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BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | January 12, 2001
Are you missing out on free money? "Americans could be earning a lot more interest on their cash without taking any, or little, additional risk," says a study by the Consumer Federation of America. It points out that "Americans hold trillions in low-yielding savings accounts and could earn substantially more in interest by shifting that cash into higher-yielding alternatives." The study suggests moving some money from savings accounts into certificates of deposit ("the highest rates in several years")
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NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2014
Del. Heather R. Mizeur promised to push for a law allowing physician-assisted suicide in Maryland if elected governor. "If terminally ill, mentally competent adults choose to end their life, they should be able to seek a life-ending dose of medicine from their physician," Mizeur said in a policy proposal released late Tuesday. Three states - Oregon, Washington, and Vermont - have similar policies, dubbed by advocates "Death with Dignity" laws. Mizeur, a Democrat from Montgomery County, outlined her call for legalization of doctor-assisted suicide along with ideas to help seniors as they retire, age, get sick and approach death.
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BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | September 1, 2002
A FEW years ago, investors expected double-digit percentage gains from investments. Now, their ambitions are far more modest - safety. Del Karfonta, executive vice president of the Columbia Bank, said the bank this year has seen deposits increase 10 percent in savings accounts and 35 percent in certificates of deposit by customers taking a wait-and-see approach to the stock market. "It's starting to grow to the point that it's catching our attention," he said. For these customers, Karfonta said, "It's not so much, `I want a 10 percent return on my money.
NEWS
March 20, 2014
I wonder why letter writer S. R. Cohen is so quick to attack neurosurgeon Ben Carson when he seems so unaware of Mr. Carson's beliefs ( "Ben Carson commits 'values malpractice,'" March 16). One would have to look far and wide to find anyone with greater moral clarity or finer track record than Dr. Carson. Dr. Carson is not against universal health care; he just knows there are ways to do it that shouldn't involve throwing the country over a fiscal cliff, after which there will be no benefits for anyone.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 19, 2000
WASHINGTON - Vice President Al Gore will propose tomorrow a plan to set aside $200 billion over 10 years from the projected federal budget surplus to entice spendthrift Americans to save more money for retirement, a first home, education or catastrophic health care costs. Gore's Family Savings Accounts - the largest piece of a tax cut package totaling $500 billion - is the Democratic presidential candidate's answer to his Republican rival, Texas Gov. George W. Bush, who has proposed the partial privatization of the Social Security system.
NEWS
By Monica Rhor and Monica Rhor,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 31, 2000
PHILADELPHIA - Back in her native Ukraine, Irina Mitsik learned to mistrust banks. After all, they could be open one day, then gone - along with all her savings - the next. In the Ghanaian refugee camp where he spent seven years, Donald Todey never thought about saving for the future. After all, in a place where food was scarce and hardships plentiful, no one worried about tomorrow. These days, however, both are carving out new lives in a country where savings accounts, credit histories and checkbooks are not just a fact of life but a factor in determining who sinks and who swims.
NEWS
February 12, 2013
Dr. Benjamin Carson, the eminent Johns Hopkins pediatric neurosurgeon, has received much attention over the years not only for his skills in the operating room but for what he has achieved beyond it. For many Baltimoreans, his story is a familiar one - born in Detroit, raised in poverty by a single mother, he overcame much to not only become a Medal of Freedom winner but a benefactor to thousands of young people through his scholarship program....
BUSINESS
By Gail MarksJarvis and Gail MarksJarvis,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | January 13, 2008
Let 2008 be the year you finally carry through on your promises to pay more attention to your 401(k) retirement savings plan at work. If you are like most people, you have had plenty of good intentions. You have promised yourself that you will save more or figure out just which funds you should really be using. But perhaps you have left money languishing in a savings account in a bank earning a measly 2 percent interest, when you might have earned an average of 8 percent to 10 percent a year in your 401(k)
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2012
There's a good chance during open enrollment this fall that you will be offered a high-deductible insurance plan with a savings account - if you haven't already been nudged into one. Increasingly, employers are offering this as a way to rein in their health insurance costs. The high deductible means lower premiums, benefits experts say. And employees - confronted with the prospect of potentially paying thousands of dollars before insurance kicks in - are less likely to run to the emergency room for minor problems, which also keeps costs down.
BUSINESS
By Jim Mitchell and Jim Mitchell,Dallas Morning News | April 17, 1994
DALLAS -- It's 8 a.m., hardly the hour most folks would eagerly stand in a bank line.But for Sarah Conant and other fourth-graders at Robert Hyer Elementary School in Highland Park, Texas, it's never too early to start saving, especially if the bank comes to you.Quietly waiting her turn behind a line of 9- and 10-year-old classmates, Sarah, 10, watches intently as a Bank One teller in the school cafeteria hands her a receipt for a $10 deposit. The deposit brings her savings account balance to $173.
