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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 31, 2006
SAVANNAH, Ga. -- A Coast Guard official said Saturday that an oil spill this month in the Savannah River has turned out to be much larger than originally thought after two weeks of assessment. Petty Officer Bobby Nash, a spokesman for the Coast Guard District 7, said the spill is estimated to be between 20,000 and 22,000 gallons, about 15,000 gallons more than the previous estimate. Nash said the source of the July 17 spill that shut down a 12-mile stretch of the river and part of the Intracoastal Waterway remains unknown.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 31, 2006
SAVANNAH, Ga. -- A Coast Guard official said Saturday that an oil spill this month in the Savannah River has turned out to be much larger than originally thought after two weeks of assessment. Petty Officer Bobby Nash, a spokesman for the Coast Guard District 7, said the spill is estimated to be between 20,000 and 22,000 gallons, about 15,000 gallons more than the previous estimate. Nash said the source of the July 17 spill that shut down a 12-mile stretch of the river and part of the Intracoastal Waterway remains unknown.
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BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | November 6, 1996
GTS Duratek Inc., the Columbia-based technology company involved in environmental cleanup, reported yesterday a 10 percent decline in third-quarter earnings despite a 22 percent surge in sales.The company reported net income of $426,000 from revenues of $11.5 million in the quarter ended Sept. 30. That compared with a profit of $473,000 and revenues of $9.4 million in the same period last year.On a per share basis, net income was equal to zero, compared with 1 cent in the third quarter of 1995.
BUSINESS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | May 13, 1997
GTS Duratek's first-quarter revenue climbed by almost 16 percent, compared with the same period last year, but its earnings were down sharply because of the cost of temporarily shutting down a plant in South Carolina, the company said yesterday.The Columbia-based disposer of radioactive waste posted total sales of $11.951 million for the first quarter, up from $10.336 million last year.It suffered a net loss of $4.7 million, or 41 cents a share, because of the decision to set aside $5.9 million to cover repairs to a processing plant at the Savannah River nuclear waste disposal site in South Carolina.
NEWS
By TOM HORTON | February 23, 1992
Augusta, Ga. -- A sobering way to view the hoped-for "peace dividend" from the winding down of the Cold War is to follow Atomic Road 19 miles south from here to the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site, where plutonium and tritium, the feedstocks for the mightiest nuclear arsenal ever assembled, have been produced for nearly half a century.In one area of the vast reservation on the South Carolina side of the Savannah River sit rows of partially-buried steel tanks, 51 in all, placed there as "temporary" storage for the residues from decades of bomb-making.
BUSINESS
November 16, 1993
Stock to fund GM pension liabilityGeneral Motors Corp. said yesterday that it would use $5.7 billion worth of stock in its Electronic Data Systems Corp. subsidiary to reduce GM's $24 billion unfunded pension liability.GM said it would transfer 185 million shares of EDS stock, which closed yesterday at $31 a share.Unions renew Lorenzo fightTrade unions yesterday reopened their fight against Frank Lorenzo's bid to start up a new airline, saying his record as owner of Continental and Eastern airlines shows him to be unfit.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | December 10, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Blurring the line between the atom's peaceful and military functions, the Energy Department embraced yesterday a plan to convert weapons-grade plutonium into fuel for civilian nuclear reactors.Energy Secretary Hazel R. O'Leary outlined the controversial multibillion-dollar plan as the best way for addressing a nuclear dilemma 50 years in the making -- how to dispose of plutonium, the lethal building block of modern nuclear weapons that is in surplus as stockpiles decline.Under the plan, which was endorsed by President Clinton, more than 50 tons of surplus plutonium stored in six sites around the nation would be consolidated at three federal facilities: along the Savannah River in South Carolina, in Oak Ridge, Tenn.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Sun Staff Writer | July 7, 1994
General Physics Corp., a Columbia-based company that specializes in training workers at nuclear power plants, is seeking approval to purchase GPS Technologies Inc., a defense and utilities industry contractor also based in Columbia.The purchase offer, which includes $10 million in cash, stock and stock purchase options, is valued at $30 million to $40 million, depending on stock price fluctuations, company executives said.The sale must be approved by stockholders of the two publicly held companies.
