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NEWS
June 10, 1991
A saxophonist is nothing without a signature sound. John Coltrane had his, so did Paul Desmond. And so did Stan Getz, 64, who died Thursday. "His sound was incredible," said pianist Kenny Barron. "He was one of the last of the masters whom you could recognize by the first few notes."Stan Getz received his initial training in Jack Teagarden's biband, then graduated to Woody Herman's Second Herd, where he became one of the celebrated Four Brothers in the saxophone section. The 1948 recording of the ballad "Early Autumn" established Stan Getz's warm, lyrical styling, yet a few years later he was a man on the run.A failing marriage, a heroin bust, problems with alcohol and law, a suicide attempt, six months in a California jail, an auto crash that almost killed one of his sons, a near-fatal case of pneumonia.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2014
Abraham "Al" Baitch, a musician recalled as one of Baltimore's finest saxophone players, died March 24 at Northwest Hospital after suffering a fall. The Pikesville resident was 89. During his 70 years in the local entertainment scene, Mr. Baitch was a fixture at nightclubs, where his onstage antics earned him the nickname "Madman. " He headed the house band for WJZ-TV's "The Buddy Deane Show" in the 1950s and 1960s. "We played everywhere, from The Block to the French Embassy in Washington," said John Baxter, a piano player who worked alongside Mr. Baitch for 42 years.
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NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | March 11, 2005
THE MUSIC plays on. Al "Madman" Baitch, 80 years old, assures this yesterday morning as he bounces from his car toward Miller's Deli at the Greenspring Shopping Center, defying every lurking pneumococcus in the morning chill, and also defying the odds. His career is entering the springtime of its 65th year. He wears a brand-new pacemaker, which will have to learn to move to the rhythm of the Madman. Baitch goes back to weekend nights atop Keith's Roof, where guys wore zoot suits and the dancing was interrupted only by the fights.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 26, 2014
Charles Franklin Deem Jr., a military hospital administrator and retired Air Force major, died of pancreatic cancer Jan. 3 at Gilchrist Hospice Center in Towson. The Dundalk resident was 65. Born in Baltimore and raised on Louth Road in Dundalk, he was the son of Charles Deem, a Bethlehem Steel employee, and Kathryn Deem, a homemaker who also served as a Glenn L. Martin Co. riveter. He was a 1965 graduate of Dundalk High School and earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in business and personnel administration from Antioch University.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | March 29, 1998
Nobody ever said Rowland E. Pilling couldn't jam with the best of them.He could wail his saxophone for the most raucous version of "You Are My Sunshine" one moment, then tone it down the next to a somber rendition of "Harlem Nocturne." And with each, he achieved the feeling he desired to evoke from the listener.Mr. Pilling, 75, a Maryland native and resident of Rosedale who died Thursday of lung failure at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, played saxophone solo or with accompaniment in and around Maryland for nearly 50 years.
NEWS
August 21, 1998
In an article in Wednesday's Today section, two members of the Dave Matthews Band were misidentified. Boyd Tinsley is the violinist, and Leroi Moore plays saxophone.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 8/21/98
NEWS
September 25, 1994
Mattie Moss Clark, 69, a shining light of gospel music who directed choirs, wrote songs that became classics and turned her five daughters into the famed Clark Sisters gospel group, died Thursday in Southfield, Mich., after a long illness. Among the gospel classics the Detroit resident wrote are "Climbing Up the Mountain," "I Thank You Lord (For Being So Good To Me)," "I'm Going to Heaven To Meet The King," "He Abides" and "Salvation is Free."Forrest C. "Bud" Sagendorf, 79, a cartoonist who drew the comic strip "Popeye" for 46 years, died Thursday of brain cancer in Sun City Center, Fla. He was the assistant to "Popeye" creator Elzie C. Segar, who began the strip in 1929 under the title "Thimble Theater."
NEWS
November 15, 1990
Services for Irvin N. Dashiells, a musician and retired jewelry salesman, will be held at 11 a.m. today at the Leroy M. and Russell C. Witzke Funeral Home, 1630 Edmondson Ave., Catonsville.Mr. Dashiells, who was 78, died of cancer Monday at his home on Hartmont Road in the Catonsville area.He retired in 1974 after many years of selling jewelry, which he would take to customers' homes.He taught music, played saxophone and led bands after being certified as a saxophone teacher by the Kaspar School of Music while still in his teens.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2014
Abraham "Al" Baitch, a musician recalled as one of Baltimore's finest saxophone players, died March 24 at Northwest Hospital after suffering a fall. The Pikesville resident was 89. During his 70 years in the local entertainment scene, Mr. Baitch was a fixture at nightclubs, where his onstage antics earned him the nickname "Madman. " He headed the house band for WJZ-TV's "The Buddy Deane Show" in the 1950s and 1960s. "We played everywhere, from The Block to the French Embassy in Washington," said John Baxter, a piano player who worked alongside Mr. Baitch for 42 years.
