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NEWS
November 16, 1990
Next year, Western Maryland will pass up the popular white-water canoe and kayak races which have helped boost the region's depressed economy. The decision, forced by a lack of state and private funds, may prove to be a blessing in disguise. The mighty Savage River, site of previous national and international events, is being boosted instead for trial competition for those who seek places on the 1992 U.S. Olympic white-water racing team.That is a creative response to the loss next year of canoe and kayak events.
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SPORTS
By From Sun staff reports | May 26, 2011
The 2014 Canoe Slalom World Championships will be held Sept. 16-21 in Western Maryland. The International Canoe Federation has awarded the event to Adventure Sports Center International over competing entries from Vienna, Austria and Krakow, Poland. ASCI, located in Deep Creek Lake in Garrett County, is home to the world's only mountaintop man-made whitewater course and has taken more than 44,000 people paddling since it opened in 2007. The championships will return to the United States for the first time since 1989, when they were held on the Savage River, also in Garrett County.
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SPORTS
April 23, 1992
It's being billed as The Paddle Battle on the Savage River in Western Maryland.There will be clowns, mimes, bands and concessions. The more adventurous can even paddle a canoe or take a white-water raft ride down a river.But the main event, May 16-17, will be the 1992 U.S. Olympic team trials for white-water slalom racing.State officials presented their final plans for the Olympic trials yesterday. Tickets for each session will be $10, free for children under 12 accompanied by an adult. Tickets for the trials, which will be held near Bloomington, are available at all area TicketMaster outlets.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | December 17, 2009
Another premier Maryland trout stream has become tainted by an invasive algae feared worldwide for its ability to coat the bottom of rivers and lakes and smother the habitat and food supply of fish. Biologists at the Department of Natural Resources announced Wednesday that didymo, known by anglers as "rock snot," was found in Garrett County's Savage River late last month. "There's nothing we can do short of closing the area down, and that's draconian," said Don Cosden, inland fisheries director.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker | December 15, 1991
Rain over the past two weeks seems to have washed away a potential problem with the trout population in the Lower Savage River, Robert Bachman said Thursday.The drought in Garrett County had created problems with the water levels in the Savage River Reservoir and, you may recall, some fishermen in Western Maryland had worried that reduced flows in the lower river would endanger its trout.Bachman said that water levels in the reservoir are still lower than normal, but that water lost to controversial white-water trials in the river had been replaced by the rains.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | October 29, 1998
The Savage River is a wild, magical place where cool mists often form over the rocky watercourse as it tumbles down through the forests of Garrett County to merge with the Potomac -- and some of the best trout fishing in the state can be had in its deep pools and pockets.In recent weeks the Department of Natural Resources has documented record wild trout biomass and densities in the trophy area downstream from the Savage Reservoir dam.A survey, conducted annually by the state's Fisheries Service, estimated that the combined standing crop and density of adult wild brown and native brook trout are 83.8 pounds per acre and 1,664 trout per mile.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Evening Sun Staff | November 25, 1991
Maryland natural resource officials, besieged by environmentalists upset by timber-cutting in state forests, have proposed limits on logging in Maryland's largest and ecologically richest forest.A draft 10-year plan for managing Savage River State Forest in Garrett County would effectively prohibit commercial timber cutting on 45 percent of the 53,384-acre forest. Chain saws could not be allowed to touch wooded areas that border roads and streams, cling to steep slopes or harbor rare plants and animals.
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | December 9, 1990
Saltwater fishing seems to have gotten all the attention this year, what with striped bass fishing briefly reopened, bluefishing slowed and destined for limitation next year, and virtually every sport species under new management schemes or being studied for management plans.Striped bass, of course, captured most of the attention as preparations were made for the first season in more than five years -- and undoubtedly will receive more as the 1991 seasons are hammered out.But while fisheries managers, sportsfishermen, charter-boat operators and commercial fishermen haggle over who gets which shares of the fishery, there are a couple of success stories to report from above the tide line.
SPORTS
By Bill Free and Bill Free,Staff Writer | May 17, 1992
BLOOMINGTON -- Jon Lugbill gave whitewater slalom racing fans what they wanted to see yesterday in the U.S. Canoe and Kayak Olympic team trials.Lugbill, of Bethesda, charged down the Savage River to a wide margin of victory over longtime challenger David Hearn of Bethesda in the men's single canoe qualifying competition.Lugbill, a five-time world champion, goes to Barcelona as the top member of the U.S. team, and Hearn has the second spot.Lugbill, 30, turned in a top run with a score of 131.33 points on the Savage, where he has not lost a race since 1986.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Staff Writer | May 15, 1992
Want to know what a five-ringed seal of Olympic approval can do for a sport and its competitors?Meet Dave Curran.A year ago, he had a car, a condo and a career in sales. Now, he is a self-described whitewater "kayak bum." He drives from river to river in a pickup truck. He shares rug space with furniture and pets in homes of friends. He dips into a dwindling savings account to pay for meals.L At 34, he is living out a fantasy, courtesy of the Olympics."Before, this was just a nut and berry sport," said Curran, a native of Doylestown, Pa. "Now, it has some clout because of the Olympics.
