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Satisfactory

NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Rona Kobell and Stephen Kiehl and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | January 16, 2004
The company that owns the tanker that exploded on Interstate 95 this week received a "deficient" accident rating from a federal safety agency because its trucks have been involved in a high number of crashes in the past few years. Texas-based Petro-Chemical Transport's 300 trucks were involved in 30 accidents in the past year, though none as serious as the explosion Tuesday that killed four people and shut down part of the East Coast's major thoroughfare for four hours. The number of accidents led to a rating of 97 on the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration's 100-point scale, on which 100 is the worst score and zero the best.
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NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Rona Kobell and Stephen Kiehl and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | January 16, 2004
The company that owns the tanker that exploded on Interstate 95 this week received a "deficient" accident rating from a federal safety agency because its trucks have been involved in a high number of crashes in the past few years. Texas-based Petro-Chemical Transport's 300 trucks were involved in 30 accidents in the past year, though none as serious as the explosion Tuesday that killed four people and shut down part of the East Coast's major thoroughfare for four hours. The number of accidents led to a rating of 97 on the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration's 100-point scale, on which 100 is the worst score and zero the best.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2001
Giving itself more time to study the popular but much debated policy, the Howard County Board of Education voted last night to continue for one year its moratorium on open enrollment. "When we voted to have the moratorium, I knew one year would not be sufficient to gather any kind of data you need to come to any real conclusions," board member Sandra H. French said. The 20-year open enrollment policy allows parents to send their children to any school with empty seats so long as they provide their own transportation.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2002
County Council members seemed delighted yesterday with an ambitious school board plan to attack the achievement gap among students in Howard County schools. The plan, outlined by school officials last month, aims to have at least 70 percent of Howard's students scoring at the satisfactory level on state standardized tests by 2005, and to eliminate the achievement gap among white, black and Hispanic students by 2007. Although stressing efforts to improve student performance in every county school, the plan targets 15 - mostly older Columbia schools for attention.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | January 26, 1996
Margaret C. Wicks is the principal of a Baltimore elementary school that the state of Maryland says is a failure.According to results of the Maryland School Performance Assessment Program test, not a single student in last year's third grade at Holabird Elementary met minimum statewide standards in science or reading. In the fifth grade, no one achieved a satisfactory score in reading, social studies, writing or science.Every single one of those students was passed on to the next grade.And that was enough to prompt the state to list Holabird Elementary among 35 schools that it says must be improved or removed from the city's control.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | March 8, 2002
Howard County will reach the state's goal of at least 70 percent of its students scoring satisfactorily on the annual MSPAP achievement exams by 2005, local school officials said last night, and gaps between that state standard and test performance by African-American and Hispanic students will be eliminated by 2007. That's the crux of an ambitious plan announced by the school system's associate superintendent for curriculum and instruction, Kimberly Statham, in response to a disappointing trend of flat or declining scores on the yearly Maryland School Performance Assessment Program exams.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 11, 2000
LOUISVILLE, Neb. - The election Nov. 7 was one of the closest ever. Voters were evenly split. The outcome was still in question after Election Night. And history will praise two candidates for moving with grace and civility to reach a fair solution. The voters in Louisville (eastern Nebraskans call it LEWIS-ville) expected to know shortly after the polls closed who would represent them on the City Council. But Gregory Manley, who works for a sewer and paving contractor in Omaha, and Cletus Petrzilka, who was retired from the electric company, were in a race that was too close to call.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 25, 1996
I have a 6-year-old son in good health who has an interesting problem.For the last year or so, one of his outer ears sometimes becomes very hot to the touch and bright red. This can happen when he is resting, bouncing around or even eating. It doesn't seem to have any pattern, except that it is only one ear at a time. He doesn't have a cold or an ear infection when this happens.Someone said it is blood pressure, so I am concerned. I have asked doctors in the past who brush it off. Please let me know what you think.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2014
The mother of an Ellicott City man who died a year ago following an obstacle race in West Virginia has filed a wrongful-death lawsuit against the organizers of the Tough Mudder event. Mita Sengupta, mother of Avishek Sengupta, claims that Tough Mudder was negligent in moving mud racers through a "walk the plank" obstacle, and did not provide proper supervision or safety precautions. She filed the lawsuit in Marshall County Circuit Court in West Virginia last month and is seeking unspecified damages and attorneys' fees.
HEALTH
Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2013
Many men will experience prostate enlargement as they get older, some to the point that it will cause urination problems. Dr. Michael Naslund, director of the Maryland Prostate Center at the University Maryland Medical Center, said there are many options for treatment, including surgery, drugs and lifestyle changes. What is the prostate and how does it function in the body? The prostate gland sits beneath the bladder in men. The primary function of the prostate in a young man is to produce some of the fluid in the ejaculate and to transport urine and sperm out of the body through the urethra.
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