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BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,Sun Columnist | March 27, 2007
We hear so often that Americans are poor savers that we forget there are plenty of workers who amass sizable sums with little fanfare. They might be in the next cubicle, next door or next-of-kin. It's not that they save because they make tons of money. Many good savers have modest incomes. They just don't spend every penny of it. Savers say they don't deny themselves the fun things in life. They spend on things that are important to them but don't waste dollars on the other stuff. But you can't help but wonder: Why are some people such good savers while others - even those with healthy six-figure incomes - live from paycheck to paycheck?
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BUSINESS
December 11, 2013
The Savers thrift store property on East Joppa Road in Parkville sold Wednesday to a regional investment firm for $6.875 million, an agent involved in the transaction said. The 39,500-square foot Savers superstore on the Joppa-Perring retail parcel opened in March. The property previously hosted a Giant, which closed in 2007. The site also has a Checkers Drive-In restaurant.  The 1917-1925 E. Joppa Road property last sold in 2008 for $6.8 million, according to state records.
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BUSINESS
By Jonathan Lansner and Jonathan Lansner,Orange County Register | April 5, 1992
Individual Retirement Accounts, scorned by investors since their tax-cutting powers were limited in 1986, apparently are enjoying a modest revival.New deposits to IRAs have been on the rise at several major brokerages and mutual funds in recent months, fueling speculation that the tax-advantaged accounts might rebound even without proposed changes in IRA rules.The IRA had a five-year reign as small savers' favorite tax shelter until 1986, when tax-code changes virtually eliminated it. Since then, financial institutions have slashed their IRA marketing and savers have stayed away in droves.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | December 10, 2013
The football world is still atwitter about the crazy ending at M&T Stadium on Sunday, but we're going to have to wait and see what it all meant. Was it a magical launching pad that will help send the Ravens on another exciting playoff run, or just another unforgettable moment in the team's eventful history? Maybe Ravens fans shouldn't get too greedy after some of the strange and wonderful things that happened last season on the road to the Super Bowl . They still get warm and fuzzy about the "Mile High Miracle" and Ray Lewis' catalytic retirement announcement.
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder News Service rHC B | December 30, 1991
While a 'screen saver' program such as After Dark is loads of fun, do you really need one? Several experts said such software was generally a good idea, though no one had any concrete evidence, such as a study showing how they actually prolonged screen life.To the extent that it's a problem, burn-in is more often seen on monochrome screens that run text-based operating systems, such as DOS, which always put characters in the same 80-by-24 grid.Graphic systems, such as the Macintosh and Windows, tend to have a more varied screen appearance, though menu bars and certain icons can be problems because they are often in the same part of the screen.
BUSINESS
By Jane Bryant Quinn | April 15, 1996
NEW YORK -- UNLESS savers care enough to protest -- loudly and in writing, to their senators and representatives -- Congress may gut a hugely important consumer law. It's called the Truth-in-Savings Act. Thanks to this 5-year-old law, savers get an honest accounting of the interest rate they earn. Bankers can no longer fudge.In the bad old days (not so long ago), you couldn't tell which savings deposit was the best deal. That's because there are lots of ways to figure yield. Given a choice between two certificates of deposit -- one at 4.9 percent, one at 5 percent -- you'd probably pick the latter.
BUSINESS
By MARKETWATCH | October 30, 2005
NEW YORK -- If inheritance is a major factor in your retirement equation, it might be wise to do the math again. The prediction of a huge generational transfer of wealth may, in fact, be a bust. At one time, experts forecast that the World War II generation - reputed to be a generation of savers - would pass on about $10 trillion in assets to their children, the baby boomers. The boomers - a generation of spenders - thought they could use their inheritance to pad their retirement, finance college education for their children or spend as they pleased.
BUSINESS
By Donald Saltz | February 7, 1992
Brokerage and mutual fund firms should love Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan when he talks about the possibility of lowering interest rates further.The declining rates during 1991 and now early '92 have been a boon to sellers of stocks and bonds, now sought after in increasing numbers by millions of folks who usually have large chunks of their savings in certificates of deposit at banks and savings institutions.The result is that firms such as T. Rowe Price Associates, Alex. Brown and Legg Mason have been reporting record sales and profits despite the recession.
BUSINESS
By JANE BRYANT QUINN | December 10, 2000
My mailboxes, both e- and snail, bring me every turn of the demographic wheel. Today, I'm hearing from those of you who woke up at 50 and said "Wow, I'm not 30 anymore." You knew you weren't saving enough for the future. But that always seemed so far away. There's an upside to hitting 50 with little or nothing in the bank. Your options clarify themselves. It gets hard not to save, because the danger eats at you. Even now, you can still shape the retirement you both desire and dread. But how?
BUSINESS
By Jonathan Lansner and Jonathan Lansner,Orange County Register | April 19, 1992
Spring. Taxes. Baseball. Dashed hopes of living up to New Year's resolutions. It may be the perfect time to check up on your finances.In recent weeks many savers have had to find receipts of 1991's income before shipping the shoe box to the accountant or tax preparer. So at least springtime is a time when financial figures are floating around a household.According to the experts, that makes this time of year -- rather than the traditional January surge in goal making -- an excellent opportunity to do a thorough financial housecleaning.
