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By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | June 8, 1995
Carroll County has entered the hardware business and is scrambling for buyers. Profit would be tallied in water conservation, not dollars.Although prices are rock bottom for water conserving devices, sales are sluggish, said Catherine M. Rappe, chief of the water resource management bureau, which is selling the items at cost."
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NEWS
By Kathleen Purvis and Kathleen Purvis,McClatchy-Tribune | December 12, 2007
Saving water in the kitchen isn't just the right thing to do during a drought. It's the right thing to do all of the time. Sure, it's important to use clean water when we prepare food. But much of the water we use in our kitchens spills right down the sink, where it goes back to the water treatment plant without doing anyone any good. Getting into these habits not only saves water -- it can make your cooking more healthful and even tastier. Tips When you get a drink of water, don't run the faucet until the water is cool.
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NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | March 18, 2002
Anne Arundel County officials are dusting off a 1999 water conservation plan in anticipation of worsening drought conditions, especially in the northern tip of the county. Members of the county's Drought Emergency Coordinating Committee met Friday to discuss educating residents about the elements of the plan - which includes water-saving measures such as taking shorter showers and shaving with the tap shut off - as well as how restrictions might affect some county departments and services.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun reporter | September 16, 2007
The Maryland Department of the Environment is planning to use Mount Airy for a pilot study to see if its water-saving efforts this summer can be adopted throughout the state, according to John Grace, an MDE water supply division chief. "They've made great strides," Grace said of Mount Airy. Since Mount Airy enacted a mandatory outdoor water ban and distributed free reduced-flow fixtures and discounted rain barrels this summer, daily water use has dropped more than 100,000 gallons below the 855,000 gallons per day that the state currently permits, Mayor Frank M. Johnson said.
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2002
Virginia Novak stood outside her Roland Park home one recent afternoon and noticed something odd. No sprinklers. The mother of three usually sees at least a few sprinklers on her neighbors' lawns, but lately they have been a rare sight. She also has seen fewer people washing their cars. Novak suspects that her neighbors are heeding the city's recent request to save water. In response to continuing drought conditions, the city asked this month for voluntary water conservation measures, and many residents and businesses have obliged.
NEWS
By Cindy Parr and Cindy Parr,Contributing writer | January 19, 1992
A town government plan to save water with conservation kits appears to be a dry well.Despite several bans the last six years on outdoor water use, there is no groundswell of support for town efforts to conserve the resource."
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | March 18, 2002
Anne Arundel County officials are dusting off a 1999 water conservation plan in anticipation of worsening drought conditions, especially in the northern tip of the county. Members of the county's Drought Emergency Coordinating Committee met Friday to discuss educating residents about the elements of the plan - which includes water-saving measures such as taking shorter showers and shaving with the tap shut off - as well as how restrictions might affect some county departments and services.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | August 30, 2002
The potted black-eyed Susans were donated by a local nursery for back-to-school night. But in these water-pinching times, Mount Airy Elementary Principal Thomasina Piercy can't bring herself to water them - even with bottled H20. The plants are way beyond wilting and have lost their petals. The stems have turned crunchy and the leaves are brittle, prompting Piercy to hang a sign on the black bucket. "Mount Airy Elementary Gardening Club is conserving water!" it reads. "What are YOU doing to save water?"
