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BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 7, 2004
Howard County firefighters continued to grapple yesterday with large, smoldering piles of sawdust at a Jessup company that turns waste wood into commercial products. The fire started about 5 p.m. Tuesday in a building where the sawdust was stored, in the 8200 block of Dorsey Run Road. Bill Mould, spokesman for the Howard County Department of Fire and Rescue Services, said that the fire has remained "deep-seated" in the piles of sawdust. About 15 firefighters were expected to manage the scene through last night and into today.
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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 7, 2004
Howard County firefighters continued to grapple yesterday with large, smoldering piles of sawdust at a Jessup company that turns waste wood into commercial products. The fire started about 5 p.m. Tuesday in a building where the sawdust was stored, in the 8200 block of Dorsey Run Road. Bill Mould, spokesman for the Howard County Department of Fire and Rescue Services, said that the fire has remained "deep-seated" in the piles of sawdust. About 15 firefighters were expected to manage the scene through last night and into today.
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NEWS
February 7, 1999
Q. I had to cut up three good-sized trees that broke apart in the ice storm a few weeks back. As a result, there is a lot of fresh sawdust in my yard. Will it hurt the grass? Can I compost it?A. Sawdust that completely covers the turf could smother and kill it. You can spread it out with a rake, but you will need to apply nitrogen fertilizer to the area in the spring because soil microbes will use up the existing nitrogen to break down the sawdust. This action could rob your turf of needed nitrogen.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 6, 2004
Howard County firefighters were battling a two-alarm blaze last night at a Jessup company that turns waste wood into commercial products. The fire was reported shortly after 5 p.m. at American Wood Fibers Co. in the 8200 block of Dorsey Run Road and quickly went to two alarms, said Bill Mould, a county fire spokesman. He said the firm processes sawdust for the manufacturing of pet bedding. Mould said the fire - whose cause was under investigation - was in a metal building more than 100 feet long and holding several tons of sawdust.
FEATURES
By Ken Fuson and Ken Fuson,SUN STAFF | December 29, 1997
When he was a boy, Tom Hooper awoke every Christmas morning to the sound of a Lionel train whistle, the sight of a decorated tree and the smell of sawdust and sauerkraut.He did again this year.Now a medical executive and a father of two, Hooper has kept a Baltimore family tradition alive. Every fall, he begins assembling a Christmas garden in the living room of his home.There was a time when many of the homes in East and South Baltimore displayed Christmas gardens -- villages assembled with miniature cardboard homes, tiny lead figurines and toy train sets.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 6, 2004
Howard County firefighters were battling a two-alarm blaze last night at a Jessup company that turns waste wood into commercial products. The fire was reported shortly after 5 p.m. at American Wood Fibers Co. in the 8200 block of Dorsey Run Road and quickly went to two alarms, said Bill Mould, a county fire spokesman. He said the firm processes sawdust for the manufacturing of pet bedding. Mould said the fire - whose cause was under investigation - was in a metal building more than 100 feet long and holding several tons of sawdust.
FEATURES
By Dolly Merritt | June 29, 1996
Around the houseClean outside grill easily. When grill is warm, wipe clean with a crumpled piece of aluminum foil.Remove perspiration stains from clothing. Make a paste of baking soda and water and apply to spot and rub. Launder as usual.For outdoor barbecues, use an ice bucket as a serving dish. It keeps cold and hot foods at the right temperatures and isunbreakable.In the gardenSprinkle sawdust between leafy perennials in damp, shady areas that draw slugs. Shallow saucers of beer will attract slugs causing them to drown.
NEWS
October 7, 1995
Edward Lowe, 75, Kitty Litter discovererEdward Lowe, whose accidental discovery of a product he called Kitty Litter made cats more welcome household company and created a half-billion dollar industry, died on Wednesday at a hospital in Sarasota, Fla. He was 75 and had divided his time between homes in Arcadia, Fla., and Cassopolis, Mich. His son Tom said the cause was complications from surgery for cerebral hemorrhage.In a story he always relished telling, Mr. Lowe, then a 27-year-old Navy veteran who had been working in his father's sawdust business, was visited by a cat-loving neighbor whose cat's sand box had frozen.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,Sun Staff Writer | June 5, 1994
A Forest Hill custom cabinetmaking business was severely damaged Wednesday by a three-alarm blaze when sawdust accidentally ignited during a sanding operation, fire authorities said.Canatella Inc., in the 2700 block of Putnam Road off Route 165, was engulfed in flames when the first alarm sounded at 3:19 p.m., said Bob Thomas, deputy chief state fire marshal. About 125 volunteers and 41 pieces of equipment from Jarrettsville, Bel Air, Fallston, Joppa-Magnolia, Kingsville, Jacksonville, Delta-Cardiff and Fawn Grove, Pa., fought the fire in the three-story, concrete-block building.
NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,Sun Staff Writer | January 6, 1995
MOUNT AIRY -- The 52-inch steel blade slices the oak timber, spewing sawdust that falls like snow onto the shoulders of Malone Gouge. The powdery cloak suits him.Mr. Gouge, 68, has worn it since he first shoveled sawdust in his father's mill. The 60 years since then shaped a scrappy mountain boy into a hard-nosed mountain man for whom "sawmilling," as he calls it, is reason enough for living.Once fairly common in Maryland, few small mills like his survive today. The price of timber's high.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | February 26, 2004
The roar of electric saws and sanders filled the wood shop at Florence Bain Senior Center in Columbia on Tuesday, but Jim Koury and Jim Bowen were deep in conversation. Bowen, of Columbia, was offering suggestions on Koury's wooden bowl, made by spinning a block of wood on a lathe and trimming it with a long metal tool. "It's the first woodworking I've ever done," said Koury, of Ellicott City, who recently retired from teaching philosophy at the Community College of Baltimore County and signed up for Bowen's bowl-turning class.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | July 10, 2001
BLADES, Del. -- With all the fanfare of a ship launching, hundreds of politicians, farmers, poultry industry leaders and environmentalists from Maryland and Delaware gathered yesterday to send off the first trainload of processed chicken litter to grain farms in the Midwest -- an export the unlikely group of allies hailed as a crucial step toward restoring the Chesapeake Bay and fragile coastal waters of both states. Loaded in three Norfolk Southern rail cars were 3/8 -inch pellets of pasteurized chicken litter produced at a $12 million, state-of-the-art plant built by Perdue Farms and its Missouri-based partner, AgriRecycle.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | July 22, 1999
Black & Decker Corp. reported yesterday that its second-quarter profit jumped 30 percent -- handily beating Wall Street estimates -- thanks to an electrifying performance in its core power tools business.The Towson-based maker of tools and hardware said it earned a record $70.7 million in the quarter that ended July 4, compared with the $54.2 million it earned in the second quarter last year.Because of a stock buyback that reduced the number of shares outstanding, profit per share jumped 40 percent to 80 cents, exceeding the consensus estimate of 77 cents and the top estimate of 79 cents, according to Zacks Investment Research.
NEWS
February 7, 1999
Q. I had to cut up three good-sized trees that broke apart in the ice storm a few weeks back. As a result, there is a lot of fresh sawdust in my yard. Will it hurt the grass? Can I compost it?A. Sawdust that completely covers the turf could smother and kill it. You can spread it out with a rake, but you will need to apply nitrogen fertilizer to the area in the spring because soil microbes will use up the existing nitrogen to break down the sawdust. This action could rob your turf of needed nitrogen.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | September 22, 1998
Once a place where patrons ate off paper plates at picnic tables, and traipsed through sawdust on the floors, Legal Sea Foods has expanded out of Boston to become a chain of 17 restaurants.The newest location is at 100 E. Pratt St. in Baltimore's InnerHarbor, in space until recently occupied by Sfuzzi, an Italian bistro.The site -- the chain's first in Maryland -- is one that Roger Berkowitz, the 46-year-old president and chief executive of Legal Sea Foods Inc., has been watching for more than two years because of its potential for good lunch, weekend and convention business.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | August 7, 1998
How is the mayor of Taneytown spending his summer vacation?Three days a week, W. Robert Flickinger accompanies eight student volunteers to the city's four parks, where they spend hours under a relentless sun, shoveling mulch around trees and spreading sawdust under playground equipment.The project has saved the city thousands of dollars in maintenance and tree-replacement costs. Flickinger's middle school volunteers have mulched more than 200 trees, spread five dump-truck loads of sawdust, picked up trash and swept parking lots over the past three weeks.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | August 7, 1998
How is the mayor of Taneytown spending his summer vacation?Three days a week, W. Robert Flickinger accompanies eight student volunteers to the city's four parks, where they spend hours under a relentless sun, shoveling mulch around trees and spreading sawdust under playground equipment.The project has saved the city thousands of dollars in maintenance and tree-replacement costs. Flickinger's middle school volunteers have mulched more than 200 trees, spread five dump-truck loads of sawdust, picked up trash and swept parking lots over the past three weeks.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | August 7, 1998
How is the mayor of Taneytown spending his summer vacation?Three days a week, W. Robert Flickinger accompanies eight student volunteers to the city's four parks, where they spend hours under a relentless sun, shoveling mulch around trees and spreading sawdust under playground equipment.The project has saved the city thousands of dollars in maintenance and tree-replacement costs. Flickinger's middle school volunteers have mulched more than 200 trees, spread five dump-truck loads of sawdust, picked up trash and swept parking lots over the past three weeks.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | August 7, 1998
How is the mayor of Taneytown spending his summer vacation?Three days a week, W. Robert Flickinger accompanies eight student volunteers to the city's four parks, where they spend hours under a relentless sun, shoveling mulch around trees and spreading sawdust under playground equipment.The project has saved the city thousands of dollars in maintenance and tree-replacement costs. Flickinger's middle school volunteers have mulched more than 200 trees, spread five dump-truck loads of sawdust, picked up trash and swept parking lots over the past three weeks.
NEWS
By Mike Burns | April 12, 1998
THE HARSH winds and the brief cold snap have leveled the daffodils. My heart leaps up (in sorrow) when I behold the broken stems, to paraphrase Wordsworth.The early tulips have shot up to unfurl their colorful sheaths. The crocus were eager to flash their bright spring colors as a final confirmation of a warm, mild winter, before fading in fugacious routine. The bleeding heart in the center garden is dripping with tiny pink purses, the windflowers sprouting their pastel parasols.Yet it is the rows of daffodils and their cousins, jonquils, that are the messengers of true spring for me -- the hardy formations of closely bunched yellow and white blooms that support each other and array their colors in unmistakable eruptions of springtime.
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