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Savion Glover

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By Mary Carole McCauley | February 12, 2009
Mr. Happy Feet himself - Savion Glover - brings his virtuoso brand of tap to Maryland this weekend for three performances as part of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's Symphony With a Twist. The orchestra will play solo for the first half of the program. After intermission, Glover will bring his size 12 1/2 shoes and flying dreads to four songs, varying in style from Latin to big band to Afro-Caribbean, and finally, to a Duke Ellington selection that fuses jazz and classical themes. You'll be dancing to quite an eclectic program.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2014
With "Save the Last Dance" and the shot-in-Baltimore "Step Up," Duane Adler established himself as one of the go-to screenwriters for 21st-century dance movies. But apparently that wasn't enough. "Make Your Move," a multicultural dance drama with tons of "Romeo and Juliet" undertones that opens in theaters today, marks Adler's debut as both screenwriter and director. Not that he didn't like what other directors had done with his earlier projects, he stresses. But this one was too much his baby to hand it over to anyone else.
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FEATURES
March 1, 2007
Take in the tapping feet of Savion Glover as he accompanies the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra tonight at 8, Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, 1212 Cathedral St. Tickets are $25-$78. Call 410-783-8000 or go to baltimoresymphony.org for more in formation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley | February 12, 2009
Mr. Happy Feet himself - Savion Glover - brings his virtuoso brand of tap to Maryland this weekend for three performances as part of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's Symphony With a Twist. The orchestra will play solo for the first half of the program. After intermission, Glover will bring his size 12 1/2 shoes and flying dreads to four songs, varying in style from Latin to big band to Afro-Caribbean, and finally, to a Duke Ellington selection that fuses jazz and classical themes. You'll be dancing to quite an eclectic program.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun Reporter | February 25, 2007
To watch Savion Glover dance to Vivaldi's Four Seasons is to see a man trying to turn himself into a violin. SAVION GLOVER WITH THE BSO / / 8 p.m. Thursday and Saturday, Meyerhoff Symphony Hall / / 8 p.m. Friday, Strathmore Hall / / 410-783-8000 or balti moresymphony.org; 877-276-1444 or bsoatstrathmore.org Savion Glover Age: 33 Birthplace: Newark, N.J. Residence: New York Stage: Won eight major awards, including a 1996 Tony Award for choreography for Bring in 'Da Noise, Bring in 'Da Funk.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lewis Segal and Lewis Segal,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 1, 2005
When Savion Glover isn't redefining the art of tap-dancing, he slips the most famous feet in show business into size 12 1/2 Jordans or boots. Filling that footwear would be a tall order for anyone else, because nobody in millennial dance so dominates any style or idiom as definitively as Glover dominates tap. At 31, he's the acknowledged master - the summation of tap's past, the torchbearer for its future - with no real rivals on the horizon, but plenty...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,Sun Staff | April 9, 2000
Savion Glover has tap-danced his way to Broadway. He's tapped his way to the White House. And he's tapped his way to cities around the world. This week Glover, 26, taps his way to Baltimore in "Savion! The Concert" on Thursday, Friday and Saturday. . But don't go to the Lyric Opera House to see a show. According to Glover, nothing could be further from the truth -- even though the 26-year-old has spent more than half his life on stage. He made his Broadway debut at age 12, and a year later, became the youngest person nominated for a Tony Award for his performance in "Black and Blue."
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and Mary Carole McCauley and J. Wynn Rousuck and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2002
The 2002-2003 season at the Lyric Opera House will be a trip down memory lane, featuring return engagements of a number of Baltimore favorites, spiced up with a few newcomers to town, including Miss Saigon and Some Like It Hot, starring Tony Curtis. "Miss Saigon makes it certainly the most exciting season we've presented," said Nicholas A. Litrenta, president of Performing Arts Productions, which books the series. "I'm equally as excited about Some Like It Hot. It is a completely new musical featuring one of America's favorite stars.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kim Hart | April 28, 2005
NOW OR NEVER The clicks of tap shoes will reverberate through the Hippodrome Theatre Wednesday and May 5 as Savion Glover combines his rhythmic choreography with the sounds of a four-part jazz band. Known as the master of tap, Glover will show off his solo improvisations as well as his Tony Award-winning choreography with other dancers. The program will also feature Glover's singing and songwriting talents with a Tribute to Michael Jackson. Savion Glover performs at the Hippodrome, 12 N. Eutaw St., Wednesday and May 5 at 8 p.m. Tickets are $22-$47.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 10, 2004
Zatoichi is an aging, oddly blond Japanese masseuse who likes to gamble and wields a sword like there's no tomorrow ... which there isn't, for any who annoy him. Fortunately, he's also laid-back. That may not sound like much to hang a movie franchise on, but trust me, it works. Or if not me, trust the millions of Japanese moviegoers, who since the early '60s, have made the 20-odd Zatoichi films the Eastern answer to James Bond. Released last year in Japan, The Blind Swordsman marks a turning point for the franchise: Gone is Shintaro Katsu, the actor whose last performance as Zatoichi was in 1989.
