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Satisfactory

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By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,New York Bureau | April 8, 1992
NEW YORK -- In the kind of annual meeting that occurs only among closely knit board members after a satisfactory -- if not great -- year, directors of Life Technologies Inc. ratified new members, reviewed last year's results and gave indications of better times ahead, all in about 20 minutes yesterday.The meeting at New York's opulent Metropolitan Club attracted few observers. Chief Executive J. Stark Thompson noted that Life Tech took a $1.2 million charge to cover a reduction in its work force to 1,300 employees from about 1,350, the first cut since the company was created a decade ago from the merger of two biotechnology concerns.
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NEWS
By JAMES GERSTENZANG and JAMES GERSTENZANG,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 17, 2006
WASHINGTON -- President Bush broke his public silence yesterday about Vice President Dick Cheney's shooting of a hunting companion, declaring that Cheney had delivered "a very strong and powerful explanation" of the incident. The sheriff's office looking into the shooting said it had ended its investigation and no charges would be filed. Bush said he had no complaints with the manner in which Cheney handled the disclosure of the shooting, which came a day after the incident occurred. But asked whether he was "satisfied with the timing," the president said: "I'm satisfied with the explanation he gave."
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NEWS
November 21, 1990
Schools in the Baltimore area are barely passing in their efforts to teach, according to callers to The Evening Sun's SUNDIAL. Of 289 callers, 33 percent (95 callers) said their schools were excellent, 27 percent (78 callers) said their schools were satisfactory and 40 percent (116 callers) said their schools were failing.A city and county breakdown follows:* Baltimore city: Total, 98; Excellent, 39 percent (38 callers); Satisfactory, 14 percent (14 callers); Failing, 47 percent (46 callers)
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Rona Kobell and Stephen Kiehl and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | January 16, 2004
The company that owns the tanker that exploded on Interstate 95 this week received a "deficient" accident rating from a federal safety agency because its trucks have been involved in a high number of crashes in the past few years. Texas-based Petro-Chemical Transport's 300 trucks were involved in 30 accidents in the past year, though none as serious as the explosion Tuesday that killed four people and shut down part of the East Coast's major thoroughfare for four hours. The number of accidents led to a rating of 97 on the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration's 100-point scale, on which 100 is the worst score and zero the best.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Sun Staff Writer | January 18, 1995
Baltimore County school scores on state-ordered performance tests improved last year, with elementary schools registering what school officials called "strong gains" and middle schools showing considerable improvement.The officials praised the progress yesterday in releasing individual school results on the Maryland School Performance Assessment Program tests at a news conference.Still, only about a fifth of the elementary schools -- 20 out of 98 -- achieved the state standard of satisfactory on one or more of the six tests given to third- and fifth-graders each spring.
NEWS
December 23, 1996
In line with statewide trends, Baltimore city third-graders showed declines in math, science and social studies in the tests given last May as part of the 1996 Maryland School Performance Assessment Program.Overall, schools showed little movement, disappointing school officials who were hoping for signs that the city might be on its way up from last place in the state.On average, 13.5 percent of Baltimore third-, fifth- and eighth-graders earned satisfactory scores on the tests, down from 13.8 percent last year.
NEWS
By Maryland State Department of Education | December 18, 1994
These charts show the percentage of students in each Carroll elementary and middle school who met the excellent and satisfactory standards in each subject area in 1993 and 1994. The State Department of Education goals are for 25 percent of the students to attain the excellent level and for 70 percent to reach the satisfactory level. (The satisfactory percentage also includes those in the excellent category.) The State excluded 1993 data for third-grade reading and eighth-grade science because of concerns about the validity of those results statewide.
NEWS
By Dianne Williams Hayes and Dianne Williams Hayes,Staff writer | November 12, 1991
The county school system showed marked improvement over last year's dismal state report card, exceeding state standards in two categoriesand ranking satisfactory in four of 13 areas.Last year, the county earned an excellent ranking only in elementary school promotion rates and a satisfactory score only in elementary attendance. Scores inthe remaining 11 areas did not meet state standards.School systems were judged as excellent, satisfactory or not meeting the standards. Two sets of test scores were reported: students taking the test for the first time, usually in ninth or 10th grades, and students ending 11th grade.
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Evening Sun Staff | November 19, 1990
Maryland schools failed to meet all but two of the state's eight performance standards in the last school year, according to a report issued today by the state Department of Education.Overall, the state's public schools failed to make "satisfactory" grades on any of the four basic competency tests given to ninth graders: reading, writing, mathematics and citizenship.The schools' seventh-through-12-grade attendance and the high school dropout rate were less than satisfactory. Maryland schools made satisfactory grades in first-through-sixth-grade attendance and promotion.
