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NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | March 3, 2002
RIYADH, Saudi Arabia - An acquaintance here in Saudi Arabia told me this story: He was touring the countryside by car and got slightly lost. He saw a car down the road and approached it to ask for directions, but each time he drew near, the car sped away. Eventually he caught up to it, the car pulled over, and a terrified driver jumped out to flee: It was a Saudi woman dressed like a man. In a country where it is illegal for women to drive, that's the only way for a lady to get behind the wheel.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2014
The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Indiana State Department of Heath announced the nation's first case of Middle Eastern Respiratory Syndrome on May 2. Public health officials are keeping tabs on the virus, which has infected more than 800 people in more than a dozen countries, killing at least 310 of them, according to Reuters. But the officials don't believe the general public is at great risk. Dr. Peter Kadlecik, chief of infectious diseases with Kaiser Permanente, answers questions about this emerging virus.
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NEWS
By Mona Eltahawy | November 28, 2007
NEW YORK -- Once upon a time, in a country called South Africa, the color of your skin determined where you lived, what jobs you were allowed to have and whether you could vote. Decent countries around the world fought the evil of racial apartheid by turning South Africa into a pariah state. They barred it from global events such as the Olympics. Businesses and universities boycotted South Africa, damaging its economy and adding to the isolation of the white-minority government, which finally repealed apartheid laws in 1991.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | January 28, 2014
 Johns Hopkins Medicine is joining with a company in Saudi Arabia to form a health care company. The Baltimore medical institution said it and Saudi Aramco, an energy and chemical company with a health care arm, will open the Johns Hopkins Saudi Aramco Healthcare Company Feb. 1. Saudi Aramco and Johns Hopkins Medicine each have an indirect ownership interest in the Saudi-registered company. Saudi Aramco health care division serves about 350,000 people. “This partnership will result in a comprehensive transformation to further enhance our health care standards, and marks the beginning of a new level of care with new lines of treatment, new and enhanced specialties and subspecialties,"  Abdulaziz F. Al-Khayyal, senior vice president of industrial relations at Saudi Aramco, said in a statement.
NEWS
By Allen Keiswetter | August 3, 2005
WASHINGTON - The death of Saudi King Fahd and the ascension of Abdullah Abdulaziz al Saud, his half-brother, to the throne portend no major changes in the U.S.-Saudi relations or on issues of great importance to the United States such as oil policy or terrorism. As crown prince, Abdullah has been the de facto ruler since 1995, when King Fahd had a stroke. President Bush knows King Abdullah well, and the two have met twice at the president's ranch in Crawford, Texas. Principal changes are likely to be at home.
NEWS
By New York Times | April 25, 1991
YANBU, Saudi Arabia -- Saudi Arabia has decided to accept and shelter all Iraqi refugees now under American and Saudi control in the south of Iraq and is building a camp to accommodate as many as 50,000 people, a senior Saudi official says.The official, Lt. Gen. Khalid ibn Sultan, a prince who commanded the Arab forces in the coalition that ousted Iraq from Kuwait, also reaffirmed yesterday the kingdom's commitment to abide by international law and "Islamic humanitarian tradition" in handling nearly 14,000 Iraqi prisoners of war who do not wish to return to Iraq.
NEWS
By MEGAN K. STACK and MEGAN K. STACK,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 26, 2006
RIYADH, Saudi Arabia -- A stark dilemma lies before the rulers of this desert kingdom: How to insulate their land from the sectarian fighting in neighboring Iraq and yet find a way to counter Iran's swelling influence there. Saudi rulers would probably prefer to avoid any involvement in Iraq. But there is a growing sense here that of all the Arab countries, Saudi Arabia is the most likely to get sucked in if the violence doesn't slow. A host of ideas, virtually all controversial, are now swirling about Riyadh, from funneling arms to Sunni militias in Iraq to improving ties with Iran.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | April 22, 1991
JIDDAH, Saudi Arabia -- Secretary of State James A. Baker III received conflicting signals about a Middle East peace conference yesterday, as Saudi Arabia said it would not attend, Egypt announced its support and Israel postponed a decision on participating.Saudi Foreign Minister Prince Saud al-Faisal confirmed Mr. Baker's prediction Saturday that the kingdom would not join in a peace conference because it should be limited to Israel and the Arab nations on the Jewish state's border."Participation in the meeting traditionally has been [limited to]
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 21, 2002
JIDDAH, Saudi Arabia - A British banker was killed yesterday when a bomb shattered the sport utility vehicle he was driving through the quiet residential neighborhood where he lived in Riyadh, the capital. The 35-year-old victim, identified by Saudi police as Simon John Veness, was alone in the Land Rover Discovery when it exploded early yesterday, soon after he pulled away from the house where he lived with his wife and young son. The police said the cause of the blast was under investigation.
