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NEWS
By Kevin Harrison | November 12, 1995
The volunteers: Diana Smith, her husband, Donald Kintzing, and son Luke Kappers help run the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's Save The Bay Shop.They arrived in Annapolis two years ago from suburban Cleveland, on the shores of Lake Erie, bringing with them an interest in preserving the environment and the body of water they live near.A year later, Ms. Smith and Mr. Kintzing shared the store's volunteer of the year award. Luke, a senior at St. Mary's High School, works at the shop and volunteers for Pets on Wheels, visiting Ginger Cove nursing home patients.
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NEWS
May 7, 2014
As I have written before, no one will mention one of the major solutions to the problem of preserving the state's crab population, which I believe stems from a fear of offending the commercial waterman ( "Singing the blues," May 5). At least five years ago recreational crabbers had our catches reduced from two bushels to one, a 50 percent reduction. Nor can recreational crabbers any longer keep female crabs. Yet commercial crabbers are still allowed to catch and keep female crabs, and their catches haven't been reduced by half.
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NEWS
By J. Charles Fox | September 20, 2005
Early European explorers launched many expeditions into the Atlantic, most of which were unsuccessful until they discovered the relative safety and reliability of the trade winds. Today's Chesapeake cleanup leaders need a more reliable course to save the bay, and it can be found in our nation's past success in controlling pollution. Twenty-two years ago, the Chesapeake Bay cleanup program began as a voluntary effort to control pollution and restore living marine resources. Two decades later, the Chesapeake Bay Program has little to show for itself.
NEWS
By Gerald W. Winegrad | December 15, 2013
Thirty years ago, the governors in Maryland, Virginia and Pennsylvania; the mayor of D.C.; and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency administrator signed the first Chesapeake Bay Agreement, solemnly pledging to stem the flow of pollutants and bring the bay into compliance with the Clean Water Act. As a state senator, I optimistically witnessed this event and thought the job would be done in a decade. But today - after more detailed pledges to reduce nutrients, sediment and toxic chemicals - we are still far from meeting these commitments.
NEWS
By Debra Taylor Young and Debra Taylor Young,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 5, 2001
THE FAMILIAR slogan "Save the Bay" has been brought to life by Pam Sherfy's fourth-grade class at Linton Springs Elementary School. Sherfy's fourth-graders incorporated into their lessons development of a wetland on school property, a project that became a valuable lesson for Sherfy's class and for the school. Sherfy's project began when she learned that an area on school grounds was designated as a wetland but the water had been drained into a stream. Sherfy's class decided to restore the wetland.
NEWS
By Kevin Harrison | July 17, 1994
CYNTHIA KOPKOWSKI OF SEVERNVolunteer work: Cynthia volunteers at the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's Save the Bay Shop in Annapolis, assisting customers with purchases, working the cash register, typing correspondence and helping with inventory.She recently began working for HAVEN (HIV/AIDS Volunteer Enrichment Network), a nonprofit organization that assists AIDS patients. She has been named executive board secretary.About the volunteer: Cynthia will enter her senior year at Archbishop Spalding High School in the fall and plans to attend college and major in journalism.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | May 28, 1998
RONNIE DOVE has spent a lifetime in song, but now he's written an anthem. The first crowds to listen have given him rousing ovations, when their real instinct might be to stand and salute. The song is called "Save the Bay," and it's a warning cry from the edge of the Chesapeake's watery grave."When I read those first stories last summer about the dead fish and the Pfiesteria," Dove was saying yesterday in Pasadena, "it just killed me. It's horrible. I couldn't imagine our bay not producing beautiful fish and crabs and rockfish.
NEWS
By Robert Lee and Robert Lee,Staff writer | October 1, 1990
It was an institutional love-fest Friday at Severna Park's Valu Food, where key representatives from Valu Food, Alcoa Aluminum, the county Board of Education and the Chesapeake Bay Foundation flocked to inaugurate a statewide "Save Aluminum Cans -- Save the Bay" program.All four groups are cooperating to encourage recycling under the assumption that if you make a popular cause convenient, almost anybody will get involved. All 12 of Maryland's Valu Food locations and all 121 schools in the county school system have agreed to collect aluminum cans.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 17, 2003
Baltimore now has at least two - count 'em, two - restaurants that specialize in cuisine from Nepal. Mount Everest opened in Parkville last October. And this week, Kumari should open right smack-dab in the middle of downtown. For first-time restaurant owner Mohan Thapa, it's a dream come true. Thapa has spent the last 12 years working in several Baltimore-area restaurants - most recently at Bombay Grill. All the while, he says, he was working his way to his goal of bringing some of his native Nepal to his new home here.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | May 7, 1999
IT IS ONE OF THE MORE ironic signs of our times -- a four-wheel drive, a pickup or a minivan sporting a bumper sticker that says "Save The Bay" or a license plate proclaiming "Treasure the Chesapeake."It's a common enough sight, as all have gotten very popular.The pickups, vans and "sport utility vehicles" like Jeeps, Suburbans and Explorers have burgeoned from 20 million in the 1970s to 65 million nationwide. They account for half of all passenger vehicles sold each year.Membership in environmental groups such as the Chesapeake Bay Foundation (slogan, Save The Bay)
NEWS
July 7, 2013
In response to the op-ed written by Dee Hodges ("Focusing on the wrong threat to the bay," July 4), I must disagree. She recently attended a forum where I spoke in detail about Chesapeake Bay pollution. I made it very clear that the sources of pollution to the bay are varied and that all must be addressed or the bay cleanup will fail. Pollution of the bay comes from many sources and is caused by many pollutants. Air pollution contributes 30 percent of nitrogen; sewage treatment plants must be made more efficient, thus the Bay Restoration Fee (flush tax)
EXPLORE
Letter to The Aegis | May 23, 2013
Editor: I, like most everyone in the People's Republic of Maryland, have grown weary of "O'Taxes," which essentially translates to our esteemed governor taxing every aspect of our lives. While he's probably hard at work trying to determine a new tax on the very air we breathe, and trying to find a back door into the White House, his last insult, the rainwater run-off tax is laughable at best. First and foremost, it will do absolutely nothing to cleanse the waters of Chesapeake Bay, which despite the billions already spent, is in worse shape now that it was when the first studies were done more than a century ago. Yep, that money went mostly for studies.
