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By Ann LoLordo | October 5, 1991
When Edward E. Sommerfeldt boards a bus for the Save Our Cities march on Washington Oct. 12, he will be motivated by what he sees every day in his classroom at Coppin State College -- the lack of computer skills in students educated in Baltimore.Illya Szilak also wants the federal government to pump more money into America's cash-poor cities. As with Mr. Sommerfeldt, her reasons spring from personal experience. The 23-year-old research technician has been helping a single mother to stay out of the ranks of Baltimore's homeless.
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NEWS
By Robert Wilson | July 12, 1999
YOU LIVE in a battered neighborhood in an aging city -- Buffalo or Baltimore, Hartford, Conn., or Detroit. Next door or down the street is an abandoned house where crack is being sold or squatters congregate or fires are set. If you complain, the chances are pretty good that your local government will respond by tearing down the house, using federal grants from the Department of Housing and Urban Development, state demolition money or even city revenue.Obviously...
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NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,Staff Writer | March 11, 1993
More than 100 church and community leaders met in the basement of a West Baltimore church yesterday to begin devising a strategy for creating 3,000 public works jobs in city neighborhoods.The meeting was called by the local branch of Save Our Cities, a national group that last year sponsored a March on Washington to urge more federal spending to revitalize America's crumbling inner cities.Those at the meeting hope to get an unspecified amount of federal money and some $250,000 to $500,000 from private sources to create 3,000 neighborhood-based jobs with annual salaries of at least $15,000 and to provide workers with training and literacy skills.
NEWS
By Nola N. Krosch | June 8, 1995
MAYOR KURT Schmoke has been actively spreading the word about his plans for making Baltimore a more livable city, and explaining how the $100 million in Empowerment Zone funding will help this effort.For years, the government has thrown money at problems in poor communities with very limited success. This time officials say things will be different: The Empowerment Zone money will be used to help develop jobs. That's a laudable goal since a chief cause of poverty is unemployment. But I'd like to see city officials go beyond finding remedies for joblessness and concentrate too on the inner-city infrastructure that helps to foster crime, drug addiction, anti-social behavior and poverty.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,Staff Writer | June 24, 1993
The local Save Our Cities chapter kicked off a drive yesterday to raise money to create 3,000 public works jobs.Dubbed "Dollars For Jobs," the campaign seeks to raise $250,000 from individuals, communities and corporations, said former Rep. Parren J. Mitchell, co-chairman of the local chapter, at a news conference at Baltimore City Hall.Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke pledged a matching grant of $250,000 in municipal funds.The first day of the drive netted $2,517, said co-chairwoman Sister Katherine Corr.
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Evening Sun Staff | September 25, 1991
Saying that the revitalization of Baltimore and other cities requires a "sustained federal response," Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke is backing an Oct. 12 march on Washington to call attention to the desperate condition of America's urban centers.The Save Our Cities march is intended to bring together 10,000 Baltimoreans and delegations from other cities in a rally outside the Capitol in an attempt to move cities into a priority spot on the national agenda."The country has to listen to the pain of people in the cities and respond to it in a positive way," Schmoke said yesterday.
NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,Evening Sun Staff | October 9, 1991
Residents of Baltimore were to take the first steps today toward what they hope will become a national movement to rescue cities from federal neglect.After a rally at Carroll Park in southwest Baltimore, about 100 local residents were to begin a three-day, 38-mile walk to Washington. They hope to be joined there by as many as 10,000 people Saturday for a Save Our Cities rally at the U.S. Capitol.Saturday's rally will be a prelude to a national Save Our Cities march on Washington in April sponsored by the U.S. Conference of Mayors.
NEWS
By Martin C. Evans | September 25, 1991
Baltimore's Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke, who yesterday accused President George Bush of ignoring the plight of urban America, said he would help lead an Oct. 12 rally in Washington to press for greater federal aid to cope with crime, poor housing and other ills plaguing U.S. cities."
NEWS
October 8, 1991
Travelers who pass through rail or bus terminals in major cities like New York and San Francisco cannot fail to be struck by the large number of homeless people who have taken shelter there -- a concentration of human misery that grew alarmingly during the past decade.Baltimore, luckily, may get a jump on the problem before it reaches epidemic proportions. The federal Department of Transportation recently awarded the city a $600,000 grant to help it cope with the homeless influx around the busy Lexington and Howard street subway and bus stops.
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,Sun Staff Writer | June 12, 1994
Seven Baltimore ministers began asking city church-goers yesterday to raise $250,000 for Dollars for Jobs/Save Our Cities, a national nonprofit program that promises to create about 3,000 public service jobs locally.Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke said he will add another $250,000 if the churches do their share.When the $500,000 goal is reached, attempts to win public service jobs for many of the city's unemployed will begin."I won't lie to you, we are living in disastrous times, when a 3-year-old gets gunned down standing on his doorstep and when young men are dropping out of the schoolhouse and entering the jail house, these are disastrous times," said the Rev. Carl W. Simmons Jr., associate minister of Mount Lebanon Baptist Church on Reisterstown Road.
