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FEATURES
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,BRUCE REID is a metropolitan reporter for The Sun | May 17, 1992
Up near the headwaters of the Savage River, deep in a gorge so steep that some trees could never be reached and cut by loggers, you can travel back in time.The destination: one of the last pockets of remote, untouched woodlands in Maryland. About 1,000 acres of "old growth" forest still exist in the state. Most of what's left is here, in the Savage River drainage basin in Garrett County.You can't get there by car. On this day, reaching one particular old-growth stand required a two-hour walk from the nearest dirt road.
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SPORTS
By Bill Free and Bill Free,Staff Writer | May 17, 1992
BLOOMINGTON -- Jon Lugbill gave whitewater slalom racing fans what they wanted to see yesterday in the U.S. Canoe and Kayak Olympic team trials.Lugbill, of Bethesda, charged down the Savage River to a wide margin of victory over longtime challenger David Hearn of Bethesda in the men's single canoe qualifying competition.Lugbill, a five-time world champion, goes to Barcelona as the top member of the U.S. team, and Hearn has the second spot.Lugbill, 30, turned in a top run with a score of 131.33 points on the Savage, where he has not lost a race since 1986.
NEWS
May 15, 1992
For sports lovers looking for non-Preakness entertainment tomorrow, the place to be is the Savage River in Western Maryland's Garrett County. That's where the Olympic trials for whitewater slalom racing take place, 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., tomorrow and again on Sunday.It isn't often that Marylanders get a chance to host an Olympic trial of this nature, and certainly not one as breathtaking as this one. Competitors, male and female, navigate a 350-meter course with 25 gates along the raging river.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Staff Writer | May 15, 1992
Want to know what a five-ringed seal of Olympic approval can do for a sport and its competitors?Meet Dave Curran.A year ago, he had a car, a condo and a career in sales. Now, he is a self-described whitewater "kayak bum." He drives from river to river in a pickup truck. He shares rug space with furniture and pets in homes of friends. He dips into a dwindling savings account to pay for meals.L At 34, he is living out a fantasy, courtesy of the Olympics."Before, this was just a nut and berry sport," said Curran, a native of Doylestown, Pa. "Now, it has some clout because of the Olympics.
SPORTS
May 10, 1992
FISHINGMonday: Monthly meeting of Pasadena Sportfishing at the Waterbury Inn on Magothy Beach Road in Pasadena, 7:30 p.m. Speaker is scheduled to be Capt. Russ Morrow from Wachapreague, Va., who will speak about flounder fishing. Call (410) 255-3678.May 22-25: Maryland Charter Boat Association Memorial Day Weekend fishing tournament. Cash prizes, including $2,000 for largest bluefish and $1,000 for largest sea trout. Entry fee is $25 ,, per boat per day. Call (301) 261-5656.May 27: Monthly meeting of the Maryland Fly Anglers at the Ridge Gardens Apartments clubhouse, Old Harford Road and Putty Hill Avenue, 7:30 p.m. The speaker will be Wally Vait, who will deal with fishing the Gunpowder River.
SPORTS
April 23, 1992
It's being billed as The Paddle Battle on the Savage River in Western Maryland.There will be clowns, mimes, bands and concessions. The more adventurous can even paddle a canoe or take a white-water raft ride down a river.But the main event, May 16-17, will be the 1992 U.S. Olympic team trials for white-water slalom racing.State officials presented their final plans for the Olympic trials yesterday. Tickets for each session will be $10, free for children under 12 accompanied by an adult. Tickets for the trials, which will be held near Bloomington, are available at all area TicketMaster outlets.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Sun Staff Correspondent | December 20, 1991
DICKERSON -- Jon Lugbill climbed out of the steaming, 60-degree water into the frigid morning air and looked as if he would shout for joy."This is absolutely wonderful," said the five-time Whitewater World Champion after demonstrating the new man-made whitewater course at the Potomac Electric Power Company's Dickerson power plant in Montgomery County. "It came out of nowhere and it's good enough right now to have the world championships right here."The U.S. whitewater team can now stay home.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker | December 15, 1991
Rain over the past two weeks seems to have washed away a potential problem with the trout population in the Lower Savage River, Robert Bachman said Thursday.The drought in Garrett County had created problems with the water levels in the Savage River Reservoir and, you may recall, some fishermen in Western Maryland had worried that reduced flows in the lower river would endanger its trout.Bachman said that water levels in the reservoir are still lower than normal, but that water lost to controversial white-water trials in the river had been replaced by the rains.
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