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NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,Special to the Sun | July 27, 2003
Across the state, yoga teachers are spinning out instructions and inspiration, while students of all ages bend, stretch and sometimes creak their way into unfamiliar positions. What keeps them coming back is a feeling of relaxed fitness and overall well-being that has fueled a yoga boom in Baltimore. But booms crest, and not everyone is convinced that yoga's latest surge in popularity can support all the studios and teachers that make up the Baltimore-area yoga scene. Some are even wondering how much yoga is too much.
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FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | February 22, 1998
Look, up on the wall -- it's a bird, it's a plane, it's a hot-air balloon, it's Carrera marble, it's Cezanne ...In fact, it's wallpaper.Not so long ago a world of tiny pastel florals and subtle stripes, the realm of wallpaper today is dominated by saturated colors, texture, coordinates of prints, borders and fabrics, and faux finishes that, at $20 to $30 a roll, cost far less than hand-painted originals. There are novelty papers that look like shelves of books or botanical prints. Papers in purple, burgundy and forest green abound.
NEWS
By Dee Wright | February 2, 2011
The Baltimore City Police Department and the local media deserve an "A" for muscling the disappearance of 17-year-old Phylicia Simone Barnes onto the national stage. But the national media deserve a failing grade. Ms. Barnes, a straight "A" black student from North Carolina, vanished Dec. 28 while visiting relatives in Baltimore. After unprecedented local media saturation and 24/7 police searches failed to discover the missing girl, Anthony Guglielmi, spokesman for the Baltimore City Police Department, pleaded for the national media to give Ms. Barnes' disappearance the same broad coverage as that given other missing young women.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Staff | May 23, 1999
Fans can't wait for the movie to come out. For years they've chattered endlessly among themselves, debating who should be cast, speculating on the fate of certain characters (would they even show up in the film?), desperately hanging on every word that leaks out of the set.The nation's press trips over itself, running story after story about a film that is months away from opening. Advance screenings are closely guarded secrets; anyone lucky enough to get into one becomes an automatic Big Man On Campus.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | August 22, 2002
These officers have defined cool. This month, Anne Arundel County's Eastern District police began the second wave of a program they're calling Cops Out On Loan - COOL for short. The program borrows about a dozen officers - from the tactical patrol unit and each of the four shifts - for a month to target a small geographical area experiencing a crime wave. Eastern District lieutenants created the first unit in spring after they determined that a small area around North Arundel Hospital accounted for 67 percent of the district's robberies from January through March.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2004
Little is more soothing than the alliterative murmur of C-SPAN during a vote on the floor of the U.S. Senate. It goes something like this: "Senator Akaka? Senator Akaka - Ayyyyyyye." "Senator Alexander? Senator Alexander - Ayyyyyye." "Senator Allard? ... " Sleeping pills should be so potent. But that's part of C-SPAN's appeal. Without succumbing to flash, without creating a splash, the public affairs cable channel provides unencumbered access to the workings of the federal government - in hearings, during votes, and through respectful questioning of actual lawmakers who also face the uncensored queries of callers.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 19, 1998
If you think television couldn't possibly report the Clinton-Starr-Lewinsky drama any more breathlessly than it has in the last week, wait till the videotape of the President's grand jury testimony is released Monday.Three all-news cable channels -- MSNBC, Fox and CNN -- have promised to run the uncut, unedited testimony the instant it is received from the House of Representatives, ratcheting up their soap opera coverage yet another notch despite poll after poll in which viewers say they have heard enough about the matter and want to move on.And that is the big disconnect: While cable news reports round-the-clock that the President is all but finished, the polls on Clinton's approval ratings and the public's attitude toward impeachment suggest a different social reality.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | September 29, 2008
Baltimore residents will be the first in the country today to have access to a next-generation broadband network built by a major wireless company - a step that turns much of the city into a "hot spot" for Web surfing on the move. Called XOHM, Sprint Nextel Corp.'s network represents the next big step in the telecommunication industry's race to build more robust broadband services, as consumers increasingly navigate the Web with laptops and mobile devices. Using a technology standard known as WiMAX, Sprint's network is akin to the so-called Wi-Fi "hot spot" you might find at a coffee shop.
HEALTH
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2011
It was a few days after Christmas when 16-year-old Amanda Custer and her mom made a rare stop for a takeout burger. The indulgence ended badly for Amanda. Soon after, she said, "I felt real nauseous. Food was, like, gross. I got really bad cramps, a whole bunch of heartburn and an upset stomach. " And it didn't go away. "I would feel OK and try to eat something, and then I'd regret it," she recalled. "The pain afterwards was horrible. A couple of hours after I ate, I'd be going to the bathroom, feeling nauseous.
SPORTS
By Brad Snyder and Brad Snyder,SUN STAFF | May 19, 1996
Mark "Moonie" Armacost vowed not to come to the Preakness this year unless he could act like a horse's rear end.Most infield partygoers pulled that off with the help of alcohol, loud music and skimpy outfits.Armacost took the challenge literally, renting a brown-and-white horse costume for $80 with his friend, Chuck Gavai."We thought it would be cool if somebody showed up at the Preakness with a horse suit on," said Gavai, 27, of Dunkirk, who made up the horse's better half.Gavai, a painter, got to be the horse's head because he went to Ellicott City and rented the suit.
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