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By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 26, 2002
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - The video of his bloodied corpse broadcast around the world last weekend left no doubt that the Angolan government's claims were true: Jonas Savimbi, the flamboyant rebel leader in one of Africa's longest-running civil wars, was dead. Residents of Angola's capital, Luanda, greeted news of Savimbi's death with fireworks, cheers and honking car horns, hoping that, finally, three decades of war will be buried with him. But while Savimbi's death could refocus the world's attention on a forgotten southern African conflict that long ago exhausted the patience of the international community, creating a lasting peace will be difficult.
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NEWS
February 27, 2002
JONAS SAVIMBI was a survivor. He outlasted Cold War rivalries and apartheid South Africa, which financed his long struggle to topple Angola's Marxist government. After outside support dried up, he kept the war going by mining some of the world's finest diamonds. His slaying last week, at the age of 67, may finally bring a chance for peace in that southwest African country. This is why timing was so opportune for this week's meeting between President Bush and Angola's President Jose Eduardo dos Santos.
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NEWS
February 27, 2002
JONAS SAVIMBI was a survivor. He outlasted Cold War rivalries and apartheid South Africa, which financed his long struggle to topple Angola's Marxist government. After outside support dried up, he kept the war going by mining some of the world's finest diamonds. His slaying last week, at the age of 67, may finally bring a chance for peace in that southwest African country. This is why timing was so opportune for this week's meeting between President Bush and Angola's President Jose Eduardo dos Santos.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 26, 2002
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - The video of his bloodied corpse broadcast around the world last weekend left no doubt that the Angolan government's claims were true: Jonas Savimbi, the flamboyant rebel leader in one of Africa's longest-running civil wars, was dead. Residents of Angola's capital, Luanda, greeted news of Savimbi's death with fireworks, cheers and honking car horns, hoping that, finally, three decades of war will be buried with him. But while Savimbi's death could refocus the world's attention on a forgotten southern African conflict that long ago exhausted the patience of the international community, creating a lasting peace will be difficult.
NEWS
By The News and Courier, Charleston, S.C | May 17, 1991
JONAS SAVIMBI is one of the few guerrillas who truly deserves the title of "freedom fighter." Savimbi did not take up arms to seize power, but to oppose a one-party state so that free elections could be held in Angola.The approval . . . of legislation establishing a multiparty system in the southern African country vindicates Savimbi and his UNITA rebels. The Popular Movement for the Liberation of Angola and Savimbi's National Union for the Total Independence of Angola are scheduled to approve the agreement to establish a democratic system of government within a few days of a May 15 cease-fire.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 15, 1992
LUANDA, Angola -- Angola's government and the main opposition group have begun indirect talks in an effort to avert a return to civil war over the disputed elections held last month. But the two sides appeared to be far apart.The talks are being mediated by South African Foreign Minister Roelof F. Botha, who has been trying to steer the two main antagonists, President Jose Eduardo dos Santos and Jonas Savimbi of the opposition UNITA, into face-to-face negotiations.Mr. Botha's role in Angola's political imbroglio has become crucial because Mr. Savimbi has refused to meet with senior officials from the United States, Mr. Savimbi's biggest backer during UNITA's 16-year insurgency against the leftist government.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Staff Writer | April 7, 1992
LUANDA, Angola -- Jonas Savimbi, the U.S.-backed rebel leader who is battling to become Angola's next president, has confirmed that execution-style murders -- including the killing of children -- were carried out last year at his headquarters in the bush.Rumors of the brutalities have been troubling relations between Washington and Mr. Savimbi's UNITA rebels, which the United States supported with millions of dollars when Angola was a focal point of the Cold War-era struggle between the Soviet-supported government and UNITA.
NEWS
December 15, 1990
The winds of Eastern Europe are sweeping East Africa. The ruling Popular Movement for the Liberation of Angola has resolved to end its Marxist monopoly on power and introduce multi-party democracy. This will meet the condition of the U.S.-backed rebel leader, Jonas Savimbi, for a cease-fire in the 15-year-old civil war.Mr. Savimbi, after meetings this week with Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard Shevardnadze and President Bush, said a cease-fire was near and elections likely next year. Score another gain for the partnership that the U.S. and U.S.S.
NEWS
June 3, 1993
The Clinton administration's recognition of the Angolan government of Jose Eduardo dos Santos may be correct policy but it is not shutting down that country's long civil war. After Angolan independence in 1976, Washington shunned the Luanda regime because it was Communist, unelected, not in control of all territory and dependent on Cuban troops. Ironically, Cuban troops defended American oil installations from the depredations of U.S-backed UNITA guerrillas.Not much of this Cold War rationale was left after the Bush administration and the Gorbachev Kremlin put down their hatchets and the formerly Communist government of Mr. dos Santos won an election over a strong showing by the U.S.-backed UNITA of Jonas Savimbi.
NEWS
By GERALD J. BENDER | April 12, 1992
The Bush administration has taken steps in Angola to expunge one of the last vestiges of Cold War thinking from its foreign policy. Secretary of State James A. Baker III wrote to Jonas Savimbi, leader of the Angolan opposition movement UNITA, which has been U.S.-supported for years, demanding an explanation for charges of human rights violations and murder. That action moved the United States, for the first time in three decades of covert intervention in Angola, into a position of neutrality.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 9, 1997
KINSHASA, Zaire -- With a rebel force that invaded Zaire advancing through the countryside, new protagonists who want to secure vital interests here or settle old scores are being drawn into the conflict.With the fall of the longtime dictator, Mobutu Sese Seko, appearing ever more likely, governments of neighboring countries and insurgent groups from throughout Central Africa are scrambling to get involved on one side or the other of the conflict, diplomats, Zairian officials and regional military experts say.A growing coalition of forces is contributing to the fight against Mobutu, in what can be seen as a form of revenge for the decades during which Zaire, a major Cold War ally of the West, was used as a staging point for covert actions against neighbors.
