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NEWS
August 1, 2003
IT'S DIFFICULT to quarrel with a president of the United States who says he's keeping secrets for the good of the country. President Bush has repeatedly used that explanation with great success to run one of the tightest-lipped administrations in memory. That ploy doesn't work so well, however, when others familiar with the secret material in question blow the whistle on it. Now Mr. Bush has got pesky senators from both parties contending there's no security reason for the president not to release up to 95 percent of the still-classified portions of a congressional investigation into intelligence failures that preceded the Sept.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | January 28, 2014
 Johns Hopkins Medicine is joining with a company in Saudi Arabia to form a health care company. The Baltimore medical institution said it and Saudi Aramco, an energy and chemical company with a health care arm, will open the Johns Hopkins Saudi Aramco Healthcare Company Feb. 1. Saudi Aramco and Johns Hopkins Medicine each have an indirect ownership interest in the Saudi-registered company. Saudi Aramco health care division serves about 350,000 people. “This partnership will result in a comprehensive transformation to further enhance our health care standards, and marks the beginning of a new level of care with new lines of treatment, new and enhanced specialties and subspecialties,"  Abdulaziz F. Al-Khayyal, senior vice president of industrial relations at Saudi Aramco, said in a statement.
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NEWS
By Maureen Dowd | August 30, 2002
WASHINGTON -- I was dubious at first. But now I think Dick Cheney has it right. Making the case for going to war in the Middle East to veterans on Monday, the vice president said that "our goal would be ... a government that is democratic and pluralistic, a nation where the human rights of every ethnic and religious group are recognized and protected." OK, I'm on board. Let's declare war on Saudi Arabia! Let's do "regime change" in a kingdom that gives medieval a bad name. By overthrowing the Saudi monarchy, the Cheney-Rummy-Condi-Wolfy-Perle-Dubya contingent could realize its dream of redrawing the Middle East map. Once everyone realizes that we're no longer being hypocrites, coddling a corrupt, repressive dictatorship that sponsors terrorism even as we plot to crush a corrupt, repressive dictatorship that sponsors terrorism, it will transform our relationship with the Arab world.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2013
Defense contractors Lockheed Martin and Northrop Grumman said Thursday that they've won a $91 million contract for radars to be used on Saudi Arabia's Apache attack helicopters. Northrop Grumman said its share of the Longbow work would be handled from its electronic systems division in Linthicum. Lockheed Martin is based in Bethesda. The companies said the contract is for Longbow Fire Control Radars for the Royal Saudi Land Forces Aviation Command and the Saudi Arabia National Guard, spares and support for the aviation command and Longbow mast mounted assemblies for the U.S. Army.
FEATURES
By N.Y. Times News Service | June 19, 1991
When the designer Vicky Tiel introduced her fragrance last year, it was a big hit among Saudi Arabians in Paris but it was less than acceptable to the Saudi government.The perfume's bottle, which featured a stopper in the shape of a nude, turned out to be too risque for Saudi Arabian customs officials, who impounded the first shipments after the end of the war in the Persian Gulf.Tiel has redesigned the bottle, eliminating the naked touches. She expects to sell $1 million worth of fragrance in Saudi Arabia this year.
NEWS
By PETER W. WILSON | December 1, 1991
Saudi monarch King Fahd's fears have been realized the past few months, as his normally docile citizens have grown more and more insistent that the ruling family's absolute powers be checked.Emboldened by the events in Kuwait, where the emir is being pressured by his subjects and the United States to make democratic concessions, two groups of Saudi notables recently presented petitions to Fahd, demanding a greater voice in the country's management. And to insure that their demands were not brushed aside, both groups took the highly unusual step of leaking them to the Egyptian press, which readily published them.
NEWS
By THE NEW YORK TIMES | December 18, 2005
Urgently trying to improve relations with the United States, the Saudi Arabian government has been promoting a scholarship program that has more than doubled the number of Saudi enrollments at American colleges and universities since last year. The program, aimed in part at reducing widespread hostility in the Saudi public toward the United States, has reversed a steady plunge in Saudi students that started immediately after the Sept. 11, 2001, terror attacks. The Saudi government offered 5,000 students full four-year scholarships, complete with living allowances.
NEWS
By New York Times | April 9, 1991
WASHINGTON -- After sustained lobbying from the Saudi Arabian Embassy, the Bush administration has asked a federal appeals court to reverse a ruling that allows the Saudi government to be sued in the United States for the reported torture of an American.In taking the unusual step, the administration contends that an important national interest exists in reversing the ruling -- to prevent foreign governments from retaliating by allowing American officials to be sued in their courts.A three-judge panel ruled unanimously Feb. 21 that Scott J. Nelson of Raleigh, N.C., could bring suit against the Saudi government for what he says was a severe beating during his imprisonment in 1984.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Staff Writer | May 20, 1993
A Maryland-based arm of the Saudi health ministry that buy supplies for that country's royal hospital may not claim sovereign immunity in fighting a sex discrimination complaint, an administrative law judge has ruled.Royspec Purchasing Services, an agency of the Saudi government based near Baltimore-Washington International Airport, argued in a March hearing that it was immune from the complaint brought by the Maryland Human Relations Commission.A former Royspec purchasing agent, Marian Heymann of Pasadena, charged in 1987 that sex bias by her employer forced her to quit a $40,000-a-year job after six years with the agency.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | March 24, 1993
WASHINGTON -- An American who worked overseas for the Saudi Arabian government cannot complain in U.S. courts about being jailed there on trumped-up charges and tortured by security police, the Supreme Court ruled 8-1 yesterday.In a separate decision with potentially broad sweep, the court ruled 5-4 yesterday that children without parents or a guardian who are picked up by law enforcement officers have no constitutional right to be let out of a government detention facility, even if they are not accused of a crime.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2012
Paul B. Moore, a former Evening Sun reporter and editor who later became a public relations executive, died Nov. 27 from complications of prostate cancer at his Homeland residence. He was 84. "Paul was a very conscientious reporter and a very conscientious person. He was very talented and what he did, he did well," said Helen Delich Bentley, a former newsroom colleague who later became a congresswoman and federal maritime commissioner. "As a reporter, he was always fair, and wherever he went always looked for something interesting and challenging," said Mrs. Bentley.
