Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSayre
IN THE NEWS

Sayre

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 23, 2003
On July 16, 2003, in Camarillo, CA, JAN THOMAS SAYRE, beloved husband of Martha J. Sayre (nee Romesburg); dear father of Christina and Joseph Sayre, dear step-father of Ian Bonds; dear son of Emily and Doug Jones, and the late Jasper Sayre; devoted brother of David Sayre, Christopher, Jon and Ben Jones. Friends may call at the family owned Mitchell-Wiedefeld Funeral Home Inc., 6500 York Rd (at Overbrook) on Tuesday 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 P.M. A Funeral Service will be held Wednesday 7 P.M. at Govans Presbyterian Church.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2013
On Saturday, comic book stores across the country are giving away free comic books in an effort to promote the genre and to support individual comic book stores. This year, an estimated 4.6 million free comic books will be given out at stores across the country. One store participating is Gorilla King Comics, at 1711 Aliceanna St. in Fells Point, owned by Ian Sayre. Sayre, 38, opened the store about a year ago. "We love comics," he said. "Gorilla King Comics is a very classy place at which to buy one's comics.
Advertisement
NEWS
July 1, 1993
James E. Riesbeck, 50, a Corning Inc. executive who led the redevelopment of the Watkins Glen International race track, died Monday after undergoing treatment for a heart ailment at Robert Packer Hospital in Sayre, Pa.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2013
A Baltimore comic store has joined the growing public outcry over DC Comics' decision to hire a gay-marriage opponent and author to write part of the coming "Adventures of Superman" series. Joining many shops nationwide, Gorilla King Comics in Fells Point will not sell the two issues expected to be written by Orson Scott Card. "I have a lot of gay customers," says owner Ian Sayre. "I don't want someone to come in here, see that and think that's me or that anyone in the store supports his policies.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | December 8, 1998
Western Maryland College almost lost a sophomore to alcohol poisoning last month, after a young woman drank more than 20 shots of bourbon in a competitive drinking bout, college officials said.The incident occurred at an unauthorized, unsupervised party in a fraternity clubroom on campus, officials said. The clubroom is in a dormitory."In my time here, there has never been such a serious, life-threatening situation," said Philip Sayre, now in his 15th year as dean of student affairs.The student was disciplined, and the local fraternity, Gamma Beta Chi, and local sorority Alpha Nu Omega have lost "virtually every privilege," Sayre confirmed yesterday.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | December 4, 1997
The buzz around Western Maryland College the past month and a half has been about the student who got drunk in a fraternity hazing, then crashed a car into a vice president's front porch.But the college's Greek organizations want to set the record straight -- he's not one of theirs and they don't want the whole flap to give fraternities at the Westminster campus a bad name.The incident involved a small underground fraternity called "Preachers," which lost its charter about 15 years ago.Its members never reapplied, choosing to remain independent of the college, according to Philip Sayre, vice president and dean of student affairs.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Hanah Cho and Athima Chansanchai and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | November 19, 2003
A McDaniel College dean is promising that the school's judicial system will consider disciplinary action for a "disturbing incident" that began with racial slurs and ended with one student hospitalized. Campus officials and Westminster police are investigating a fight that broke out at the Westminster school after a charter bus trip to a Baltimore nightclub. Westminster police say they are investigating the matter as a hate crime. "I don't think any student should be subjected to verbal abuse," Philip Sayre, the college's dean of student affairs, said yesterday.
NEWS
By Elisabeth Orr and Elisabeth Orr,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | August 31, 1997
The first time Joanne Sayre sang with Dan Aitken and Tricia Duke, she knew they had something special."Our voices just melded together. It was effortless," she said. She had been in bands before, but this group took "minimal effort."Duke, the group's soprano, agrees. "We communicate without words," she said. "It's like some kind of magic."The contemporary Christian band formed of that melding, Piece Offering, recently released its first compact disc, "Come Home," which is available in religious bookstores.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFf | June 18, 1998
The search continued yesterday for a retired scientist from Beltsville Agricultural Research Center who has been missing since June 10 when a sightseeing boat capsized near the Galapagos Islands off Ecuador.Richard Sayre, 80, and Diane Sayre, 70, were thrown from the 70-foot Moby Dick when it hit a rough swell and pitched four of its 15 passengers into the Pacific Ocean. The accident killed two people and left two missing at sea and feared dead.Rescuers found Diane Sayre's body, but were looking yesterday for Richard Sayre and another passenger, Lyon Zeisler, 75, said Stephen Richards, president of Elderhostel Inc., the Boston-based company that sponsored the trip.
