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NEWS
By Art Buchwald | June 6, 1995
THERE WAS a big sigh of relief in the land when Congress passed its mammoth budget cuts. Americans love budget reductions and thrive on slashing the deficit.The first week went smoothly, and everyone commented how well a cost-effective government was working.But during the second week the entire city of Cincinnati was poisoned by a mysterious slug in the drinking water."How could this possibly happen?" the newspaper editorials huffed and puffed."Where were the Centers for Disease Control?"
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2014
Car-sharing company Zipcar has expanded quickly in its four years in Baltimore, scaling up from an initial fleet of 27 cars to more than 200 vehicles. The Boston-based company announced Monday the opening of a new office in Harbor East, next to a new on-street city bike corral. The company has more than doubled its workforce to seven employees, said spokeswoman Lindsay Wester, and expanded throughout the city from its beginnings around the Homewood campus of the Johns Hopkins University.
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BUSINESS
By Tami Luhby and Tami Luhby,Newsday | March 18, 2007
As Kathryn Moosbrugger plans her September wedding, she has found two effective ways to save money: Keep a firm budget in mind and meet with people face to face. These tenets helped her cut costs when she hired a band last year. She and her fiance, Nick Laganza, met with the production company in its office and told the agent that her budget was $6,000. The band asked for $6,500 for a seven-piece orchestra to play at their reception. After an hour of chatting about music and the wedding, they settled on $6,200.
NEWS
April 24, 2014
Vincent DeMarco knows a lot about the ACA but his math skills aren't so good ( "For thousands of Marylanders, the Affordable Care Act is a big success," April 22). In his letter to the editor he touts $164 million of collective premium savings that will no longer will be needed to pay for uncompensated care for individuals without health insurance. However, at 320,000, the number of ACA enrollees in Maryland that was cited by Mr. DeMarco, the savings for uncompensated care works out to be $513 per enrollee.
NEWS
By Tawanda W. Johnson and Tawanda W. Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 22, 2004
They might not be old enough to open their own savings accounts without help from Mom or Dad, but Worthington Elementary School pupils already have learned the important lesson of saving money. That's because, for the past 10 years, the school has had a partnership with Columbia Bank that enables the children to learn about saving with real accounts and meetings with bank representatives. "This just shows them how important it is to save," said Jane Sims, assistant principal at the school, who oversees the program at Worthington with school counselor Milene Pettit.
BUSINESS
By David Altaner and David Altaner,Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | July 17, 1992
In the 1990s, saving money is in style.This is why when I read a recent interview in the Wall Street Journal with a tightwad, I decided to take some of the advice in her newsletter.Rinse out your coffee filters, let them dry, and then re-use them, she said. So I did, and didn't tell my fiancee before she made herself a cup. She took one sip, spat it out, and yowled, "This coffee has freezer burn."So I learned there is such a thing as going too far to save money. Still, that doesn't mean that saving money is a bad idea.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | April 17, 2000
Seven-year-old Harish Lall put a dollar in his account the other day and vowed to keep depositing money until he saved enough to buy a $2,000 laptop computer. Getting to the bank, at least, will be easy: It's at school. Every Friday before class, Harish and other pupils at Swansfield Elementary in Columbia deposit their coins, bills and checks in the school's bank -- an honest-to-goodness, FDIC-insured place to hand over their money. That's because Farmers and Mechanics National Bank is backing the project, and the deposits are transferred to its vaults.
NEWS
By Diane E. Otts and Diane E. Otts,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 13, 1996
Michelle Potter has always been passionate about the environment. And growing up in a single-parent household, she was always aware of a need to be thrifty. But it wasn't until 1987 that she made a connection between saving the Earth and saving money."When I started to garden organically, doing things like composting and using cayenne pepper and garlic spray to deter pests, I realized that not only were those methods effective and safe for the environment, but also that it was much cheaper than buying chemicals," says Potter, 37, who lives near Guilford.
NEWS
By KRISTINE HENRY and KRISTINE HENRY,SUN STAFF | April 20, 1999
Sure, Brandon Eckard plans to be the next Michael Jordan when he grows up. But he wants to go to college before joining the NBA -- in case he has to fall back on being a lawyer or businessman -- and if he doesn't get a basketball scholarship, that means hefty tuition payments.That's why he's saving now. Brandon, a 9-year-old at Elmer A. Wolfe Elementary in Union Bridge, won a fourth-grade essay contest yesterday on the importance of saving money."Another reason why I should save for the future is because I need to buy a house and pay taxes," he wrote in his essay.