NEWS
By Kim Coble | April 29, 2013
The Chesapeake Bay Foundation's recently released 2012 State of the Bay Report tells us the health of the Chesapeake Bay has improved 14 percent since 2008. But that doesn't tell the whole story. Throughout Pennsylvania, Maryland and Virginia, we hear about local governments, businesses and citizens rolling up their sleeves to reduce pollution from all sectors: agriculture, sewage treatment plants, and urban and suburban runoff. They are working to restore local rivers and streams.
NEWS
By Tom Horton | September 24, 2012
"If the world were merely seductive, that would be easy," wrote essayist E.B. White; "and if it were merely challenging that would be no problem. But I arise in the morning torn between a desire to improve the world and a desire to enjoy the world. "This makes it hard to plan the day. " We know what White meant. But sometimes nature allows no waffling; like the weekend when she suffused the Chesapeake Bay with such glory there was nothing for it but to stop saving the world and simply revel in it. We launched on a golden, placid morning from Bishops Head, a peninsula dangling from the marshy underbelly of Dorchester County.
NEWS
July 19, 2012
Chesapeake Bay Foundation Executive Director Alison Prost mentioedn some good ideas in her recent op-ed, but what's more important is what she didn't say ("New pollution regulations aren't enough for the Chesapeake Bay," July 15). She didn't mention, for example, that the bay's poor condition is partly due to the timid recommendations the foundation has been issuing for 45 years, like buying local meat and planting bay-friendly landscapes, which produce only cosmetic reductions in pollutants.
NEWS
February 23, 2012
I am appalled to learn that Maryland has forced the elimination of phosphorus from liquid injector tree fertilizer. It is the phosphorus that is most important to root development. A mature tree will certainly use all the phosphorus injected into the soil with nothing left to harm the Chesapeake Bay. It is this lack of proper root development that has made falling trees, once rare, now a common occurrence. I should not have to quote tree experts on the importance of feeding trees anymore than I should have to quote nutrition experts on the importance of feeding humans.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | March 4, 2005
Here's Joe Ecofriendly, thinking about how to save the bay: Identify pollution problems, using good science. Educate polluters, politicians and the public about solutions. Provide technical support and funding. We're all in this together. Together we can save the bay. Truth be told, Joe Eco's a tad frustrated that after two decades of this, the bay's not much better. But hey, the polls show a large majority of people care about the environment, so we must be on the right track. This all draws a cynical laugh from Dennis King, a University of Maryland economist who has this to say about the array of bay-saving government agencies, nonprofits and public-private partnerships: "A lot of nice people, but who's going to kick ass?"
NEWS
December 10, 2000
Stop treating Patapsco River as a sewer Thank you to Dan Rodricks for having the fortitude to blast Bethlehem Steel for its outrageous pollution of the Patapsco River ("It's time to stop dumping legalities, toxins in the bay," Nov. 29). Still, it's no wonder that Bethlehem Steel feels free to dump whatever it wants, for as long as it wants, given the attitude of our local and state governments. For decades, both environmental regulators and economic development officials have regarded the Patapsco River as nothing more than a giant industrial sewer.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler | February 23, 2012
Has Gov.Martin O'Malley's broad array of tax increase proposals got you bummed out? Cheer up, there's a bright spot. If Mr. O'Malley succeeds in his plan to impose Maryland's 6 percent sales tax on the purchase of gasoline, he will not only boost revenues for long-overdue highway, bridge and mass transit projects but possibly help clean the Chesapeake Bay at the same time - a formula that could work not just in Maryland but in all of the bay...
NEWS
By Tom Horton | January 4, 2012
What can we say about the half-acre of stream valley forest that developer William Tarbutton recently, blatantly bulldozed near Federalsburg on Maryland's Eastern Shore? He will likely be fined by the Maryland Department of the Environment, which has recently proposed $240,000 in fines for previous violations by the Easton developer. He might get sued by adjoining landowner Charles Long, whose forest was part of what Mr. Tarbutton knocked down - "but I don't know if it's worth the lawyers' fees," Mr. Long said.
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