BUSINESS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | May 13, 1997
GTS Duratek's first-quarter revenue climbed by almost 16 percent, compared with the same period last year, but its earnings were down sharply because of the cost of temporarily shutting down a plant in South Carolina, the company said yesterday.The Columbia-based disposer of radioactive waste posted total sales of $11.951 million for the first quarter, up from $10.336 million last year.It suffered a net loss of $4.7 million, or 41 cents a share, because of the decision to set aside $5.9 million to cover repairs to a processing plant at the Savannah River nuclear waste disposal site in South Carolina.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 13, 1992
BEAUFORT, S.C. -- The scare is over, but in the "Prince of Tides" setting of golden coastal marshes, moss-draped live oaks and seaside resort communities, questions linger after a leak of radioactive water from the Savannah River Site has raised new questions about the safety of the nuclear weapons plant.At recent public hearings in Beaufort and on nearby Hilton Head Island, angry residents demanded a halt to plans to restart the aging reactor that caused the leak 150 miles from the coast.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | December 10, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Blurring the line between the atom's peaceful and military functions, the Energy Department embraced yesterday a plan to convert weapons-grade plutonium into fuel for civilian nuclear reactors.Energy Secretary Hazel R. O'Leary outlined the controversial multibillion-dollar plan as the best way for addressing a nuclear dilemma 50 years in the making -- how to dispose of plutonium, the lethal building block of modern nuclear weapons that is in surplus as stockpiles decline.Under the plan, which was endorsed by President Clinton, more than 50 tons of surplus plutonium stored in six sites around the nation would be consolidated at three federal facilities: along the Savannah River in South Carolina, in Oak Ridge, Tenn.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | November 6, 1996
GTS Duratek Inc., the Columbia-based technology company involved in environmental cleanup, reported yesterday a 10 percent decline in third-quarter earnings despite a 22 percent surge in sales.The company reported net income of $426,000 from revenues of $11.5 million in the quarter ended Sept. 30. That compared with a profit of $473,000 and revenues of $9.4 million in the same period last year.On a per share basis, net income was equal to zero, compared with 1 cent in the third quarter of 1995.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Sun Staff Writer | July 7, 1994
General Physics Corp., a Columbia-based company that specializes in training workers at nuclear power plants, is seeking approval to purchase GPS Technologies Inc., a defense and utilities industry contractor also based in Columbia.The purchase offer, which includes $10 million in cash, stock and stock purchase options, is valued at $30 million to $40 million, depending on stock price fluctuations, company executives said.The sale must be approved by stockholders of the two publicly held companies.
BUSINESS
November 16, 1993
Stock to fund GM pension liabilityGeneral Motors Corp. said yesterday that it would use $5.7 billion worth of stock in its Electronic Data Systems Corp. subsidiary to reduce GM's $24 billion unfunded pension liability.GM said it would transfer 185 million shares of EDS stock, which closed yesterday at $31 a share.Unions renew Lorenzo fightTrade unions yesterday reopened their fight against Frank Lorenzo's bid to start up a new airline, saying his record as owner of Continental and Eastern airlines shows him to be unfit.
NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Staff Writer | October 28, 1992
LaFAYETTE, La. -- Though still concerned about Ross Perot, Bill Clinton campaigned yesterday like a confident front-runner, staging rallies in three Southern states President Bush won easily in 1988.The crowds responded enthusiastically at all of Mr. Clinton's stops. Sensing victory, they often interrupted to chant, "One more week," a reference to the short time Mr. Bush and Mr. Perot have to overtake Mr. Clinton on Election Day.New polls showed Mr. Perot's post-debate popularity surge subsiding and support for Mr. Clinton stabilizing.
NEWS
By TOM HORTON | February 23, 1992
Augusta, Ga. -- A sobering way to view the hoped-for "peace dividend" from the winding down of the Cold War is to follow Atomic Road 19 miles south from here to the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site, where plutonium and tritium, the feedstocks for the mightiest nuclear arsenal ever assembled, have been produced for nearly half a century.In one area of the vast reservation on the South Carolina side of the Savannah River sit rows of partially-buried steel tanks, 51 in all, placed there as "temporary" storage for the residues from decades of bomb-making.
NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Staff Writer | October 28, 1992
LaFAYETTE, La. -- Though still concerned about Ross Perot, Bill Clinton campaigned yesterday like a confident front-runner, staging rallies in three Southern states President Bush won easily in 1988.The crowds responded enthusiastically at all of Mr. Clinton's stops. Sensing victory, they often interrupted to chant, "One more week," a reference to the short time Mr. Bush and Mr. Perot have to overtake Mr. Clinton on Election Day.New polls showed Mr. Perot's post-debate popularity surge subsiding and support for Mr. Clinton stabilizing.
NEWS
August 5, 2003
Michael Joseph Burns, a Westinghouse nuclear worker, died of a heart attack Wednesday at a hospital in Aiken, S.C. He was 47 and formerly lived in Catonsville. Born in Baltimore and raised in Catonsville, he was a 1974 graduate of Mount St. Joseph High School and played on its basketball team. He attended the former Catonsville Community College. He became a radar specialist for Westinghouse Electric Corp. at its Linthicum plant and moved to Aiken 10 years ago to work at the Westinghouse Savannah River Site, which produces components of nuclear weapons.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 13, 1992
BEAUFORT, S.C. -- The scare is over, but in the "Prince of Tides" setting of golden coastal marshes, moss-draped live oaks and seaside resort communities, questions linger after a leak of radioactive water from the Savannah River Site has raised new questions about the safety of the nuclear weapons plant.At recent public hearings in Beaufort and on nearby Hilton Head Island, angry residents demanded a halt to plans to restart the aging reactor that caused the leak 150 miles from the coast.
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