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By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2014
Fran Klees from Dowagiac, Mich., was looking for a recipe for Polish sauerkraut and sausage that contains vinegar and sugar as well as other traditional seasonings and is made in a slow cooker. I was a little surprised that I didn't receive any responses from readers to Klees' request, but with a little research I had no trouble finding several recipes that fit the bill. I decided to test a recipe from a food blog called Foodie Smash, written by Ashlee Warzin from El Paso, Texas.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2014
Fran Klees from Dowagiac, Mich., was looking for a recipe for Polish sauerkraut and sausage that contains vinegar and sugar as well as other traditional seasonings and is made in a slow cooker. I was a little surprised that I didn't receive any responses from readers to Klees' request, but with a little research I had no trouble finding several recipes that fit the bill. I decided to test a recipe from a food blog called Foodie Smash, written by Ashlee Warzin from El Paso, Texas.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2013
The workmen who built the Great Wall of China ate it for strength. Sailors on early American clipper ships consumed it for health during long voyages. It has tickled Teutonic taste buds and made its way across France, England and the New World. It has never lost its in-your-face pungency, its low-calorie, high-vitamin profile - or, in modern times, its capacity to tease just the right flavors from a hot dog or Reuben sandwich. It's sauerkraut, that tartly tantalizing fermented-cabbage dish that long ago took its oddball place alongside gravy and sweet potatoes as a staple of Baltimore Thanksgiving dinners.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2013
The workmen who built the Great Wall of China ate it for strength. Sailors on early American clipper ships consumed it for health during long voyages. It has tickled Teutonic taste buds and made its way across France, England and the New World. It has never lost its in-your-face pungency, its low-calorie, high-vitamin profile - or, in modern times, its capacity to tease just the right flavors from a hot dog or Reuben sandwich. It's sauerkraut, that tartly tantalizing fermented-cabbage dish that long ago took its oddball place alongside gravy and sweet potatoes as a staple of Baltimore Thanksgiving dinners.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2011
Gertrude's has announced the dates for its 9th annual Krautfest. Tickets went on sale Tuesday, Nov. 1. The dates of the 2012 Krautfest are Friday, Jan. 13 and Saturday, Jan. 14. The event features dancing to the traditional and contemporary polka music by Joy of Maryland and a buffet dinner. A cash bar will offer "Krautinis," seasonal German and Eastern European beers and specialty vodkas. The buffet menu comprises roasted beef borscht with sauerkraut, sour beef brisket, pork goulash, kraut-brasied red potatoes and carrots, peirogies and a charcuterie platter with Ostowski's kielbasa and Binkert's Bavarian bratwurst, knackwurst and weisswurst.
FEATURES
By Carleton Jones | September 4, 1991
Ireally think I could pay off the auto loan quickly if I could think of an adequate diet consisting solely of cabbages, bananas and oatmeal, then package it and sell it.In this day of occasional 50-cent tomatoes and lemons, a head of cabbage, fresh and green, does come with an increased allure.Though we think of it ordinarily as an accompaniment for such wintry specialties as corned beef platters and pork roasts, cabbage and its pungent daughter sauerkraut deserve at least another look in late summer because (1)
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | November 29, 2000
Rolie S. Webb of Hope Mills, N.C., requested a recipe that he found in the paper a few years ago. "I threw the paper away. It was a chocolate sauerkraut cake with beer in it. Recently I found your address in the Fayetteville Observer-Times and would thank you for your help in finding this recipe." Mary Herberger of Sioux Falls, S.D., responded with a recipe that came from "Recipes of Americana" by Carole Eberly. Sauerkraut-and-Beer Cake Serves 16 2/3 cup butter, softened 1 1/2 cups sugar 3 eggs 1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla 1/2 cup cocoa 2 1/4 cups flour 1 teaspoon baking powder 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 cup beer 2/3 cup (8-ounce can)
NEWS
By Susan Magsamen | November 22, 2007
I have a friend who married into a Baltimore family in 1997 and had a vague idea that their traditional Thanksgiving meal included sauerkraut. Eager to embrace all things dear to her dear one, she arranged for her mother to include it at their first Thanksgiving as newlywed guests in faraway northern Virginia. It turns out that this particular Baltimore family is fond of hot coleslaw, which is definitely not sauerkraut. Three years passed before she understood the difference. It's a story that will be told at their table this afternoon - and will mean something different to each person at the table - ranging from "Mom is so dumb!"
