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NEWS
August 2, 2009
On July 23, 2009, Leonard Gilbert, A family memorial service was held on July 24 in Florida. Contributions in Lenny's memory may be sent to SAVE THE CHILDREN FEDERATION www.savethechildren.org/
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NEWS
August 2, 2009
On July 23, 2009, Leonard Gilbert, A family memorial service was held on July 24 in Florida. Contributions in Lenny's memory may be sent to SAVE THE CHILDREN FEDERATION www.savethechildren.org/
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NEWS
November 15, 2003
On November 11, 2003, MARGARET W. (nee Warner); wife of John E. Deford, Jr.; mother of John E. Deford, III, Cooper D. Deford and Michael W. Deford; grandmother of Henry, Michael, Sam and Megan. Interment private. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be sent to Save the Children, 54 Wilton Road, Westport, CT 06880.
NEWS
January 10, 2009
The United Nations Children's Fund estimates that 2 million children have died in wars in the past decade: Somalia, Afghanistan, Darfur, Colombia, Iraq, Congo. And today Israel and Hamas militants are battling. In southern Israel, scores of children have been terrorized by a barrage of Hamas rockets. In the Gaza Strip, children are dying. Of the nearly 700 killed there, more than 100 are children, according to published reports. Countless others have been injured. Thousands of children who have escaped injury are suffering from a lack of food, safe housing, clean water and medical care.
NEWS
May 7, 2008
What's the best place in the world to be a mother? According to Save the Children, which compared the well-being of mothers and children in 146 countries, it's Sweden. On the other hand, there won't be too many happy Mother's Days this year in Niger, which ranked last among countries surveyed on measures of maternal and child health and well-being. Consider this comparison between the two nations: Skilled health personnel are present at almost every birth in Sweden, while only 33 percent of births are attended in Niger.
NEWS
By Bill McCauley and Bill McCauley,SUN STAFF | November 20, 2003
Before Iraq, before Afghanistan, before Ghana, Malawi or Peru, Mark Fritzler found himself in Nepal. The Peace Corps took him there in 1966 to teach farmers better growing techniques. Here he was, a young American with a degree in political science and international relations from the University of Oregon, trying to grow little plots of cauliflower, cabbage and tomatoes in the most mountainous place on Earth. The local farmers were not impressed. "I was greeted with skepticism," he says.
NEWS
January 10, 2009
The United Nations Children's Fund estimates that 2 million children have died in wars in the past decade: Somalia, Afghanistan, Darfur, Colombia, Iraq, Congo. And today Israel and Hamas militants are battling. In southern Israel, scores of children have been terrorized by a barrage of Hamas rockets. In the Gaza Strip, children are dying. Of the nearly 700 killed there, more than 100 are children, according to published reports. Countless others have been injured. Thousands of children who have escaped injury are suffering from a lack of food, safe housing, clean water and medical care.
NEWS
November 3, 2005
It's easy to forget the children of the Allai Valley. They live in a part of the world that many of us couldn't find on a map. A ferocious earthquake flattened their remote, mountainous villages in northwest Pakistan. Survivors of the Oct. 8 quake that killed more than 73,000 people - nearly half were children - are among the 1.9 million victims who lack the basics to survive, specifically food and shelter. Couple that grim statistic with the disparity in emergency aid pledged for the relief effort and actual dollars in hand and you have a post-quake calamity in the making as the Himalayan winter approaches.
NEWS
January 6, 2005
MORE THAN a third of the victims killed during the South Asian tsunamis were children -- but the worry now is for the children who lived. Lost, separated from their families, orphaned, these youngest survivors need food, water and shelter just like the tens of thousands of others devastated by the disaster. The plight of these most fragile victims has generated an outpouring of aid -- and, tragically, made them easy targets for the nefarious child traffickers operating in that part of the world.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 19, 2005
BANDA ACEH, Indonesia - Toddlers stacked building blocks into towers. Five- and 6-year-olds played board games, paged through storybooks and chased one another in circles. Teenage girls in headscarves and skirts sat cross-legged side by side, whispering in each other's ears and giggling. These might be scenes from children playing almost anywhere in the world. But here, where the violent shaking of the earth and a giant wave made it seem that the world was about to come to an end, the sights and sounds of children's play and laughter this week were nothing short of remarkable, as refreshing and rare for residents as a cool breeze in this steamy city at the northern tip of Sumatra island.