NEWS
January 2, 2003
Edward Gough Jr., 76, band leader, saxophonist Edward Gough Jr., a local band leader and saxophone player, died of a heart attack Dec. 26 at Sinai Hospital. He was 76 and lived in Park Heights. Mr. Gough led the Eddie Gough Band, a jazz quartet that appeared in area clubs and hotels from the 1960s to the 1980s. He played more recently with other groups. "It was a big act for years," said Ruby Glover, a singer who occasionally performed with Mr. Gough's band. "He was just a delightful entertainer."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2013
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra opened its 2013-2014 season Friday night with a burst of sax and violence. Of particular note was the U.S. premiere of the Saxophone Concerto by eminent American composer John Adams, who has given the small repertoire of concertos for that instrument a huge boost with this half-hour work. Co-commissioned by the BSO, the Saint Louis Symphony, Sao Paulo Symphony and Sydney Symphony (which gave the world premiere last month with the composer conducting)
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2013
Edward Henry Weiss, a retired marketing executive who put the name Wacky Noodle on a children's flotation device used in swimming pools, died of a stroke Monday at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The Timonium resident was 74. Born in Brooklyn, N.Y., he was the son of Sidney Weiss, who owned a printing business, and the former Fannie Brand, a homemaker. As a student at Abraham Lincoln High School, he played the saxophone and clarinet in the school band. He befriended a classmate, a young composer and performer, Neil Sedaka, who wrote hits including "Breaking Up Is Hard To Do. " "In the summer my husband and Neil would go to the Catskills early in the season," said his wife, Susan Pace Weiss.
EXPLORE
By Mary K. Tilghman | January 2, 2013
Catonsville is among a number of Baltimore locales featured in songs on a new CD that will be released Saturday at a special performance party at the Creative Alliance in Highlandtown. Dan Naiman, a Catonsville resident for more than 20 years, plays bass for the Stone Hill All-Stars that will perform material from the "The Stone Hill All-Stars Live!" CD during the Jan. 5 event. The band, made up of Baltimore-area residents, recorded the music during an Aug. 4 concert at An Die Musik, a downtown performance space on Charles Street.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun Reporter | June 26, 2008
James M. McKinney Jr., a retired assistant plant manager and a musician, died of a heart attack June 18 at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. The longtime Dundalk resident was 70 and performed as a one-man band known as Mambo Jim. Mr. McKinney was a 1955 graduate of Dundalk High School. He was an electrician at Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s Sparrows Point shipyard from 1955 to 1961, when he went to work at Raymond Metal Products in maintenance. Management at the North Point Road plant changed several times while he worked there, and he was promoted to assistant plant manager after it was taken over by National Wire Co. After leaving National Wire, he owned and operated a home improvement business from 1974 to 1976.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | December 4, 2006
William H. Healey Jr., a retired Navy musician who estimated he had played "Anchors Aweigh" several thousand times, died of Alzheimer's disease Wednesday at the Maryland Masonic Home in Hunt Valley. The Annapolis resident was 89. Born in Baltimore and raised on Ellicott Driveway, he quit Gwynns Falls Junior High School in the ninth grade to help support his family by playing a saxophone his father had given him one Christmas. He also sold newspapers and summertime snowballs. He joined The Evening Sun Newsboys' Band in 1927, and a year later a Sun story about Mr. Healey described him as "three and a half feet short and 58 pounds light."
NEWS
September 24, 2006
Danny Flores, 77, who played the saxophone and shouted the word "tequila" in the 1950s hit song "Tequila!", died of complications from pneumonia Tuesday at a hospital in Huntington Beach, Calif. The man sometimes called the "godfather of Latin rock" was born in Santa Paula, Calif., and grew up in Long Beach. By age 5, he was playing guitar in church. At 14, he was a member of a trio that performed Mexican music. In 1957, he was in a group that recorded work with rockabilly singer Dave Burgess.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MARC SHAPIRO and MARC SHAPIRO,SUN REPORTER | July 27, 2006
Karl Denson is taking a step back from singing to get back to the music. The saxophonist has played with Lenny Kravitz, released several solo albums and fronted the Greyboy Allstars and Karl Denson's Tiny Universe. But he is going low key in the coming months. He's touring small clubs across the country with his new jazz trio, which plays Rams Head Tavern in Annapolis Saturday and the 8x10 in Federal Hill Sunday. Denson hasn't tinkered extensively with a traditional jazz format since his pre-Kravitz days in the late '80s, when he performed in anything from a duo to a quintet.
NEWS
May 17, 2006
Megan Markland, Havre de Grace SPORT SOFTBALL GIRLS STATS -- Markland is the Warriors' starting center fielder and leadoff hitter. She has seven stolen bases and one home run this season. SIDELINES -- The junior is a starting midfielder on the soccer team and starts at guard on the basketball team. She plays the saxophone in the jazz, marching and concert bands. She has a 3.6 grade point average and belongs to the National Honor Society and SMILES, which is Havre de Grace's service organization.
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