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Satisfactory

NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Rona Kobell and Stephen Kiehl and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | January 16, 2004
The company that owns the tanker that exploded on Interstate 95 this week received a "deficient" accident rating from a federal safety agency because its trucks have been involved in a high number of crashes in the past few years. Texas-based Petro-Chemical Transport's 300 trucks were involved in 30 accidents in the past year, though none as serious as the explosion Tuesday that killed four people and shut down part of the East Coast's major thoroughfare for four hours. The number of accidents led to a rating of 97 on the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration's 100-point scale, on which 100 is the worst score and zero the best.
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NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Rona Kobell and Stephen Kiehl and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | January 16, 2004
The company that owns the tanker that exploded on Interstate 95 this week received a "deficient" accident rating from a federal safety agency because its trucks have been involved in a high number of crashes in the past few years. Texas-based Petro-Chemical Transport's 300 trucks were involved in 30 accidents in the past year, though none as serious as the explosion Tuesday that killed four people and shut down part of the East Coast's major thoroughfare for four hours. The number of accidents led to a rating of 97 on the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration's 100-point scale, on which 100 is the worst score and zero the best.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2002
County Council members seemed delighted yesterday with an ambitious school board plan to attack the achievement gap among students in Howard County schools. The plan, outlined by school officials last month, aims to have at least 70 percent of Howard's students scoring at the satisfactory level on state standardized tests by 2005, and to eliminate the achievement gap among white, black and Hispanic students by 2007. Although stressing efforts to improve student performance in every county school, the plan targets 15 - mostly older Columbia schools for attention.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2001
Giving itself more time to study the popular but much debated policy, the Howard County Board of Education voted last night to continue for one year its moratorium on open enrollment. "When we voted to have the moratorium, I knew one year would not be sufficient to gather any kind of data you need to come to any real conclusions," board member Sandra H. French said. The 20-year open enrollment policy allows parents to send their children to any school with empty seats so long as they provide their own transportation.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | January 26, 1996
Margaret C. Wicks is the principal of a Baltimore elementary school that the state of Maryland says is a failure.According to results of the Maryland School Performance Assessment Program test, not a single student in last year's third grade at Holabird Elementary met minimum statewide standards in science or reading. In the fifth grade, no one achieved a satisfactory score in reading, social studies, writing or science.Every single one of those students was passed on to the next grade.And that was enough to prompt the state to list Holabird Elementary among 35 schools that it says must be improved or removed from the city's control.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | March 8, 2002
Howard County will reach the state's goal of at least 70 percent of its students scoring satisfactorily on the annual MSPAP achievement exams by 2005, local school officials said last night, and gaps between that state standard and test performance by African-American and Hispanic students will be eliminated by 2007. That's the crux of an ambitious plan announced by the school system's associate superintendent for curriculum and instruction, Kimberly Statham, in response to a disappointing trend of flat or declining scores on the yearly Maryland School Performance Assessment Program exams.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 11, 2000
LOUISVILLE, Neb. - The election Nov. 7 was one of the closest ever. Voters were evenly split. The outcome was still in question after Election Night. And history will praise two candidates for moving with grace and civility to reach a fair solution. The voters in Louisville (eastern Nebraskans call it LEWIS-ville) expected to know shortly after the polls closed who would represent them on the City Council. But Gregory Manley, who works for a sewer and paving contractor in Omaha, and Cletus Petrzilka, who was retired from the electric company, were in a race that was too close to call.
FEATURES
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Evening Sun Staff | November 13, 1990
WHAT DOES it mean when you hear that a dear friend has had a heart attack and is in the hospital in critical condition? Just how bad is critical? You might call the hospital the next day and be told his condition is stable. Does that mean he is out of danger now?Perhaps you read about an accident on I-95 in which three local teen-agers are hurt. The paper says one of the passengers was hospitalized in critical condition. The next day you read that the teen's condition is guarded. Does that mean he is getting better or worse?
SPORTS
By Jerry Bembry and Jerry Bembry,SUN STAFF | July 10, 1996
Contract talks for some of the NBA's top free agents -- including Washington Bullets forward Juwan Howard -- will get under way tomorrow after the league yesterday briefly imposed a lockout, only to reverse itself later after finally reaching an agreement with the players association.Yesterday's lockout, coming after both sides initially could not reach an agreement in the dispersal of $50 million in profit sharing, forced the cancellation of talks yesterday between the Bullets and Howard that were to take place at the Chevy Chase offices of agent David Falk.
BUSINESS
By Dean Uhler | May 19, 2002
Bob and Sue Locke are planning to have central air conditioning installed in their 55-year-old Cape Cod home. It will be a single-zone system, with the air handler situated in the attic. Their question is whether the central air installation will require them to have their electrical service upgraded. The heating and air-conditioning contractors from whom they've gotten estimates have differing opinions. Their house has gas heat, a gas range, a gas clothes dryer and a gas-fired water heater.
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