NEWS
Ron Smith | October 13, 2011
Do you feel another war coming our way? Say, with Iran? This week's announcement by Attorney General Eric Holder of the foiling of an alleged plot to blow up the Saudi ambassador to the United States while he dined in a Washington restaurant has been seized upon by the usual media suspects as an "Iranian terrorist plot" and more than enough reason to further tighten the screws on Tehran. A 56-year-old American citizen, Manssor Arbabsiar, who also holds an Iranian passport, was arrested and charged along with another man, still living in Iran, who is said to be a member of the Quds force, an "elite" unit of the Iranian army reportedly tasked with "exporting Iran's Islamic revolution.
NEWS
October 12, 2011
The bizarre plot federal law enforcement officials described Tuesday in which elements of the Iranian government are accused of trying to blow up Saudi Arabia's ambassador to the U.S. with explosives planted in a Washington restaurant sounds like something out of a spy novel. FBI Director Robert S. Mueller III acknowledged as much at the news conference announcing the arrest of one of the alleged conspirators. Yet if true, the charges represent an unprecedented and intolerable provocation by a regime long known for exporting terrorism, and they demand the strongest possible response - short of direct military action - from the U.S. and the international community.
NEWS
By Gal Luft | June 1, 2011
At a time when Americans are engaged in a heated debate about cutting domestic social services and entitlement programs, we are forced to fund more and more social programs — for other nations. How so? In February, after seeing fellow Sunni Muslim regimes destabilizing throughout the Middle East, Saudi King Abdullah rushed back from New York, where he was recovering from a back injury, to the kingdom to stave off any potential spillover. After all, if Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak had been ousted, anyone could be. In an attempt to pacify its subjects, the House of Saud announced a "stimulus package" that included an increase in subsidies, a 15 percent salary raise to all government employees, and housing benefits to military and religious groups in exchange for support of his ban on protests.
BUSINESS
January 13, 2010
The Wilmer Eye Institute of Johns Hopkins Medicine said Tuesday that it will partner with the King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, on research, education and patient care. Together, the two internationally renowned institutions hope to cure blinding illnesses, such as diabetic eye disease. They say they will train the next generation of leaders in ophthalmology. And with financial backing from the Saudi government, Wilmer faculty will work in Riyadh. At Hopkins, there will be a new endowed professorship to support the faculty.
NEWS
By Bob Woodward and Bob Woodward,The Washington Post | January 14, 2009
WASHINGTON - The top Bush administration official in charge of deciding whether to bring Guantanamo Bay detainees to trial has concluded that the U.S. military tortured a Saudi national who allegedly planned to participate in the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, interrogating him with techniques that included sustained isolation, sleep deprivation, nudity and prolonged exposure to cold, leaving him in a "life-threatening condition." "We tortured [Mohammed al-] Qahtani," Susan Crawford said in her first interview since being named convening authority of military commissions by Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates in February 2007.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 16, 2002
WASHINGTON - More than 600 families who lost loved ones in the terrorist attacks Sept. 11 filed a lawsuit yesterday against three Saudi princes, seven international banks, the government of Sudan and eight Islamic charities for allegedly supporting terrorist leader Osama bin Laden and his al-Qaida network. The suit, which seeks "hundreds of billions" of dollars in damages, claims, "These entities, cloaked in a thin veil of legitimacy, were and are the true enablers of terrorism." It was filed in U.S. District Court in Washington.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 8, 2003
CAIRO, Egypt - Commentators across the Middle East yesterday largely dismissed President Bush's speech calling for wider democracy in the region, labeling it something for domestic consumption to justify the war in Iraq rather than signaling a real change in U.S. policy. Political analysts, while welcoming the idea of ending decades of support for dictatorships, dwelt on the usual gap between ideals and what the Bush administration actually does in the Middle East. The most common conclusion was that until the United States does something concrete to force Israel to free millions of Palestinians kept under military occupation, all U.S. statements about greater democracy and freedom will ring hollow.
NEWS
By Sarah Weinman | June 29, 2008
Finding Nouf By Zoe Ferraris Houghton Mifflin / 306 pages / $24 One of the best developments in contemporary crime fiction of late is how willing, even eager, writers are to explore uncharted territory. What with the miniboom of translated Scandinavian novels by Arnaldur Indridason, Karin Fossum and Jo Nesbo (to name just a handful), Deon Meyer's and Michael Stanley's criminal investigations in the wilds of Africa and Matt Beynon Rees' elegant mysteries set in Palestinian territories, readers have an embarrassment of global riches to choose from.
NEWS
By Jeffrey Fleishman and Jeffrey Fleishman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 6, 2007
CAIRO, Egypt -- The dwindling possibility of a U.S. attack on Iran is changing the dynamics of Middle East politics and raising Arab concern that Tehran now feels emboldened to strengthen its military, increase support for Islamic radicals and exert more influence in the region's troubled countries. Saudi Arabia and other Arab nations opposed military action against Iran's nuclear program. But they were privately relieved that Washington's threats kept Tehran preoccupied, despite its manipulation of politics in Iraq and Lebanon and its support of the militant Islamic group Hamas in the Gaza Strip.
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