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By Anjetta McQueen and Anjetta McQueen,Fort Worth Star-Telegram | October 9, 1991
Want to save the world?Go shopping.Yes, shopping.On the newest front in the war against the world's ills, many fashion designers and retailers are lending their creations to various causes.Armed with credit card and checkbook, consumers can fight the good fight with silk shirts for the rain forest or tie-dyed socks for victims of the AIDS virus.Linda Allard, who designs the Ellen Tracy line, will be breaking the planet-on-a-T-shirt mode this fall with a rain forest print collection that includes an oversized silk blouse priced at $305.
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By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2013
Whatever else can be said about "Sean Saves the World," the Sean Hayes vehicle which premieres Thursday night on NBC, know that the sitcom doesn't treat sexuality with kid gloves. Take the explanation divorced gay dad Sean (played by out "Will & Grace" vet Hayes) gives his teenage daughter Ellie (Samantha Isler) when she asks -- in a convenient piece of pilot episode exposition -- how she came to be conceived. "Gay," Hayes says matter of factly. "Tried not to be. Was. Was again. Was one more time, because it was not unpleasant.
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By MICHAEL COLLIER | December 23, 2001
"Ever since I took to writing poems seriously," Nobel laureate Joseph Brodsky tells us, "I've tried to write a poem every Christmas -- as a sort of birthday greeting." The first, "Christmas Ballad," was written in 1962, and the last, "Flight Into Egypt (2)," in 1995, the year before Brodsky's death. The poems about the birth of Jesus -- 18 in all -- fill the recently published Nativity Poems. While the Nobel laureate is the translator of a few of his poems, most of them are rendered by distinguished contemporary poets, including Anthony Hecht, Paul Muldoon, Richard Wilbur, Glyn Maxwell and Nobel laureates Seamus Heaney and Derek Walcott.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | November 29, 2010
At the end of Thanksgiving dinner, I listened to a conversation between a 96-year-old woman and her 20-year-old grandson. There's nothing extraordinary about such a thing at a family gathering — except that the grandson was 3,500 miles away. A granddaughter had cleared away a dessert dish and replaced it with a laptop computer, and now the grandmother was able to see, hear and speak to her grandson in Europe. It was her first Skype Thanksgiving. Everyone in the house gathered around the table to watch, in a way reminiscent of the scene in Barry Levinson's "Avalon," in which the late-1940s living room fills with people who've come to see television for the first time.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,Sun Staff Writer | September 7, 1994
Alexander Ross starts a new job tomorrow that he knows could swallow him whole.At 8:30, he'll greet 30 or more sixth-graders in Room 309 of Booker T. Washington Middle School in inner-city Baltimore. Thus will begin Mr. Ross' career as a teacher.Mr. Ross is 22, a baby-faced, soft-spoken young man just three months out of Northwestern University, near Chicago. His students -- those who haven't been held back -- will be 12 and 13, charged with the electricity of early adolescence, all of them ebony to Mr. Ross' ivory.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Josh Mooney | December 13, 1991
TERMINATOR 2: JUDGMENT DAYLive Home Video$99.95One of the most expensive films ever made, "Terminator 2," the inevitable sequel, can at least boast that its approximately $90 million budget shows up on the screen, as it should. The special effects in this movie are spellbinding, as are most of the action sequences.Edward Furlong is a good choice to play the young John Connor, destined to save the human race unless a rival Terminator gets him first. Linda Hamilton, playing his mom, Sarah Connor, is pumped up for the part.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | November 11, 1994
ALEXANDRIA, Va. -- They are dying at a rate of 20 a day, the last American voices of the First World War.But as they fade away, the surviving U.S. veterans of "the war to end all wars" are fighting a lonely battle to save the national organization that for generations has bound them together.Of the 4.7 million Americans who served in World War I, fewer than 25,000 have endured the march of time and will today mark Veterans Day, which was established in part to remember the end of that conflict in 1918 on the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month.
NEWS
September 2, 1996
ACROSS THE globe, millions of people who don't trust their own government media believe the BBC. It is the Free World's most potent weapon against any "ism," the envy of other broadcasters and the most potent force in projecting British influence in a post-imperial world. Britain ought to be trying to strengthen the World Service of the British Broadcasting Corp. Instead, Britain is planning to dismantle it.The World Service is run with its own correspondents, production and bureaucracy separate from the BBC domestic organization.
FEATURES
By David J. Fox and David J. Fox,Los Angeles Times | December 16, 1991
THE GOLDEN Globe nominations for 1991's movies won't come out until Dec. 27.This year's Oscar nominations won't be announced until Feb. 19.And Hollywood hasn't even finished releasing this season's movies.So what is one of the hot topics in film industry circles?1992's movies.The talk comes amid a background of cloudy economic realities and budget tightening. Orion Pictures Corp. filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection on Wednesday, leaving question marks about the fate of its scheduled films.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | May 11, 1993
Karl Meyer drove his Peace House into Baltimore last week, for a two-day stop in a long journey that began 35 years ago when a shy farm boy from Vermont first acted on his great notions to save mankind.A few minor adjustments in thinking -- and several jail sentences -- later, the whiskered peace activist is still on the road, spreading his philosophy of nonviolence, simplicity and reverence for the earth.The Peace House is a symmetrical bulk of copper and wood that Meyer, a carpenter, erected on a Ford flatbed truck.