NEWS
By John Balzar and John Balzar,Los Angeles Times | March 31, 1995
BUJUMBURA, Burundi -- This is an ordinary day of doom on the Central African highlands. In this country, too small to find on many maps, the question gnaws at anyone with the capacity to reason with the unreasonable: Does the genocide start tonight, again?Or will it just be more random gunfire and pervasive fear?Another night to sleep in the hills in the rain under a banana leaf because you worry that someone will come in the dark and slip a machete through your mattress?Choices in Burundi are meager, maddening.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | November 21, 1994
LUSAKA, Zambia -- After 19 years of civil war and 12 months of intense negotiations to stop it, the Angolan government yesterday signed a long-awaited peace agreement with the country's UNITA rebels.But even as the two sides agreed to peace, warfare continued in their embattled homeland.If the agreement holds, it would end one of Africa's longest and bloodiest conflicts, a war that killed more than a half-million people and made refugees of two million more, a fight that began when Gerald Ford sat in the White House and Leonid Brezhnev occupied the Kremlin.
NEWS
June 3, 1993
The Clinton administration's recognition of the Angolan government of Jose Eduardo dos Santos may be correct policy but it is not shutting down that country's long civil war. After Angolan independence in 1976, Washington shunned the Luanda regime because it was Communist, unelected, not in control of all territory and dependent on Cuban troops. Ironically, Cuban troops defended American oil installations from the depredations of U.S-backed UNITA guerrillas.Not much of this Cold War rationale was left after the Bush administration and the Gorbachev Kremlin put down their hatchets and the formerly Communist government of Mr. dos Santos won an election over a strong showing by the U.S.-backed UNITA of Jonas Savimbi.
NEWS
By WILLIAM MINTER | April 15, 1993
Washington. -- Zaire and Angola, neighboring central African countries with a combined population of about 50 million, are spiraling downward toward humanitarian crises exceeding Somalia in scale.The primary culprits are two former U.S. clients resisting the new era of African democratization.How the United States deals with Mobutu Sese Seko of Zaire and rebel leader Jonas Savimbi of Angola will be critical tests for the credibility of the Clinton administration's Africa policy.Failure will send a clear signal that it is the gun, not the vote, that counts.
NEWS
By Jose Patricio | April 11, 1993
The Angolan government and UNITA (Union for the Total Independence of Angola) are scheduled to resume their long-delayed direct negotiations tomorrow in Abidjan, Ivory Coast, under the mediation of the United Nations.This will be only the third round of U.N.-mediated talks since last October when UNITA, under its leader Jonas Savimbi (who once enjoyed U.S. and South African support) took up arms following its defeat in elections certified as free and fair by the United Nations and the Bush administration.
NEWS
By Jose Patricio | April 11, 1993
The Angolan government and UNITA (Union for the Total Independence of Angola) are scheduled to resume their long-delayed direct negotiations tomorrow in Abidjan, Ivory Coast, under the mediation of the United Nations.This will be only the third round of U.N.-mediated talks since last October when UNITA, under its leader Jonas Savimbi (who once enjoyed U.S. and South African support) took up arms following its defeat in elections certified as free and fair by the United Nations and the Bush administration.
NEWS
By WILLIAM MINTER | April 15, 1993
Washington. -- Zaire and Angola, neighboring central African countries with a combined population of about 50 million, are spiraling downward toward humanitarian crises exceeding Somalia in scale.The primary culprits are two former U.S. clients resisting the new era of African democratization.How the United States deals with Mobutu Sese Seko of Zaire and rebel leader Jonas Savimbi of Angola will be critical tests for the credibility of the Clinton administration's Africa policy.Failure will send a clear signal that it is the gun, not the vote, that counts.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 25, 1993
UNITED NATIONS -- While the United Nations probably enjoy a higher profile today than at any time in its history, its most important peacemaking missions are bogged down or threatened with collapse in trouble spots as varied as Angola, El Salvador, the former Yugoslavia, and Cambodia, raising the possibility of a damaging reversal to its influence in the year ahead.Despite these setbacks, demand for the organization's services as peacekeeper, mediator, election monitor, and distributor of aid remains so strong that the secretary-general, Boutros Boutros-Ghali, fears it may be unable to cope with the strains.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 15, 1992
LUANDA, Angola -- Angola's government and the main opposition group have begun indirect talks in an effort to avert a return to civil war over the disputed elections held last month. But the two sides appeared to be far apart.The talks are being mediated by South African Foreign Minister Roelof F. Botha, who has been trying to steer the two main antagonists, President Jose Eduardo dos Santos and Jonas Savimbi of the opposition UNITA, into face-to-face negotiations.Mr. Botha's role in Angola's political imbroglio has become crucial because Mr. Savimbi has refused to meet with senior officials from the United States, Mr. Savimbi's biggest backer during UNITA's 16-year insurgency against the leftist government.
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