NEWS
May 7, 2008
What's the best place in the world to be a mother? According to Save the Children, which compared the well-being of mothers and children in 146 countries, it's Sweden. On the other hand, there won't be too many happy Mother's Days this year in Niger, which ranked last among countries surveyed on measures of maternal and child health and well-being. Consider this comparison between the two nations: Skilled health personnel are present at almost every birth in Sweden, while only 33 percent of births are attended in Niger.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo | November 25, 2006
The plea of 16-year-old Gamesh was simply stated: "Please open the school again. The war is between adults, but it affects us children. Both parties are violating our rights." In Nepal, where this teenager lives, a decade old civil war and Maoist insurgency have caused havoc - 20 percent of all primary age children don't go to school. Gamesh's plea - quoted in a report from Save the Children, an independent organization devoted to meeting children's needs worldwide - reflects the reality of so many more children across the globe.
NEWS
November 3, 2005
It's easy to forget the children of the Allai Valley. They live in a part of the world that many of us couldn't find on a map. A ferocious earthquake flattened their remote, mountainous villages in northwest Pakistan. Survivors of the Oct. 8 quake that killed more than 73,000 people - nearly half were children - are among the 1.9 million victims who lack the basics to survive, specifically food and shelter. Couple that grim statistic with the disparity in emergency aid pledged for the relief effort and actual dollars in hand and you have a post-quake calamity in the making as the Himalayan winter approaches.
NEWS
March 11, 2005
Elizabeth Anne Rowan, a volunteer for local charities, died of Alzheimer's disease Monday at Somerford Place in Columbia, where she lived for the past year. The former Roland Park resident was 86. Born Elizabeth Anne Hopper in Merion, Pa., she was a 1936 Shipley School graduate who earned a nursing degree from the University of Virginia. She had been a maternity nurse at the Bryn Mawr Hospital in suburban Philadelphia before her 1954 marriage to Stephen Clegg Rowan Jr., a federal real estate appraiser and retired Army major who was a veteran of World War II and Korea.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 19, 2005
BANDA ACEH, Indonesia - Toddlers stacked building blocks into towers. Five- and 6-year-olds played board games, paged through storybooks and chased one another in circles. Teenage girls in headscarves and skirts sat cross-legged side by side, whispering in each other's ears and giggling. These might be scenes from children playing almost anywhere in the world. But here, where the violent shaking of the earth and a giant wave made it seem that the world was about to come to an end, the sights and sounds of children's play and laughter this week were nothing short of remarkable, as refreshing and rare for residents as a cool breeze in this steamy city at the northern tip of Sumatra island.
NEWS
January 6, 2005
MORE THAN a third of the victims killed during the South Asian tsunamis were children -- but the worry now is for the children who lived. Lost, separated from their families, orphaned, these youngest survivors need food, water and shelter just like the tens of thousands of others devastated by the disaster. The plight of these most fragile victims has generated an outpouring of aid -- and, tragically, made them easy targets for the nefarious child traffickers operating in that part of the world.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | May 10, 2002
In Baltimore City Court overturns conviction in death of 7-month-old girl An appellate court overturned yesterday the second-degree murder conviction and 30-year prison term of a Southwest Baltimore man who was convicted last year of killing his girlfriend's infant daughter. A three-judge panel of the Court of Special Appeals ruled that Charles Donnell Johnson is entitled to a new trial in the fatal beating July 18, 2000, of 7-month-old Destiny Way while he was baby-sitting, according to court papers.
NEWS
September 13, 2004
Four children killed in S.C. mobile home fire GILBERT, S.C. - Four young children died when fire engulfed their rural mobile home, and state investigators were called in to help determine the cause of the blaze, officials said yesterday. The home outside Gilbert was engulfed in flames when emergency crews arrived Saturday afternoon. "They [mobile homes] can burn pretty rapidly. There was nothing they could do to save the children who were in the home," said Lexington County sheriff's Capt.
NEWS
By Bill McCauley and Bill McCauley,SUN STAFF | November 20, 2003
Before Iraq, before Afghanistan, before Ghana, Malawi or Peru, Mark Fritzler found himself in Nepal. The Peace Corps took him there in 1966 to teach farmers better growing techniques. Here he was, a young American with a degree in political science and international relations from the University of Oregon, trying to grow little plots of cauliflower, cabbage and tomatoes in the most mountainous place on Earth. The local farmers were not impressed. "I was greeted with skepticism," he says.
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