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Staff Writer | December 27, 1992
Ever seen a green steak?You probably never will. But in the figurative sense, the choice cuts from Lawrason Sayre's Angus herd bear the universal color of environmental protection.Since 1987, the 65-year-old Churchville farmer has been converting his traditional beef-cattle operation to one based on a feeding technique used extensively in New Zealand. The technique, called "rotational grazing," helps protect Mill Branch and other sensitive streams that lace through his Waffle Hill Farm and flow toward the Chesapeake Bay.Mr.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2010
Frank A. "Frankie" Sayre, a lifelong salesman and freelance bartender, died June 28 of cancer at his West Baltimore home. He was 63. For the past 20 years, Mr. Sayre had been a salesman with Reliable Churchill LLP in Baltimore, wholesale distributors of wines and distilled spirits. Mr. Sayre was born and raised in Chicago, where he graduated from John Marshall Harlan High School. An accomplished trombone player, he received a music scholarship at Arkansas A&M, which he attended for several years.
NEWS
By TED SHELSBY | May 7, 2006
About 20 years ago, Lawrason Sayre made a key change in the way he runs his 300-acre beef cattle farm near Churchville. On a visit to New Zealand, Sayre observed how farmers there get most of their feed from pastures planted in clover, alfalfa and orchard grass. At the time, Sayre raised his grain - primarily corn - to feed his cattle, a practice that requires significantly more fertilizer, herbicides and pesticides than grass. "Those New Zealand farmers had a theory: Make the livestock work for us, not have us working for them," said Sayre, 79, who runs Waffle Hill Farm with his son, Ned. "When you're growing corn for silage, we're doing all the work."
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Hanah Cho and Athima Chansanchai and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | November 19, 2003
A McDaniel College dean is promising that the school's judicial system will consider disciplinary action for a "disturbing incident" that began with racial slurs and ended with one student hospitalized. Campus officials and Westminster police are investigating a fight that broke out at the Westminster school after a charter bus trip to a Baltimore nightclub. Westminster police say they are investigating the matter as a hate crime. "I don't think any student should be subjected to verbal abuse," Philip Sayre, the college's dean of student affairs, said yesterday.
NEWS
July 23, 2003
On July 16, 2003, in Camarillo, CA, JAN THOMAS SAYRE, beloved husband of Martha J. Sayre (nee Romesburg); dear father of Christina and Joseph Sayre, dear step-father of Ian Bonds; dear son of Emily and Doug Jones, and the late Jasper Sayre; devoted brother of David Sayre, Christopher, Jon and Ben Jones. Friends may call at the family owned Mitchell-Wiedefeld Funeral Home Inc., 6500 York Rd (at Overbrook) on Tuesday 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 P.M. A Funeral Service will be held Wednesday 7 P.M. at Govans Presbyterian Church.
TRAVEL
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun Staff | October 24, 1999
On the south side of Bethlehem, Pa., the train whistle blows in the middle of the night. I turn over and go back to sleep. An hour or so later, another train whistle blows. The ghostly sound is not so much an interruption as it is an accompaniment to my dreams. It's understandable why Robert Heysham Sayre, chief engineer of the Lehigh Valley Railroad, would want to build his Greek revival-style mansion on Fountain Hill, so close to the sooty and mighty enterprise he worked for.The Sayre Mansion was the first house erected in the wealthy neighborhood on Fountain Hill.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | December 8, 1998
Western Maryland College almost lost a sophomore to alcohol poisoning last month, after a young woman drank more than 20 shots of bourbon in a competitive drinking bout, college officials said.The incident occurred at an unauthorized, unsupervised party in a fraternity clubroom on campus, officials said. The clubroom is in a dormitory."In my time here, there has never been such a serious, life-threatening situation," said Philip Sayre, now in his 15th year as dean of student affairs.The student was disciplined, and the local fraternity, Gamma Beta Chi, and local sorority Alpha Nu Omega have lost "virtually every privilege," Sayre confirmed yesterday.
NEWS
By TED SHELSBY | May 7, 2006
About 20 years ago, Lawrason Sayre made a key change in the way he runs his 300-acre beef cattle farm near Churchville. On a visit to New Zealand, Sayre observed how farmers there get most of their feed from pastures planted in clover, alfalfa and orchard grass. At the time, Sayre raised his grain - primarily corn - to feed his cattle, a practice that requires significantly more fertilizer, herbicides and pesticides than grass. "Those New Zealand farmers had a theory: Make the livestock work for us, not have us working for them," said Sayre, 79, who runs Waffle Hill Farm with his son, Ned. "When you're growing corn for silage, we're doing all the work."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.