NEWS
By Dan Berger | August 20, 1999
When Mother Earth devours her human children, she does not discriminate as they do on ethnicity, race, religion or political persuasion. Oh, how very inconsiderate.Cheer up. The candidates for mayor are better than their records.Thanks to the drought, more sharks are swimming up the bay. And you thought all our sharks were land animals.Save water. Bake, don't boil.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | August 23, 1999
George II for President! Hasn't snorted in years.If a great New York bank wants to launder billions for the Russian mob, it should at least charge proportionately as much as an ATM fee, just to be fair to the rest of us.Starr seems to want a final report that would accuse Mrs. Clinton without bearing his thumb print. Can't be done.Save water. Wash behind one ear at a time.Pub Date: 08/23/99
NEWS
By Denise Cowie and Denise Cowie,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 1, 2004
So you looked out the window after a thunderstorm and saw water pooling in your lawn, not running off into the gutter. Did you tsk-tsk and resolve to fill the depression with topsoil first chance you got? Or did you see it as an invitation to install a rain garden? If you chose the rain garden, take a bow. Not only will you have an attractive landscape feature, but you'll be doing your bit to cut down on water pollution, slow the rate of stream flooding in developed areas, and replenish groundwater.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | June 17, 2004
Water pressure in Taneytown bounced up to near normal almost immediately after the mayor imposed mandatory restrictions on most outdoor uses last Thursday, officials said yesterday. The restrictions were tightened Tuesday evening by Mayor W. Robert Flickinger, who changed the penalty for violating the restrictions that ban outdoor uses such as filling pools, washing cars and watering lawns. His new order eliminates a grace period that officials feared might increase water use. His original order provided for only warnings until Monday but now allows fines after one warning.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | August 30, 2002
The potted black-eyed Susans were donated by a local nursery for back-to-school night. But in these water-pinching times, Mount Airy Elementary Principal Thomasina Piercy can't bring herself to water them - even with bottled H20. The plants are way beyond wilting and have lost their petals. The stems have turned crunchy and the leaves are brittle, prompting Piercy to hang a sign on the black bucket. "Mount Airy Elementary Gardening Club is conserving water!" it reads. "What are YOU doing to save water?"
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | August 29, 2002
The drought that has drained residential wells, turned farm fields to dust and depleted streams and reservoirs has extended its reach into school classrooms as well. Two Carroll County elementary schools replaced drinking fountains with water coolers yesterday and served lunch on disposable trays to eliminate dish washing, after one school ran out of water twice this week and the other's well began kicking up mud and gravel. Carroll officials are so concerned about possible well failures at these and other schools that they're looking into using portable bathrooms at schools without water - and they're forming plans to run schools on split shifts in the event that some buildings must temporarily close for lack of water.
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2002
Virginia Novak stood outside her Roland Park home one recent afternoon and noticed something odd. No sprinklers. The mother of three usually sees at least a few sprinklers on her neighbors' lawns, but lately they have been a rare sight. She also has seen fewer people washing their cars. Novak suspects that her neighbors are heeding the city's recent request to save water. In response to continuing drought conditions, the city asked this month for voluntary water conservation measures, and many residents and businesses have obliged.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | June 6, 2002
Despite the return of normal rainfall to the Baltimore area since March, the city warned its water system customers yesterday to step up voluntary conservation or face mandatory curbs on water use. In renewing the call to conservation, public works officials noted that while the city has seen normal rainfall since March - and in April, above-normal rainfall - the system's three major reservoirs remain 35 percent below normal levels and the region remains...
NEWS
By Dan Berger | August 25, 1999
The Fed had to raise interest. Too many of us have jobs.Lawrence Bell spent $4,323 from campaign contributions in New York on clothes for himself and the establishment is scandalized that he went to Saks Fifth Avenue, not J. Press or Brooks Brothers.When Gov. Ventura refereed a pro wrestling bout, he demeaned 1. politics, 2. rassling, 3. Minnesota, 4. himself or 5. none of those. Choose one.Save water. Use dry ice.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | August 9, 1999
Save water. Drink prune juice.If the U.S. Treasury actually wants to pay off the national debt, Congress should let it.Cheer up. Blacks are coming out for O'Malley, whites for Bell and Stokes.Candidate Bell has put forth no issues or position papers but he did send his goons to disrupt a rival's street theater, so that must be his message, his promise and who he is.Pub Date: 8/09/99
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | March 18, 2002
Anne Arundel County officials are dusting off a 1999 water conservation plan in anticipation of worsening drought conditions, especially in the northern tip of the county. Members of the county's Drought Emergency Coordinating Committee met Friday to discuss educating residents about the elements of the plan - which includes water-saving measures such as taking shorter showers and shaving with the tap shut off - as well as how restrictions might affect some county departments and services.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | March 18, 2002
Anne Arundel County officials are dusting off a 1999 water conservation plan in anticipation of worsening drought conditions, especially in the northern tip of the county. Members of the county's Drought Emergency Coordinating Committee met Friday to discuss educating residents about the elements of the plan - which includes water-saving measures such as taking shorter showers and shaving with the tap shut off - as well as how restrictions might affect some county departments and services.
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