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Saul Bellow

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By Stephen Margulies | April 14, 1991
SAUL BELLOW: A BIOGRAPHY OF THE IMAGINATION.Ruth Miller.St. Martin's.385 pages. $24.95.Is Nobel Prize-winning novelist Saul Bellow a great man, a luminary who can illuminate us? Or is he a slapstick comedian, a victim of his own shticks? Is he a genius or a jerk?Few American writers possess Saul Bellow's elegantly humane dignity, his personal grace. Few can match his world-recognized accomplishments, which seem to be a fulfillment of the fantasies of characters in his early novels -- or duplications in real life of the success of fictional creations like Henderson or Benn Crader.
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NEWS
By Michael Ollove and Mary McCauley and Michael Ollove and Mary McCauley,SUN STAFF | April 6, 2005
Nobel laureate Saul Bellow, the towering American literary figure whose work reflected the angst, yearnings and moral ambiguity of post-World War II existence, died yesterday at 89. Mr. Bellow's friend and attorney, Walter Pozen, said that the writer of such vibrant, darkly comic works as Herzog and Humboldt's Gift, had been in declining health but was "wonderfully sharp to the end." Mr. Bellow died in Brookline, Mass., his wife and daughter at his side. Mr. Bellow was perhaps the most acclaimed of a remarkable collection of postwar American Jewish writers that included Bernard Malamud, Joseph Heller, Philip Roth and Cynthia Ozick.
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FEATURES
May 17, 1998
Saul Bellow(1915-)Writers born in the intellectual air sign of Gemini, ruled by the volatile planet of Mercury, can be typed as "dual" in their thinking processes, as the Latin word for "twins" indicates. Mentally agile, curious, and multiform, the creations of Geminis are marked by their variety and by the tendency to polarize human characteristics for dramatic effect.- The Literary AlmanacSaul Bellow is author of the best-selling novel "Herzog," and has authored numerous other books including "The Adventures of Augie March" and "Mr. Sammler's Planet."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | April 9, 2000
Saul Bellow, a towering figure of American literature, has, at 84, produced a new novel. It is vibrant with life, joy, love -- and abrim with wisdom. If proof were needed that great craft need not ebb with age, and that a brilliant mind and courageous heart need never cease growing, here it is: "Ravelstein" (Penguin Putnam Inc., 233 pages, $24.95). The book is concise and the story quite simple. It centers on Abe Ravelstein, a distinguished, controversial scholar of political philosophy.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | January 31, 2000
Whatever you think of Bill, if it weren't for the 22nd Amendment, he would just get re-elected all over again. When Coca-Cola puts its headquarters on Diet, the fizz goes out of Atlanta. Saul Bellow, at 84, has a new job, wife, baby and novel, in case you were wondering why the Social Security Administration is escalating the age of retirement. Say it ain't so, Helmut.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | July 20, 1997
"Handsome Is: Adventures with Saul Bellow," by Harriet Wasserman. Fromm Iternational. $23.95. 194 pages.Ignorance may not be bliss, but it has its advantages. Despite my weakness for literary gossip, I had somehow managed to miss the end, just last year, of the 25-year professional relationship between Saul Bellow and his agent, Harriet Wasserman. So I read bemusedly and unbiasedly through "Handsome Is," wondering why anyone would choose to turn what is essentially a longish Vanity Fair piece into a shortish book.
NEWS
By Rebecca Pepper Sinkler and Rebecca Pepper Sinkler,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 1, 1997
"The Actual," by Saul Bellow. Viking. 102 pages. $17.95.Forty-five years ago, a young novelist wrote of contemporary American fiction, "One is accustomed to expect excellent novels about boys, but a modern novel about men is exceedingly rare." [Review published in Commentary, June 1952.] The novelist was Saul Bellow, and he was hailing the publication of Ralph Ellison's "Invisible Man," proof that "a truly heroic quality can exist among our contemporaries."Today, thanks partly to Bellow and those very contemporaries, we are accustomed to excellent novels about grown -- but not elderly -- men and women.
NEWS
October 10, 1993
The first American author taken seriously abroad on literary merit was an African young woman who had been brought to Boston a few years earlier and had mastered English as a second language while a slave. Phillis Wheatley's "Poems on Various Subjects" was the literary sensation of London in 1773. Its success proved not only that someone female from Africa could excel within the rigid forms then fashionable in English poetry but that someone educated in America could.Race and gender and emotion hardly showed in Phillis Wheatley's disciplined verse.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | April 9, 2000
Saul Bellow, a towering figure of American literature, has, at 84, produced a new novel. It is vibrant with life, joy, love -- and abrim with wisdom. If proof were needed that great craft need not ebb with age, and that a brilliant mind and courageous heart need never cease growing, here it is: "Ravelstein" (Penguin Putnam Inc., 233 pages, $24.95). The book is concise and the story quite simple. It centers on Abe Ravelstein, a distinguished, controversial scholar of political philosophy.
