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Satisfactory

NEWS
By Victor Paul Alvarez and Victor Paul Alvarez,Staff Writer | June 20, 1993
The percentage of Harford students who received at least satisfactory scores on new state performance tests exceeded that of the state as a whole.But Harford schools fell far short of tough new standards the state expects to reach by 1996.Results, released Tuesday, show the Harford third-, fifth- and eighth-graders who took the Maryland State Performance Assessment Program tests in the spring of 1992 averaged higher scores than those for the state as a whole in reading, math, science and social studies.
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NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Staff Writer | June 16, 1993
Also in some editions, a story on city students' scores on statewide performance tests should have said that 45.9 percent of fifth-graders statewide scored "satisfactory" or "excellent" on the math test.The Sun regrets the errors.Baltimore schools have a long way to go in meeting ambitious state standards for student performance, according to a battery of 1992 test results released yesterday.The new state tests, which measure how well students use what they learn in the classroom, are a key part of the Maryland State Performance Assessment Program, intended to hold individual schools accountable for student performance.
NEWS
By Staff Report | June 9, 1993
The Maryland State Department of Education will have four public meetings on the proposed standards for the Maryland School Performance Assessment tests given to all third-, fifth- and eighth-graders in the state.The tests, which cover reading, mathematics, social studies and science, are graded from 1 -- the highest -- to 5 -- the lowest.Two committees are recommending the following standards, based on those proficiency levels:* Satisfactory: For a school to get a satisfactory rating, at least 70 percent of the students tested would have to score at level 3 or better.
NEWS
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Staff Writer | November 17, 1992
Harford schools are moving steadily toward meeting statewide requirements by 1995, but there is still a wide disparity in scores between students in wealthier areas and students who live in poorer areas."
BUSINESS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,New York Bureau | April 8, 1992
NEW YORK -- In the kind of annual meeting that occurs only among closely knit board members after a satisfactory -- if not great -- year, directors of Life Technologies Inc. ratified new members, reviewed last year's results and gave indications of better times ahead, all in about 20 minutes yesterday.The meeting at New York's opulent Metropolitan Club attracted few observers. Chief Executive J. Stark Thompson noted that Life Tech took a $1.2 million charge to cover a reduction in its work force to 1,300 employees from about 1,350, the first cut since the company was created a decade ago from the merger of two biotechnology concerns.
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson | November 14, 1991
In a table showing performance of Baltimore's elementary schools in yesterday's editions of The Sun, the heading showing the "Satisfactory" level of attendence according to State Board of Education standards was incorrect. The satisfactory attendence level should have been 94 percent.* The Sun regrets the error.A chart in some editions of The Sun yesterday describing the performance of Chinquapin Middle School incorrectly reported the state standard for satisfactory attendance in middle school.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff writer | November 13, 1991
Wow! What a performance.Carroll students passed state muster in 11 of the 13 knowledge and other areas of the Maryland School Performance Program, which evaluates each district against academic and pupil participation criteria. Carroll achieved the state's "satisfactory"or "excellent" standards in all but writing and secondary school attendance, ranking the district third among Maryland's 24 districts."We're very pleased with the results," Superintendent R. Edward Shilling said yesterday.
NEWS
By Dianne Williams Hayes and Dianne Williams Hayes,Staff writer | November 12, 1991
The county school system showed marked improvement over last year's dismal state report card, exceeding state standards in two categoriesand ranking satisfactory in four of 13 areas.Last year, the county earned an excellent ranking only in elementary school promotion rates and a satisfactory score only in elementary attendance. Scores inthe remaining 11 areas did not meet state standards.School systems were judged as excellent, satisfactory or not meeting the standards. Two sets of test scores were reported: students taking the test for the first time, usually in ninth or 10th grades, and students ending 11th grade.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff writer | November 6, 1991
How Carroll educators evaluate student achievement on the state's second annual report card won't be known until Nov. 12.But it's clear students made progress in some areas while falling short in others.Perhaps the most surprising statistic is the drop in Carroll's writing scores, which fell from 95.7 percent to 85.3 percent, placing the district below the state-set goal of 90 percent."I would be interested to know what areas of writing fell," said Cindy Cummings, president of the Carroll County Education Association, which representsabout 1,300 teachers.
SPORTS
By Rich Hofmann | July 3, 1991
PHILADELPHIA -- Taking shots at the NCAA is normally such a simple task. For decades now, the people in charge of college athletics have been an unrelenting study in both blindness and arrogance, the easiest of targets.Equal justice? Forget it.Obsessed with inconsequential nit-picking? Always.Concern for minorities? Hah.Concern for the athletes? Hah-hah.But that was then, and this is now. And the NCAA Presidents Commission last week did a few things that received scant public notice, but that are really good things.
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