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun Staff | June 23, 2004
WALDOBORO, Maine -- Just one forkful and it all becomes clear why two art dealers from Seattle, who trace their meeting to a Bolivian witch doctor, gave up their business, moved to rural Maine and spent their life savings to buy an 82-year-old sauerkraut-making business. Or maybe not. But have another forkful of what may be the freshest, best-tasting kraut in the New World while Jacqueline Sawyer and David Swetnam tell you their story as they tend great white barrels of fermenting cabbage and a steady stream of customers.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | September 21, 2003
My 37-year-old daughter has battled canker sores her entire life. It's not unusual for her to have more than 10 at a time. She's tried a lot of different treatments through the years with little success. Recently she had a baby and did not have one sore the entire pregnancy. Six weeks after delivering, the sores came back in full force. Her doctor prescribed oral corticosteroid, which cleared up her mouth sores temporarily. They returned as soon as the steroids wore off. Incidentally, she is a nurse, but she has yet to find any help.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick | December 18, 2012
Gertrude's 10th annual Krautfest is coming in January. Tickets are on sale now for John Shields' two-day celebration of sauerkraut. The first Krautfest, in 2003, was a collaboration between Shields and Tomislav Niksic, who was Gertrude's chef at the time, and was inspired by homemade basement sauerkraut of Shields' grandmother, Gertrude Cleary, for whom his restaurant is named. What began as a small celebration at the restaurant's bar has evolved into a Baltimore dining tradition, a celebration with polka dancing and a full Bavarian menu of locally made sausages, stuffed cabbage, borscht, sauerbraten, spaetzle, winter vegetables and even kraut-inspired dessert.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2012
Amid all the beer and sauerkraut, all the wurst and schnitzel and strudel of every kind, 6-year-old E.J. Johnson was the clear hit of the 112th German Festival on Sunday. That's what happens when you don a brand-new Tyrolean hat and lederhosen and dance nonstop to a steady succession of polkas and oom-pah tunes. In fact, when you're that busy, there's not much time to talk, or to contemplate. Asked what he liked best about the festival, E.J. flashed a gap-toothed grin, said simply, "dancing," and continued clapping and swaying to the rhythm.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE | November 19, 2008
Obviously, anything could be an alternative to a traditional roast turkey for Thanksgiving. But I wanted to pick foods I know would work (because of their association with Native Americans, for instance) or that I've served or had served to me: 1 Wild duck with sauerkraut (particularly appropriate because Baltimoreans eat sauerkraut with Thanksgiving dinner anyway, which I've never understood) 2 Goose with fruit stuffing. Unfortunately the one time I cooked a wild goose, it also contained buckshot.
NEWS
By Susan Magsamen | November 22, 2007
I have a friend who married into a Baltimore family in 1997 and had a vague idea that their traditional Thanksgiving meal included sauerkraut. Eager to embrace all things dear to her dear one, she arranged for her mother to include it at their first Thanksgiving as newlywed guests in faraway northern Virginia. It turns out that this particular Baltimore family is fond of hot coleslaw, which is definitely not sauerkraut. Three years passed before she understood the difference. It's a story that will be told at their table this afternoon - and will mean something different to each person at the table - ranging from "Mom is so dumb!"
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | November 18, 2006
Thursday, most of the glory will go to the cooks of Thanksgiving dinner. But it is also a day that we gardeners can strut our stuff. If we can claim that any Thanksgiving fare -- squash, greens, even the hated Brussels sprouts -- has come from our garden, then we can brag about this accomplishment for months. The opportunity, for example, to boast that you had garden tomatoes on Thanksgiving is part of what motivates us to start rolling in the dirt in April. Having Thanksgiving tomatoes ranks right up there with having ripe tomatoes on the Fourth of July as a milestone of gardening prowess, even if the tomatoes that appear on both those occasions taste like cardboard.
NEWS
By STEPHEN G. HENDERSON and STEPHEN G. HENDERSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 4, 2006
Tiptoeing on eggshells, are you? In these dieting days of early January, total victory over vice still seems possible, but you're already wary of the R-word. (Hint: It rhymes with dissolution.) I won't eat this. ... I won't drink that. Fine. Flagellate away. But while you're at it, remember: You can resolve to eat differently, not only less. It's possible to add, not just subtract. With this in mind, here are a few tasty tips from chefs, culinary experts and other gourmands about foods that are brand-new, newly popular or that you'll be hearing more about in 2006.
NEWS
By Carol Mighton Haddix and Carol Mighton Haddix,Special to the Sun | February 10, 2002
Pork with sauerkraut is one of winter's best pairings. The rich flavor of the pork contrasts so well with the tangy kraut that this combo has been a longtime favorite of Central European countries and here in the States. The quick-cooking pork needs only 10 minutes or so and the sauerkraut requires only heating, making it the perfect weeknight meal. Before starting the pork, put a kettle of water on the stove to boil for noodles, and toss together a green salad to complete the meal. You'll be sitting down to the table in just 25 minutes.
FEATURES
By Carleton Jones | September 4, 1991
Sauerkraut, by all odds the most popular cabbage preparation of all time, has been through a recent sophistication with chefs balancing the dish against many sorts of seasonings and enriching ingredients. There's a trend toward using cabbage for colorful salads and matching up the sauerkraut with fruits and more complex flavorings to produce garnishes and pickled cabbage delicacies.Preparation need not heat up a kitchen. Here are some summertime sauerkraut ideas that include a basic make-your-own recipe, an appealing Reuben salad formula, a simple quickie braised kraut and a red cabbage and raisin garnish for cold dishes.
NEWS
By STEPHEN G. HENDERSON and STEPHEN G. HENDERSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 4, 2006
Tiptoeing on eggshells, are you? In these dieting days of early January, total victory over vice still seems possible, but you're already wary of the R-word. (Hint: It rhymes with dissolution.) I won't eat this. ... I won't drink that. Fine. Flagellate away. But while you're at it, remember: You can resolve to eat differently, not only less. It's possible to add, not just subtract. With this in mind, here are a few tasty tips from chefs, culinary experts and other gourmands about foods that are brand-new, newly popular or that you'll be hearing more about in 2006.
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