NEWS
By Michael Ollove and Mary McCauley and Michael Ollove and Mary McCauley,SUN STAFF | April 6, 2005
Nobel laureate Saul Bellow, the towering American literary figure whose work reflected the angst, yearnings and moral ambiguity of post-World War II existence, died yesterday at 89. Mr. Bellow's friend and attorney, Walter Pozen, said that the writer of such vibrant, darkly comic works as Herzog and Humboldt's Gift, had been in declining health but was "wonderfully sharp to the end." Mr. Bellow died in Brookline, Mass., his wife and daughter at his side. Mr. Bellow was perhaps the most acclaimed of a remarkable collection of postwar American Jewish writers that included Bernard Malamud, Joseph Heller, Philip Roth and Cynthia Ozick.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | January 31, 2000
Whatever you think of Bill, if it weren't for the 22nd Amendment, he would just get re-elected all over again. When Coca-Cola puts its headquarters on Diet, the fizz goes out of Atlanta. Saul Bellow, at 84, has a new job, wife, baby and novel, in case you were wondering why the Social Security Administration is escalating the age of retirement. Say it ain't so, Helmut.
FEATURES
May 17, 1998
Saul Bellow(1915-)Writers born in the intellectual air sign of Gemini, ruled by the volatile planet of Mercury, can be typed as "dual" in their thinking processes, as the Latin word for "twins" indicates. Mentally agile, curious, and multiform, the creations of Geminis are marked by their variety and by the tendency to polarize human characteristics for dramatic effect.- The Literary AlmanacSaul Bellow is author of the best-selling novel "Herzog," and has authored numerous other books including "The Adventures of Augie March" and "Mr. Sammler's Planet."
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | July 20, 1997
"Handsome Is: Adventures with Saul Bellow," by Harriet Wasserman. Fromm Iternational. $23.95. 194 pages.Ignorance may not be bliss, but it has its advantages. Despite my weakness for literary gossip, I had somehow managed to miss the end, just last year, of the 25-year professional relationship between Saul Bellow and his agent, Harriet Wasserman. So I read bemusedly and unbiasedly through "Handsome Is," wondering why anyone would choose to turn what is essentially a longish Vanity Fair piece into a shortish book.
NEWS
By Rebecca Pepper Sinkler and Rebecca Pepper Sinkler,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 1, 1997
"The Actual," by Saul Bellow. Viking. 102 pages. $17.95.Forty-five years ago, a young novelist wrote of contemporary American fiction, "One is accustomed to expect excellent novels about boys, but a modern novel about men is exceedingly rare." [Review published in Commentary, June 1952.] The novelist was Saul Bellow, and he was hailing the publication of Ralph Ellison's "Invisible Man," proof that "a truly heroic quality can exist among our contemporaries."Today, thanks partly to Bellow and those very contemporaries, we are accustomed to excellent novels about grown -- but not elderly -- men and women.
NEWS
October 10, 1993
The first American author taken seriously abroad on literary merit was an African young woman who had been brought to Boston a few years earlier and had mastered English as a second language while a slave. Phillis Wheatley's "Poems on Various Subjects" was the literary sensation of London in 1773. Its success proved not only that someone female from Africa could excel within the rigid forms then fashionable in English poetry but that someone educated in America could.Race and gender and emotion hardly showed in Phillis Wheatley's disciplined verse.
NEWS
By Stephen Margulies | April 14, 1991
SAUL BELLOW: A BIOGRAPHY OF THE IMAGINATION.Ruth Miller.St. Martin's.385 pages. $24.95.Is Nobel Prize-winning novelist Saul Bellow a great man, a luminary who can illuminate us? Or is he a slapstick comedian, a victim of his own shticks? Is he a genius or a jerk?Few American writers possess Saul Bellow's elegantly humane dignity, his personal grace. Few can match his world-recognized accomplishments, which seem to be a fulfillment of the fantasies of characters in his early novels -- or duplications in real life of the success of fictional creations like Henderson or Benn Crader.
NEWS
September 1, 1999
Joan R. Braden,77, a hostess to and confidante of Washington's political heavyweights and senior government officials for more than three decades, died of a heart attack Monday in Washington.Mrs. Braden performed those roles as she raised eight children, a story her husband, columnist Tom Braden, chronicled in the book "Eight is Enough," which became an ABC television series from 1977 to 1981.Evelyn Shrifte,98, a longtime president of Vanguard Press, which published the first books of Saul Bellow and Dr. Seuss, died Aug. 8 in New York.
NEWS
March 22, 2001
An interview with Lorri Roth, 28-year member of Columbia Book Club. How long has your club been around? Well, Columbia began in '67. ... I would say soon after that - perhaps, by 1970. Having been around so long, what do you think of the latest boom in book clubs? Oh, I think it's wonderful. I think it's indicative of the intelligence of the community and also the desire to meet with other people and get their opinions. Stimulating, I think. What book are members reading this month? "The Poisonwood Bible" by Barbara Kingsolver.
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