NEWS
By Mike Tidwell | December 26, 2007
With ominous global warming accelerating year after year, why can't Maryland construct a single clean-energy wind farm within its borders? Gov. Martin O'Malley's blue-ribbon commission says we must get off fossil fuel very soon. But our state - one of the most vulnerable in America to global warming and one of the most politically liberal - can't achieve even the baby step of a single commercial wind farm. What's the problem? West Virginia has dozens of wind turbines; Pennsylvania even more.
NEWS
December 12, 2007
The Maryland Department of Natural Resources will hold public hearings next month on whether the state should allow developers to build wind turbines in state forests, a proposal being advanced by a Pennsylvania company. U.S. Wind Force is asking the state for leases in Potomac State Forest and Savage River State Forest in Western Maryland so it can clear about 400 mountaintop acres and raise about 100 wind turbines. The machines would be about 40 stories tall and would be visible from some of the region's most popular recreation areas, including Deep Creek Lake and the Savage River Reservoir.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN REPORTER | December 6, 2007
A Pennsylvania company is asking the O'Malley administration for leases in two Western Maryland state forests so it can clear up to 400 mountaintop acres to build about 100 wind turbines. The U.S. Wind Force structures would be about 40 stories tall and visible from some of the region's most popular tourist areas, including Deep Creek Lake and the Savage River Reservoir.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | December 3, 2006
Can't anyone at the top of the Department of Natural Resources take responsibility for closing off public land in Savage River State Forest? With all the skulking and mysteriously appearing pronouncements on the agency Web site, what at first seemed to be a minor matter has blossomed into a full-scale exhibit of state government at its worst. Hunters all over the state are in an uproar and want answers. State lawmakers such as Garrett County's Senator-elect George Edwards want an explanation.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | November 26, 2006
Throw the bums out. If not now, in January. Bring in the Prince of Darkness, Joe Steffen, to clean house at the Department of Natural Resources. If he's busy, pick another hatchet man and give him a fistful of pink slips. Any DNR official involved in creating the conflict between hunters and an upscale private resort at Savage River State Forest in Western Maryland should be on notice. Taxpaying citizens should never have to beg their government to ensure access to public land. The story is this: The owner of the Savage River Lodge in eastern Garrett County pulled strings and got DNR to post bright yellow signs prohibiting hunting in the portion of Savage River State Forest that abuts his property and the access road leading to it. Mike Dreisbach, who opened the lodge about six years ago, says some of his guests have become frightened when they encounter hunters while hiking or cross-country skiing.
TRAVEL
By MICHELLE DEAL-ZIMMERMAN and MICHELLE DEAL-ZIMMERMAN,TRAVEL EDITOR | February 5, 2006
Everyone knows Virginia is for lovers. And Hershey, Pa., claims to be the "sweetest place on Earth." We don't doubt that, having gotten a whiff of the heavenly chocolate air. Then there's the town of Valentine in New Jersey - now that's a state that doesn't get a lot of love. But what about Maryland? Do we have any claim to romance? While the state may be known for its hard-shell crabs, Maryland has a softer side. You just have to know where to look. With Valentine's Day rapidly approaching, we asked readers to tell us the most romantic places in Maryland.
NEWS
May 15, 1992
For sports lovers looking for non-Preakness entertainment tomorrow, the place to be is the Savage River in Western Maryland's Garrett County. That's where the Olympic trials for whitewater slalom racing take place, 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., tomorrow and again on Sunday.It isn't often that Marylanders get a chance to host an Olympic trial of this nature, and certainly not one as breathtaking as this one. Competitors, male and female, navigate a 350-meter course with 25 gates along the raging river.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker | October 28, 1990
The Maryland Department of Natural Resources is proposing changes in non-tidal fishing regulations for 1991 that would provide additional put-and-take trout fishing areas and further protect the state's wild brook and brown trout populations.The proposals would create 10 additional trout stocking areas in a total of eight counties, including three among Howard, Prince George's and Montgomery counties and a catch-and-release area restricted to the use of artificial lures at Gunpowder Falls.
TRAVEL
By Bob Downing and Bob Downing,Knight Ridder / Tribune | March 23, 2003
Marylanders who don't live in the western part of the state might sometimes forget about that region's mountains -- those genuinely rugged, thigh-busting mountains. One place in Western Mary-land where you can find trails to take you into the heart of those mountains is the relatively little-known Savage River State Forest. The state forest is a playground for hikers, backpackers, paddlers, anglers, hunters, mountain bikers, snowmobilers, cross-country skiers, off-road drivers and even ice climbers.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | April 11, 2002
The Maryland General Assembly has protected one of the oldest and most pristine oak forests left in the Appalachian region, and has encouraged scientists to prospect for botanical medicines in the steep, secluded woods, under a deal struck by conservationists and Garrett County legislators. Two 2,000-acre stands of oaks, hemlocks, maple and beech in Savage River State Forest have been designated as "wildlands," forever off-limits to most kinds of human alteration, including logging and trail-building.
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