NEWS
By Stephen G. Henderson and Stephen G. Henderson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 4, 2007
Although she sells a lot of bottled water and soft drinks at Sofi's Crepes, her smaller-than-small shop on Charles Street, Ann Costlow couldn't find room for a recycling bin to process the empties. She couldn't, that is, until she began getting complaints from her customers. "I was like, `Yeah-yeah-yeah, that's great for others, but I don't have the space.' " Costlow said. "But, more and more people started asking me, `Do you recycle?' It became this nagging, ankle-biting thing, until finally, I realized I was beginning to look like I didn't care about the Earth."
NEWS
By Robert Koulish | July 22, 2007
Former Vice President Al Gore and rock star Bono come from vastly different backgrounds, but this summer they have a lot in common. Each has been engaged in an extraordinary promotional campaign for a social cause, culminating in a highly commercialized media spectacle. For Mr. Gore, it was the Live Earth concert; for Bono, it was a special issue of Vanity Fair that he edited, featuring the Red Campaign to bring heightened awareness of Africa's AIDS epidemic. These efforts are changing the face of grass-roots politics, perhaps even forcing society to reconsider what it means to be politically involved.
BUSINESS
By Humberto Cruz and Humberto Cruz,Tribune Media Services | January 14, 2007
In half the time it takes Jack Bauer to save the world (the indefatigable federal agent from the 24 television series does it in 24 hours), I was saved from losing sight of what personal finance is all about. My rescuer: Rachael, a young hotel waitress who approached the table where my wife, Georgina, and I were having breakfast and asked whether we needed anything else. The following, taking me from disenchantment to rediscovery, takes place between 8 p.m. and 8 a.m. during a recent hotel stay to attend a conference on personal finance: 8 p.m.: I register and pick up the conference program, an inch-thick packet filled with glowing speaker biographies and copies of elaborate, graphics-filled presentations they would make over the next two days.
NEWS
By STEPHEN KIEHL and STEPHEN KIEHL,SUN REPORTER | July 23, 2006
The following takes place between 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. There's a line of a hundred people outside the Sound Garden music store in Fells Point, on a Wednesday. In an age of digital music downloads, this is odd. Even stranger, several hundred more people are jammed inside the store. They are a notch cooler than the fans you'd find at a Star Trek convention, but just a notch. In a moment, it all becomes clear. A black Lincoln Town Car ba-bumps down the cobblestone street, stops in front of the store and discharges the coolest customer Sound Garden has maybe ever seen.
FEATURES
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2004
If these presidential candidates had their way, there would be no littering, no school, no guns, and a movie theater in every basement. The driving age would be 10. There would be "mass production of peaceful video games." Homeless children would live in the White House, which would be robin's-egg blue. So said hundreds of children from across the state - and a few outside it - who were asked to complete the sentence, "If I Were President." The answers are collected in a new book with that title published by the Children's Guild, a school for emotionally disturbed children with campuses in Baltimore, Annapolis and Prince George's County.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | April 7, 2004
LET IT be said at the very beginning of the column that the sound of Americans waxing goofy over nanotechnology has a refreshing, springlike chirp to it. Given our grief from the last investment that was going to change everything and enrich everybody - the Internet - the growing volume of nanotech moon dust can be seen as a sign that the nation's risk-seeking, innovative, can-do spirit has revived. It can also be seen as a sign that Wall Street thinks we have the perception and attention span of Chihuahuas.
NEWS
By Dennis T. Avery | August 29, 1997
CHURCHVILLE, VA. -- If you want to save forests, recycling paper can help a little. Growing trees faster can help a lot.The world is already using the high-yield approach in farming. That's why we're now feeding twice as many people from the same cropland we used in 1960.Higher crop yields are now saving more than 10 million square miles of global forests from the plow. The good news is that fast-growing trees can be just as powerful a conservation tool as high-yield wheat and rice.By planting fast-growing trees -- and helping them grow even faster with good management -- we should be able to double the per-acre wood yield from American forestry over the next 70 years.
BUSINESS
By Humberto Cruz and Humberto Cruz,Tribune Media Services | January 14, 2007
In half the time it takes Jack Bauer to save the world (the indefatigable federal agent from the 24 television series does it in 24 hours), I was saved from losing sight of what personal finance is all about. My rescuer: Rachael, a young hotel waitress who approached the table where my wife, Georgina, and I were having breakfast and asked whether we needed anything else. The following, taking me from disenchantment to rediscovery, takes place between 8 p.m. and 8 a.m. during a recent hotel stay to attend a conference on personal finance: 8 p.m.: I register and pick up the conference program, an inch-thick packet filled with glowing speaker biographies and copies of elaborate, graphics-filled presentations they would make over the next two days.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MICHAEL COLLIER | December 23, 2001
"Ever since I took to writing poems seriously," Nobel laureate Joseph Brodsky tells us, "I've tried to write a poem every Christmas -- as a sort of birthday greeting." The first, "Christmas Ballad," was written in 1962, and the last, "Flight Into Egypt (2)," in 1995, the year before Brodsky's death. The poems about the birth of Jesus -- 18 in all -- fill the recently published Nativity Poems. While the Nobel laureate is the translator of a few of his poems, most of them are rendered by distinguished contemporary poets, including Anthony Hecht, Paul Muldoon, Richard Wilbur, Glyn Maxwell and Nobel laureates Seamus Heaney and Derek Walcott.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 12, 2001
Say what you will about John F. Kennedy, but the bottom line is that, were it not for him, you probably wouldn't be reading this newspaper right now. For it was under his watch that the world stood as close to the nuclear brink as it ever should. His refusal to make a rash decision that he simply couldn't embrace is why we still get to talk about nuclear war in the abstract. That's what leadership is all about, and that's the crux of "Thirteen Days," a terrifically engrossing war film in which not a single shot is fired, a movie about shaping events rather than being shaped by them.
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