NEWS
April 25, 2013
It will be many years yet before historians can make their full assessment of the presidency of George W. Bush, but we have a sneaking suspicion their conclusions will not be nearly as generous as the puffery that has accompanied the opening of his presidential library this past week on the campus of Southern Methodist University. That's to be expected, of course. Presidential libraries have become less about housing presidential papers and more like modern (and enormous - at 226,000 square feet, the George W. Bush Presidential Library is bigger than the average Walmart)
BUSINESS
Jamie Smith Hopkins | May 2, 2012
Internal Fannie Mae documents show the mortgage financier was about to launch a principal reduction program in 2010 after determining that it would save taxpayers hundreds of millions of dollars, a Baltimore congressman says -- contradicting claims by Fannie's regulator that such a move would be costly. U.S. Reps. Elijah E. Cummings of Baltimore and John F. Tierney of Massachusetts, Democrats who sit on the House Committee on Oversight & Government Reform, sent a joint letter Tuesday to regulator Edward DeMarco demanding more information about why the program was "mysteriously terminated" in July 2010.
EXPLORE
April 6, 2012
The CareGiver's Ministry at Mount Zion United Methodist Church is hosting American Heart Association HeartSaver CPR and AED training classes, Saturday, April 21 from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at church Fellowship Hall, 12430 Scaggsville Road, in Highland. Course covers adult, infant and child CPR and use of an AED. A two-year AHA HeartSaver card will be awarded after successful completion of the class. Cost $40 includes lunch. Make checks payable to Mt. Zion UMC, with "CPR class" on memo line.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | February 14, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley's retooled proposal to limit development on septic tanks gets a hearing in Annapolis today, along with his other major green initiatives - increasing the "flush fee" to fix wastewater treatment plants and providing ratepayer subsidies to boost offshore wind energy projects. Lawmakers will hear from the governor on all three measures, but also from environmental and smart-growth activists, local officials, farmers and developers. Among those making a case for curbing low-density development on septics will be the Queen Anne's Conservation Association, which commissioned a study of growth trends in the Eastern Shore county just across the Bay Bridge from Annapolis.   You can view a YouTube summary of the study by Washington College here: Opposing the bill will be rural and some suburban officials, development and farming groups.  Interestingly, the Maryland Association of Counties, traditionally skeptical and even resistant of any state Smart Growth proposal, has decided to support the bill with amendments.  That may signify some support for the curbs among the more urban of the suburban counties, or it could be a ruse to appear supportive while proposing changes that effectively gut the legislation.  Carroll County 's commissioners, among the most vehemently opposed to any state role in curbing septics or limiting sprawl, take a hard line.  Richard Rothschild, vice president of the commissioners,...
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2011
Catonsville's Fourth of July parade is bound to be an impressive event Monday afternoon, with 17 marching bands, Lone Ranger look-alikes, wailing firetrucks, color guards, 25 floats and a renowned local waitress drifting by in a long red gown. But before that, unfolding as you read this, goes the spectacle of the chairs. To be more precise, the chairs, blankets, tarps, ropes, twine, steel cable, yellow "Caution" tape, bricks, stones and, at last count, two seated mannequins — one torso only, one whole figure — intended to reserve parade viewing spots.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2010
Low inflation is a welcome economic sign for spenders, but for savers, it can be too much of a good thing. The effect of super low inflation could be seen in recent days when the government announced changes to savings bond rates and retirement account limits that are pegged to inflation. Savers can now expect meager returns on the inflation-protected Series I Savings Bonds, if they even still want to buy them. And employees won't be able to sock away more next year in a 401(k)
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | August 19, 1993
Consumer confidence is in the tank, big companies continue to announce giant layoffs, polls show Americans think the economy is in rotten shape and they hate President Clinton's economic plan.So Wall Street's throwing a party.In the face of pervasive gloom on Main Streets across America, stock market indexes have been steadily climbing to record levels. The Dow Jones industrial average broke the 3,600 barrier yesterday for the first time, gaining 17.88 points to close at 3,604.86. The Nasdaq and American stock indexes also hit new highs yesterday.
SPORTS
By The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2010
Todd Pletcher didn't want to watch the Kentucky Derby with friends. He didn't want to watch it with family. He didn't want to pick one of the four owners he was representing and sit with them. In fact, he didn't even want to watch it live from the stands. He wanted to watch it alone, on television, inside the Horseman's Lounge, halfway down the tunnel beneath the grandstands. "Obviously, I needed to change something," said Pletcher, who entered Saturday's 136th Run for the Roses 0-for-24, the most attempts without a victory in the history of the race.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2010
It's not often Bob Baffert makes it to the barn when the first number on the clock is a six, much less a five. But there was Baffert at 5:50 a.m. Sunday morning, looking bright-eyed, satisfied and downright elated the day after winning his fifth Preakness with Lookin At Lucky. He was in such a good mood, he said, that he bounced out of bed and wanted to go straight to the barn. He was having so much fun talking to a handful of bleary-eyed reporters, he decided to parody Robert Duvall's famous line from "Apocalypse Now."
SPORTS
By Ken Murray, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2010
For two weeks, Todd Pletcher looked for signs that the Kentucky Derby had taken a toll on Super Saver — and found none. Not until the far turn at Pimlico Race Course on Saturday was there any indication Super Saver didn't have the right stuff to end racing's 32-year Triple Crown drought. And then, when jockey Calvin Borel asked the 3-year-old colt for more and got no response, Pletcher knew. Two weeks wasn't enough time. Super Saver became the fifth Derby winner in six years to fail to win the second leg of the Triple Crown when he faded to eighth in the Preakness stretch.
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