NEWS
By Vicki Barker and Vicki Barker,Vicki Barker is an NBC radio network reporter on assignment in Saudi Arabia | September 16, 1990
Dhahran, Saudi Arabia -- The refugee was 20 years old, a recent graduate of Kuwait University. A gold watch glittered against his starched white robe. His family fled Kuwait a few days after the invasion. He stayed on for another three weeks, trying, and failing, to hook up with the resistance. Eventually, he left."How did you get out?" he was asked."In a 1988 Mustang," he said."You drove a MUSTANG though the DESERT?!"The refugee shrugged."I didn't think the Jag would make it," he said.*For journalists, the hottest ticket in town is a Saudi visa.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | October 1, 2012
As the American Library Association kick off Banned Book Week, an annual event designed to draw attention to censorship issues, a bizarre case of visual censorship by IKEA is in the news. The Swedish furniture company acknowledged that catalogs distributed in Saudi Arabia were retouched, with women disappearing from some photos. For example, the Swedish publication Metro noted that an original photo showed a pajama-clad woman standing at a bathroom sink, with two children and a man nearby -- the very picture of "Leave it to Beaver" wholesomeness.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2012
Shiraz Maher went to the mosque in search of answers. Why, he wanted to know, had 15 young men from Saudi Arabia, the country where he spent most of his childhood, just crashed jetliners into prominent U.S. buildings? The men who gave him clarity wore fashionably tailored suits and spoke as easily of Shakespeare and Hegel as they did of the Quran. The 20-year-old Briton found these Muslims - as urbane as they were devout - completely alluring. By the time U.S. forces invaded Afghanistan three weeks later, Maher was a recruit of Hizb ut-Tahrir, or Party of Liberation, an organization devoted to creating a pan-Islamic state ruled by religious law. "America, in my mind, had gone to war with Islam," says Maher, now 30, from a sunny patio on the campus of Washington College.
NEWS
August 24, 2011
Your editorial dismissing the anti-Sharia law movement as "bigotry" was both troubling and misinformed ("Fueling anti-Islamic fears," Aug.8). It is the large parts of the Sharia code itself that are bigoted, not its opponents. Sharia is both the acknowledged goal and threat doctrine of jihadist terrorist organizations such as al-Qaida, the Taliban, Hamas and Hezbollah. Sharia is the exclusive law of the land in three countries: Saudi Arabia, Iran and Sudan, all nations that both support jihadist terrorism and have human rights records that are among the world's worst.
SPORTS
By Sports on TV | August 21, 2010
TELEVISION HIGHLIGHTS NASCAR Sprint Cup: Irwin Tools Night Race 2, 77:30 L. League Hamilton (Ohio) vs. Toms River (N.J.) ESPN11 a.m. British Columbia vs. Panama ESPN1 Columbus (Ga.) vs. Waipahu (Hawaii) 2, 73 Chinese Taipei vs. Saudi Arabia ESPN6 World Series: teams TBA ESPN8 Ripken International champ.: D.R. vs. Mexico MLBNoon U.S. champ.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | February 17, 2010
William E. Chalmers Sr., a mechanical engineer and materials-handling specialist, died Thursday of pneumonia at Anne Arundel Medical Center. He was 90. Mr. Chalmers was born in Baltimore and raised on East Oliver Street. After graduating from Polytechnic Institute in 1937, he studied engineering at the University of Maryland, College Park. In 1938, he moved to Los Angeles and went to work for North American Aviation Co., and then returned to Baltimore when he took a position at the old Glenn L. Martin Co. in Middle River.
BUSINESS
January 13, 2010
Arbitron CEO resigns amid allegations of false testimony The chief executive of media research firm Arbitron Inc. has resigned amid allegations that he provided false testimony to a congressional committee. The Columbia-based company said in a statement this week that Michael P. Skarzynski resigned because he had violated a company policy in a matter "entirely unrelated" to financial performance. U.S. Rep. Edolphus Towns, chairman of the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, said in a statement that Skarzynski might have provided false testimony during a December hearing about whether Arbitron's people meter would silence minority radio stations.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 25, 2006
GUANTANAMO BAY NAVY BASE, Cuba -- Fourteen more captives were sent home to Saudi Arabia from this detention center, the Department of Defense announced yesterday. "The department expects that there will continue to be other transfers or releases of detainees," the Pentagon said, estimating the prison camps' population as of yesterday at "about 450 detainees." The transfer was also the first since three Arab captives were found hanging in their cells two weeks ago in what the military described as the first detainee deaths at this four-year-old detention and interrogation center.
BUSINESS
By Los Angeles Times | November 6, 1991
Saudi Arabia wants to buy 72 of McDonnell Douglas Corp.'s F-15 fighter jets, the company said , in a deal that could save 20,000 aerospace jobs nationwide.It would be the largest single foreign sale of the Air Force's front-line fighter.Without the order, McDonnell Douglas would begin laying off the first of about 7,000 F-15 workers at its plant in St. Louis over the next few months, with the entire work force gone by 1993.The Air Force bought 36 F-15s this year, but it's unclear whether it will buy more, said James Reed, McDonnell Douglas spokesman.
BUSINESS
January 13, 2010
The Wilmer Eye Institute of Johns Hopkins Medicine said Tuesday that it will partner with the King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, on research, education and patient care. Together, the two internationally renowned institutions hope to cure blinding illnesses, such as diabetic eye disease. They say they will train the next generation of leaders in ophthalmology. And with financial backing from the Saudi government, Wilmer faculty will work in Riyadh. At Hopkins, there will be a new endowed professorship to support the faculty.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,brent.jones@baltsun.com | August 1, 2009
Marialou Anobas doesn't use the word "lucky" to describe herself because, as she sees it, surviving a hotel bombing and winning the lottery in the same lifetime requires more than just good fortune. Instead, the registered nurse will simply say somebody has a plan for her life, and the winding road that led her from her native Philippines, to Saudi Arabia, to Kuwait, to the United States, to winning $250,000 in Tuesday's Mega Millions drawing becomes more fulfilling every day. Anobas was one number away from claiming the $60 million jackpot.
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