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,Sun Staff Writer | June 12, 1994
Seven Baltimore ministers began asking city church-goers yesterday to raise $250,000 for Dollars for Jobs/Save Our Cities, a national nonprofit program that promises to create about 3,000 public service jobs locally.Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke said he will add another $250,000 if the churches do their share.When the $500,000 goal is reached, attempts to win public service jobs for many of the city's unemployed will begin."I won't lie to you, we are living in disastrous times, when a 3-year-old gets gunned down standing on his doorstep and when young men are dropping out of the schoolhouse and entering the jail house, these are disastrous times," said the Rev. Carl W. Simmons Jr., associate minister of Mount Lebanon Baptist Church on Reisterstown Road.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,Staff Writer | June 24, 1993
The local Save Our Cities chapter kicked off a drive yesterday to raise money to create 3,000 public works jobs.Dubbed "Dollars For Jobs," the campaign seeks to raise $250,000 from individuals, communities and corporations, said former Rep. Parren J. Mitchell, co-chairman of the local chapter, at a news conference at Baltimore City Hall.Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke pledged a matching grant of $250,000 in municipal funds.The first day of the drive netted $2,517, said co-chairwoman Sister Katherine Corr.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,Staff Writer | March 11, 1993
More than 100 church and community leaders met in the basement of a West Baltimore church yesterday to begin devising a strategy for creating 3,000 public works jobs in city neighborhoods.The meeting was called by the local branch of Save Our Cities, a national group that last year sponsored a March on Washington to urge more federal spending to revitalize America's crumbling inner cities.Those at the meeting hope to get an unspecified amount of federal money and some $250,000 to $500,000 from private sources to create 3,000 neighborhood-based jobs with annual salaries of at least $15,000 and to provide workers with training and literacy skills.
NEWS
By A. Robert Kaufman | May 28, 1992
SINCE THE 1950s I've participated in most of the civil rights and anti-war marches on Washington, as well as a few anti-poverty, labor solidarity, women's rights and gay rights marches.I did not, however, join the May 16th "Save Our Cities -- Save Our Children" March on Washington. I didn't have the heart to.It was not because I don't agree whole-heartedly and unreservedly with its message: demanding that our "representatives" in Congress and the White House revise spending priorities from the military to the civilian sector, especially to the needs of inner-city youth.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,Staff Writer | May 17, 1992
A photo caption in yesterday's late editions misidentified Osborne Elliott, one of the organizers of Saturday's "Save Our Cities" march on Washington.WASHINGTON -- They came out of civic pride, out of anger and out of fear. They came to say that Baltimore and other cities are part of America and must be saved, whatever the cost.They came to say that cities are people, full of life, capable of dreaming and still willing to believe in brotherhood.But they came without illusions. They heard an impassioned Baltimore Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke say during a speech on Capitol Hill:"We don't want to have to burn our cities.
NEWS
By GARLAND L. THOMPSON | May 16, 1992
The ''Save Our Cities'' campaign is back in the news. Parren J. Mitchell, a former congressman who now looks like a prophet, led the urban activists' first march on Washington last October, but the Clarence Thomas-Anita Hill show stole all the thunder on Capitol Hill. The country, mesmerized by the bizarre spectacle on C-Span, ignored the clear warnings about the sad state of American cities one more time, just as such warnings had been ignored all through the 1980s.The L.A. riots, in a flaming ''amen'' to the last line in a Langston Hughes poem asking ''What happens to a dream deferred,'' put city dwellers' needs back onto the front pages.
NEWS
By Jack L. Levin | September 17, 1991
THE priority of Baltimore's "Save Our Cities" march on Washington Oct. 12 is enshrined in the First Amendment to the Constitution, in the guarantee that "Congress shall make no law . . . abridging . . . the right of the people peaceably to assemble and to petition the government for a redress of grievances."And Baltimore and most other cities have many grievances to be redressed. Consider some of them:Between 1980 and 1991, essential federal capital grants to Baltimore city plummeted from $475 million to $42 million, a drop of $433 million -- or 97 percent.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Staff Writer | May 15, 1992
Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke accused Democratic leaders of the U.S. House of Representatives yesterday of playing "cotton-candy politics" with the problems of the cities."
NEWS
May 15, 1992
Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke wants no part of a cozy consensus between the White House and the Democratic leadership in Congress in dealing with Los Angeles and the urban crisis it illuminated. He said as much in a private meeting Wednesday with House Speaker Tom Foley, asserting that anything less than the declaration of a national emergency permitting the shift of funds from defense to domestic needs would amount to "a fraud and a sham." Then he went public with his harsh complaints, telling Baltimore community activists yesterday that lawmakers were playing "cotton-candy politics" with America's troubled big cities.
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