NEWS
By Cassandra Jones Havard | March 13, 2014
If you are among America's 68 million people who can't, won't or just don't do business with private banks, the post office wants you. Recognizing a need for affordable banking services among the nation's lower-income consumers, the U.S. Postal Service also sees a way to bolster its own bottom line by offering financial services. We'll get back to the post office in a minute. But first, who are these consumers who require a new model of financial services? The first, the so-called unbanked, are those who prefer to deal in cash and who don't use traditional, regulated banks for a myriad of reasons, including an inability or unwillingness to pay high fees or a poor credit history that precludes access to loans.
NEWS
February 12, 2013
Dr. Benjamin Carson, the eminent Johns Hopkins pediatric neurosurgeon, has received much attention over the years not only for his skills in the operating room but for what he has achieved beyond it. For many Baltimoreans, his story is a familiar one - born in Detroit, raised in poverty by a single mother, he overcame much to not only become a Medal of Freedom winner but a benefactor to thousands of young people through his scholarship program....
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2012
There's a good chance during open enrollment this fall that you will be offered a high-deductible insurance plan with a savings account - if you haven't already been nudged into one. Increasingly, employers are offering this as a way to rein in their health insurance costs. The high deductible means lower premiums, benefits experts say. And employees - confronted with the prospect of potentially paying thousands of dollars before insurance kicks in - are less likely to run to the emergency room for minor problems, which also keeps costs down.
NEWS
July 11, 2012
Next time the more bombastic in Washington rail against government waste, let them include every cent lost to Wednesday's dog and pony show in the House of Representatives, where time that might have been used constructively was frittered away with yet another attack on health care reform. For those who might have accidentally tuned into C-Span shortly before 1:30 p.m., that was not a repeat but an actual live telecast. For the 33 r d time since the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act was passed in 2010, the House held a vote to repeal part or all of it. Thirty-three times!
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2012
Roberto Pagan-Franco didn't have a bank account for decades. His employer paid him in cash or with a check that the Baltimore resident took to a check-cashing store. A few years ago he lost his job after a severe illness and for a time was homeless. Not exactly the type of customer you'd expect a big bank to court. But Pagan-Franco enrolled in a PNC Bank program that targets consumers who otherwise might be shut out of the banking system. And today, the 54-year-old has checking and savings accounts at PNC and is in the process of getting a credit card.
NEWS
By Marta H. Mossburg | December 20, 2010
Feeling pinched this Christmas season? Are your credit cards tapped from buying gifts? Are you underwater on your mortgage and wondering how you will be able to retire before 90? The answer is simple: Use government accounting! It will have you feeling rich in no time. Let's start with bills. If you do not have enough in your checking account to cover monthly expenses, take money from your children's savings accounts, their college savings fund and your retirement account — and run up your credit card bills, if you have any credit left on them.
BUSINESS
By JANET KIDD STEWART | November 7, 2004
SIMPLICITY is a marvelous thing in investing. We love the notion of rolling up that motley assortment of retirement and brokerage accounts from jobs and advisers gone by and starting fresh with a single new firm that will let us manipulate our finances with a mere keystroke when it's time to rebalance. Investment firms love it, too, and most offer fee breaks for keeping more and more of our money - all the more reason for monogamy. But chaining ourselves to a single investment firm goes against the grain for many of us, and the rash of mutual fund scandals only highlights the fear.
BUSINESS
By Gail MarksJarvis and Gail MarksJarvis,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | January 13, 2008
Let 2008 be the year you finally carry through on your promises to pay more attention to your 401(k) retirement savings plan at work. If you are like most people, you have had plenty of good intentions. You have promised yourself that you will save more or figure out just which funds you should really be using. But perhaps you have left money languishing in a savings account in a bank earning a measly 2 percent interest, when you might have earned an average of 8 percent to 10 percent a year in your 401(k)
BUSINESS
By Janet Kidd Stewart and Janet Kidd Stewart,Chicago Tribune | December 3, 2006
Health-savings accounts are growing fast, and so are the amounts of tax-free money consumers can sock away in the fledgling plans. The relatively new accounts, created for use starting in 2004, allow users of high-deductible health insurance plans to open tax-free savings accounts. The idea is to put consumers more directly in charge of their medical spending by making them financially responsible for more of their care. Health-savings accounts are the plan's carrot, enticing consumers to go with lower-premium, high-deductible plans in exchange for contributing tax-deductible dollars into accounts that grow tax free and are withdrawn tax free if used for health care expenses.
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