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Savage River

NEWS
By Heather Dewar and By Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | December 23, 2001
Deep in Savage River State Forest - a long scramble and slither from the nearest road - stands a forest so old that its giants were already standing tall at the start of the Civil War. Here, on a steep slope overlooking the ravine cut by the Savage River, black bears' trails ramble between towering red oaks, white oaks, maple and beech that ecologists say are at least 200 years old. Velvety red fungi explode from the trunk of a long-dead fire cherry tree,...
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NEWS
By HOWARD LIBIT and HOWARD LIBIT,SUN STAFF | February 6, 2000
BLOOMINGTON -- This town knows death -- usually by trucks. Proof is found in 18 faded white crosses at the foot of Cemetery Hill, each marking the fatal crash of a truck whose brakes failed. But today, this tight-knit community on the border of Garrett and Allegany counties and West Virginia is burying Eddie Lee Rogers, a 15-year-old who died in an unexpected way last Sunday, when an out-of-control coal train smashed through his house just yards away from the tracks. "No one ever dreamed that the train would run off the track," says Alice Howard, Bloomington's historian and one of its oldest residents.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | January 5, 2000
PUZZLEY RUN -- Deep in a state forest near this Garrett County stream, a fluorescent pink ribbon marks the spot where local officials hope to find the water to supply a growing community and spur economic development in one of the poorest regions of Maryland. But the ribbon is attached to a metal stake driven into the ground under a hemlock tree in a Sensitive Management Area in Savage River State Forest, where a state management plan prohibits "resource extraction." Changes in that plan require public comment, yet the state Department of Natural Resources has granted the nearby town of Grantsville permission to drill a test well on the site without asking for public opinion.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | October 29, 1998
The Savage River is a wild, magical place where cool mists often form over the rocky watercourse as it tumbles down through the forests of Garrett County to merge with the Potomac -- and some of the best trout fishing in the state can be had in its deep pools and pockets.In recent weeks the Department of Natural Resources has documented record wild trout biomass and densities in the trophy area downstream from the Savage Reservoir dam.A survey, conducted annually by the state's Fisheries Service, estimated that the combined standing crop and density of adult wild brown and native brook trout are 83.8 pounds per acre and 1,664 trout per mile.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | April 12, 1998
Freshwater trout and white perch continue to provide the best fishing action for bank fishermen, and croaker continue to surprise tidewater anglers on the lower Eastern Shore.According to the Department of Natural Resources, medium to large croaker are being taken on hook and line from northern Tangier Sound to Upper Hooper's Island.The early arrival of croaker seems to coincide with the early movements of many tidewater species which have been influenced by the early warming trend this spring.
NEWS
By Matthew French and Matthew French,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | June 26, 1997
Yesterday afternoon -- as temperatures soared to nearly 100 -- about 35 youths and adults were swimming along the Savage rapids section of the Little Patuxent River below Historic Savage Mill, as generations of area residents have before them.The generally quiet group was made up of youths who recently finished school for the year, families with small children and men in their late 20s or early 30s -- tanning on the rocks and sliding down the mild rapids."It's just a cool place to come and hang out," says Mark Thomas, of Laurel.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | December 20, 1994
GRANTSVILLE -- State officials are weighing two business ventures that would create badly needed jobs in Garrett County but also would require unusual private use of publicly owned forest.In one venture, James Oberhaus, a Frostburg businessman and his partner, Patriot Mining Co. of Morgantown, W.Va., are seeking state approval for coal-mining deep underneath 498 acres in Potomac-Garrett State Forest in southern Garrett County.Mr. Oberhaus proposes leasing the tract from the state. In exchange, he would give Maryland a highly sought 216-acre tract next to Savage River State Forest in the northeastern part of the county, as well as mineral rights to another 2,800 acres in the forest and royalties from coal mined at the leased site.
NEWS
October 20, 1994
The state Board of Public Works approved yesterday spending nearly $5.4 million to buy more than 4,000 acres of marsh, shoreline and river-front land as the first step in a drive to protect natural lands.Of the six properties being acquired, five are on the Eastern Shore and have a blend of waterfowl and rare plants.Three, totaling 2,400 acres, border Fishing Bay in Dorchester County; a 335-acre property is on the Nanticoke River in Caroline County; and the fifth is a 990-acre farm in Kent County.
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | September 17, 1992
NAMES AND PLACES* The Fall Maryland RV Show, said to be the largest recreational vehicle expo on the East Coast, continues through Sunday at the Timonium Fairgrounds. More than 85 brand names will be on display. Discount tickets are available from Maryland RV dealers. The show opens at noon daily. For more information, call (410) 687-7200.* Starting Oct. 1, fees will be charged for camping at Savage River and Potomac-Garrett state forests in Garrett County. There will be a $2 charge for regular campsites and $5 for group sites.
SPORTS
By Bill Free and Bill Free,Staff Writer | May 18, 1992
BLOOMINGTON -- Kara Ruppel traveled the ultimate in highs and lows for an athlete yesterday.Ruppel, a University of Maryland senior, apparently had made the U.S. Olympic team one minute, then found out five minutes later she was off the team when officials discovered that Seattle's Maylon Hanold actually had earned the third and final spot on the women's single kayak team.Hanold, in a change of scheduling from Saturday, had the last run of the day and turned in a 161.68 score to take the third spot from Ruppel (165.
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