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Staff Writer | June 16, 1993
Also in some editions, a story on city students' scores on statewide performance tests should have said that 45.9 percent of fifth-graders statewide scored "satisfactory" or "excellent" on the math test.The Sun regrets the errors.Baltimore schools have a long way to go in meeting ambitious state standards for student performance, according to a battery of 1992 test results released yesterday.The new state tests, which measure how well students use what they learn in the classroom, are a key part of the Maryland State Performance Assessment Program, intended to hold individual schools accountable for student performance.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Rona Kobell and Stephen Kiehl and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | January 16, 2004
The company that owns the tanker that exploded on Interstate 95 this week received a "deficient" accident rating from a federal safety agency because its trucks have been involved in a high number of crashes in the past few years. Texas-based Petro-Chemical Transport's 300 trucks were involved in 30 accidents in the past year, though none as serious as the explosion Tuesday that killed four people and shut down part of the East Coast's major thoroughfare for four hours. The number of accidents led to a rating of 97 on the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration's 100-point scale, on which 100 is the worst score and zero the best.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 14, 2003
I really like Outtakes, a new upscale carryout and catering operation in Cockeysville. The food was terrific, the service couldn't have been friendlier and the chef, Donald Spence, lovingly walked me through his menu. I do have a question, though. What the heck is this place doing in a strip mall anchored by a tire outlet? Just another one of those odd juxtapositions of suburban living, I suppose. Despite its somewhat incongruous location, Outtakes Celebrity Caterers could have a bright future.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2002
County Council members seemed delighted yesterday with an ambitious school board plan to attack the achievement gap among students in Howard County schools. The plan, outlined by school officials last month, aims to have at least 70 percent of Howard's students scoring at the satisfactory level on state standardized tests by 2005, and to eliminate the achievement gap among white, black and Hispanic students by 2007. Although stressing efforts to improve student performance in every county school, the plan targets 15 - mostly older Columbia schools for attention.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | March 8, 2002
Howard County will reach the state's goal of at least 70 percent of its students scoring satisfactorily on the annual MSPAP achievement exams by 2005, local school officials said last night, and gaps between that state standard and test performance by African-American and Hispanic students will be eliminated by 2007. That's the crux of an ambitious plan announced by the school system's associate superintendent for curriculum and instruction, Kimberly Statham, in response to a disappointing trend of flat or declining scores on the yearly Maryland School Performance Assessment Program exams.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | July 21, 2001
T. Rowe Price Group Inc., which has been cutting expenses in the face of a sour stock market, said yesterday that its second-quarter profit fell 26 percent as assets under management declined and the company took a $7 million charge related to an acquisition. Price, a Baltimore-based mutual fund company, made $51.2 million in the quarter that ended June 30, or 40 cents per diluted share, compared with $69.3 million, or 54 cents, in the second quarter of 2000. The write off of goodwill associated with the acquisition of T. Rowe Price International in August 2000 shaved 5 cents per diluted share from earnings.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2001
Giving itself more time to study the popular but much debated policy, the Howard County Board of Education voted last night to continue for one year its moratorium on open enrollment. "When we voted to have the moratorium, I knew one year would not be sufficient to gather any kind of data you need to come to any real conclusions," board member Sandra H. French said. The 20-year open enrollment policy allows parents to send their children to any school with empty seats so long as they provide their own transportation.
NEWS
By Victor Paul Alvarez and Victor Paul Alvarez,Staff Writer | June 20, 1993
The percentage of Harford students who received at least satisfactory scores on new state performance tests exceeded that of the state as a whole.But Harford schools fell far short of tough new standards the state expects to reach by 1996.Results, released Tuesday, show the Harford third-, fifth- and eighth-graders who took the Maryland State Performance Assessment Program tests in the spring of 1992 averaged higher scores than those for the state as a whole in reading, math, science and social studies.
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Sun Staff Writer | March 29, 1994
Howard County school officials are pleased with the latest county scores on a statewide test designed to measure how well students apply what they learn in the classroom.But they say there is room for improvement on the Maryland School Performance Assessment Program tests, particularly in the areas of social studies and reading.Among school districts statewide, the county's 7,500 third- , fifth- and eighth-graders ranked first in math, reading and science, according to 1993 test scores released by the county last week.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 11, 2000
LOUISVILLE, Neb. - The election Nov. 7 was one of the closest ever. Voters were evenly split. The outcome was still in question after Election Night. And history will praise two candidates for moving with grace and civility to reach a fair solution. The voters in Louisville (eastern Nebraskans call it LEWIS-ville) expected to know shortly after the polls closed who would represent them on the City Council. But Gregory Manley, who works for a sewer and paving contractor in Omaha, and Cletus Petrzilka, who was retired from the electric company, were in a race that was too close to call.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | November 30, 2000
Rebounding from a one-year slip, Maryland's public school pupils resumed their pattern of small but steady gains on the state's mandatory annual exams. But every school system in the state still fell significantly short of the statewide achievement goal long set for this year. Scores on the spring's battery of MSPAP tests rose in 19 of 24 school systems, though they slipped in two of the Baltimore area's six districts - Carroll and Harford counties. The 3-year-old reform effort in Baltimore City continued to show notable results, with pupils posting the sixth-largest increase in Maryland this year - marking an almost 50 percent gain since 1997 when a landmark city-state partnership began to pump tens of millions of extra dollars into the district.
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