offering low-cost financing targeted to immediate business needs.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2011
Feb. 7 is the deadline for those seeking disaster loans for damage resulting from the Nov. 17 tornado that tore through Parkville and north Baltimore. The U.S. Small Business Administration is offering homeowners, renters, businesses or nonprofit organizations with insured losses low-interest disaster loans before insurance settlements are made, according to a new release from the Baltimore County Fire Department. For those who are unsure how much of the loss will be covered by insurance, the SBA will consider making a loan for the total loss up to its loan limits, as long as the borrower agrees to use insurance payments to reduce or repay the loan, the release says.
BUSINESS
By Robert Manor and Robert Manor,Chicago Tribune | August 30, 2006
CHICAGO -- The new head of the Small Business Administration, a former executive at a decidedly big business, says his agency must do a better job of helping minority, rural and inner-city small companies grow. "That's a huge social opportunity for us," said Steven C. Preston, who became the SBA's administrator in June. Preston is taking on a small agency with vocal critics who claim that too many federal contracts are going to giant businesses when they should be allocated to small companies.
NEWS
By Michael K. Wyatt and James C. Howard | November 7, 2011
In his Sept. 8 speech on jobs, President Barack Obama repeated the conventional wisdom that small businesses create most new jobs. Like a lot of conventional wisdom, this does not fully capture the real dynamics of the situation. A 2010 article published by three University of Maryland economists led by John Haltiwanger revealed that when they controlled data for the age of a company, there was no indication that small companies outperformed large companies in creating new jobs. The key factor was age: new start-up companies were the vehicle for generating new jobs.
NEWS
By Larry Williams | March 21, 2009
Four and a half years ago, Martin Haft took a deep breath, borrowed $150,000 from a bank in Carroll County with a Small Business Administration guarantee and opened Walk About Shoes, a specialty shoe store in Westminster. The store was the only one in the county with a wide range of shoes designed to meet medical or special size needs, and business grew briskly. Today, Mr. Haft finds himself beleaguered, in need of cash to buy inventory in the midst of a major economic decline. If he can't find the money he needs, there is a good chance that his shoe store will disappear, leaving an empty storefront and three people, including Mr. Haft, jobless.
NEWS
By John Fritze | May 13, 2008
Baltimore is one of 11 cities that will take part in a Small Business Administration program that will provide management training and other programs to 20 inner-city businesses, city and federal leaders said yesterday. Small businesses, which will be accepted first come, first served, will receive up to 80 hours of trainingthis year on topics such as organizational management and market development. The training will be free, SBA officials said. "Having this support will help them to establish their goals," said Mayor Sheila Dixon.
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