NEWS
May 1, 1994
Welfare reform was high on Gov. William Donald Schaefer's list of priorities this year. But the welfare reform bill that passed the General Assembly is sitting on his desk, facing a possible veto because it does not contain a "family cap," a provision that would deny an increase in benefits to a woman who has an additional child after being placed on the welfare rolls.The cap appeals to fairness, but the governor's attachment to it is somewhat puzzling. He asserts that it would save money, but that is a dubious proposition since it would affect only a minority of women on welfare.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2014
Baltimore officials are set to approve spending nearly $30 million to replace 338 aging vehicles, including firetrucks and police cruisers. "When you have police cars and fire and EMS vehicles that are out of service, it makes it difficult to have the amount of vehicles on the street that you need," Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said. "My goal was to figure out, what can we do to tackle this issue?" Bob Cenname , the city's deputy budget director, said replacing the vehicles will result in millions in savings due to lower repair and fuel costs.
NEWS
March 15, 2014
A Smart Meter was recently installed on my house. I was skeptical as to whether this would help me save energy. As it turns out, I think it is. I live in a house with heat pumps and programmable thermostats. I have long been leery of claims that a programmable thermostat would save me money. The theory is that if I turn down my heat at night I'll save money. The problem with this reasoning is that I have to turn the heat back up the next day, and I've always suspected that this process of reheating the house would use more energy than I saved by turning the heat down.
HEALTH
Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2014
Along with the Johns Hopkins University's distinction for its nation-leading haul of federal research dollars comes another for charging the government more for utilities, administrative staff and real estate than any other institution. The federal government spent nearly $172 million in its 2012 fiscal year to reimburse the university for so-called overhead expenses associated with nearly $646 million of federally sponsored research. Both of those figures led the nation that year.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2014
Chestertown officials have been interested in energy conservation for a long time - they started tracking usage levels during the 1970s energy crisis. Even so, when the Eastern Shore town launched a project to cut back on electricity costs seven years ago, the municipality cut usage by 11 percent and sliced more than $130,000 in annual expenses. Now local leaders are hoping to expand on that success. They've launched the ShorePower Project with four other communities - Cambridge, Easton, Salisbury and Snow Hill - to help leaders in those places find ways to use energy more efficiently and with less impact on the environment.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2013
The developer of Harbor Point plans to buy the initial offering of city-issued bonds for the $1.8 billion project, accruing millions in interest from the controversial public financing deal, city officials confirmed Thursday. Developer Michael S. Beatty's Harbor Point Development Group LLC plans to purchase about $35 million of the $107 million in bonds and would earn an estimated 6.5 percent interest rate, enabling him to pay for a construction loan. Stephen M. Kraus, the city's chief of treasury management, said the arrangement would save the city money because a private sale is cheaper to orchestrate than a public bond offering.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2013
Three orange engines sit in a building on the sprawling grounds of the Back River wastewater treatment plant, producing a steady din. And about 20 percent of the electricity the facility needs. "It's basically a mini power plant," said Ted Atwood, director of the Baltimore City Energy Office. This is "microgeneration" - operations that look nothing like the sprawling complexes that most of the country relies on for light, heat and air conditioning. Making electricity on site isn't new, but advocates say interest is growing among significant energy users, driven by cheaper prices for natural gas to fuel systems and reliability worries in the aftermath of extreme weather.
BUSINESS
By McClatchy-Tribune | June 10, 2007
NEW YORK -- There are two kinds of nonsavers, according to certified financial planner and investment adviser Bill DeShurko: people who don't earn enough money to put anything away and people who think they don't. If you're making a reasonable salary and still find yourself living paycheck to paycheck, the problem almost certainly isn't your income - it's your attitude. So says DeShurko, author of a book scheduled to be published next month, The Naked Truth About Your Money. The undressed truth about saving money is that we simply have to seize every single opportunity to sock it away.
FEATURES
By Catherine Cook | January 17, 1991
Looking great doesn't always have to cost a lot of money.Some of the best-looking people around town probably spend a lot less money than you'd think and exercise a great deal more imagination putting themselves together.Each Thursday we're going to bring you fashionable money-saving tips for all members of the family, and we want to hear your ideas.Perhaps you know of a super source for stylish bargains, a brand of pantyhose that never runs or a thrifty beauty tip you'd like to share.You can call us by using SUNDIAL.
EXPLORE
June 13, 2013
In reading the article ("CA explores heated pool open year-round," June 6) on the possibility of turning the Dorsey Hall pool into a heated year-round pool, my memory was jarred. CA currently has two heated outdoor pools, Stevens Forest and Swansfield. Wouldn't making necessary adjustments to either of those pools be more fiscally responsible than reconfiguring a third? Just a thought. Sue Heyman Columbia
NEWS
By Michael Lofthus, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2013
The University of Maryland's independent student newspaper will cut publishing to four days a week in the fall, Michael Fribush, president of parent company Maryland Media Inc., confirmed Friday. "We'll beef up our digital presence on Fridays. It'll be a little more economical to publish Monday through Thursday," he said. "[Editor-in-Chief Michael King] would be putting out a Friday issue on The Diamondback but digitally. " The Diamondback has been a weekday publication since its establishment in 1910 and receives no university funding, according to its website.
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