FEATURES
March 1, 2007
Take in the tapping feet of Savion Glover as he accompanies the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra tonight at 8, Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, 1212 Cathedral St. Tickets are $25-$78. Call 410-783-8000 or go to baltimoresymphony.org for more in formation.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun Reporter | February 25, 2007
To watch Savion Glover dance to Vivaldi's Four Seasons is to see a man trying to turn himself into a violin. SAVION GLOVER WITH THE BSO / / 8 p.m. Thursday and Saturday, Meyerhoff Symphony Hall / / 8 p.m. Friday, Strathmore Hall / / 410-783-8000 or balti moresymphony.org; 877-276-1444 or bsoatstrathmore.org Savion Glover Age: 33 Birthplace: Newark, N.J. Residence: New York Stage: Won eight major awards, including a 1996 Tony Award for choreography for Bring in 'Da Noise, Bring in 'Da Funk.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lewis Segal and Lewis Segal,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 1, 2005
When Savion Glover isn't redefining the art of tap-dancing, he slips the most famous feet in show business into size 12 1/2 Jordans or boots. Filling that footwear would be a tall order for anyone else, because nobody in millennial dance so dominates any style or idiom as definitively as Glover dominates tap. At 31, he's the acknowledged master - the summation of tap's past, the torchbearer for its future - with no real rivals on the horizon, but plenty...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kim Hart | April 28, 2005
NOW OR NEVER The clicks of tap shoes will reverberate through the Hippodrome Theatre Wednesday and May 5 as Savion Glover combines his rhythmic choreography with the sounds of a four-part jazz band. Known as the master of tap, Glover will show off his solo improvisations as well as his Tony Award-winning choreography with other dancers. The program will also feature Glover's singing and songwriting talents with a Tribute to Michael Jackson. Savion Glover performs at the Hippodrome, 12 N. Eutaw St., Wednesday and May 5 at 8 p.m. Tickets are $22-$47.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 10, 2004
Zatoichi is an aging, oddly blond Japanese masseuse who likes to gamble and wields a sword like there's no tomorrow ... which there isn't, for any who annoy him. Fortunately, he's also laid-back. That may not sound like much to hang a movie franchise on, but trust me, it works. Or if not me, trust the millions of Japanese moviegoers, who since the early '60s, have made the 20-odd Zatoichi films the Eastern answer to James Bond. Released last year in Japan, The Blind Swordsman marks a turning point for the franchise: Gone is Shintaro Katsu, the actor whose last performance as Zatoichi was in 1989.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and Mary Carole McCauley and J. Wynn Rousuck and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2002
The 2002-2003 season at the Lyric Opera House will be a trip down memory lane, featuring return engagements of a number of Baltimore favorites, spiced up with a few newcomers to town, including Miss Saigon and Some Like It Hot, starring Tony Curtis. "Miss Saigon makes it certainly the most exciting season we've presented," said Nicholas A. Litrenta, president of Performing Arts Productions, which books the series. "I'm equally as excited about Some Like It Hot. It is a completely new musical featuring one of America's favorite stars.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | March 9, 1995
There's never been a Broadway musical quite like "Jelly's Last Jam."Oh, there have been plenty of revues in tribute to black composers, such as "Sophisticated Ladies" (Ellington) and "Eubie!" (Blake). But "Jelly's Last Jam," currently at the Lyric Opera House, is a full-fledged book musical that dares to examine its protagonist in an unvarnished -- and unflattering -- light. This show views Jelly Roll Morton not only as a jazz pioneer, but as a racist who spurned his own black roots.Nor is that director and playwright George C. Wolfe's only gutsy move.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | March 4, 1999
Near the end of the highly original, virtuosic tap dance musical "Bring in 'da Noise, Bring in 'da Funk," there's a number called "Conversations" that is the realization of the phrase: "If those shoes could talk."For nearly two hours, the audience at the Mechanic Theatre has been watching five powerfully talented dancers use tap as a metaphor to chronicle African-American history. Then, after a series of monologues recorded by the dancers, they take the floor, one by one, and express their individuality.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,Sun Staff | April 9, 2000
Savion Glover has tap-danced his way to Broadway. He's tapped his way to the White House. And he's tapped his way to cities around the world. This week Glover, 26, taps his way to Baltimore in "Savion! The Concert" on Thursday, Friday and Saturday. . But don't go to the Lyric Opera House to see a show. According to Glover, nothing could be further from the truth -- even though the 26-year-old has spent more than half his life on stage. He made his Broadway debut at age 12, and a year later, became the youngest person nominated for a Tony Award for his performance in "Black and Blue."
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | March 4, 1999
Near the end of the highly original, virtuosic tap dance musical "Bring in 'da Noise, Bring in 'da Funk," there's a number called "Conversations" that is the realization of the phrase: "If those shoes could talk."For nearly two hours, the audience at the Mechanic Theatre has been watching five powerfully talented dancers use tap as a metaphor to chronicle African-American history. Then, after a series of monologues recorded by the dancers, they take the floor, one by one, and express their individuality.
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