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By Luke Broadwater | March 22, 2011
It's been revealed that the Obama administration named its war against Libya -- Operation Odyssey Dawn -- after a little-known album by English progressive rock band Yes.  But what hasn't been revealed are the names of other album titles seriously considered by Obama's inner circle during the build-up to the attack. Through our well-placed sources at the White House, we present to you the Top 10 Rejected "Operation Odyssey Dawn" Names.  Here we go:  10. C-Murder,  Operation The Truest S--- I Ever Said Why it was considered:  It sounded hard-core.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2014
If you are wondering how fallout from the Ray Rice elevator attack might affect the Ravens image, check out this "Saturday Night Live" skit depicting the team as criminals. The Carolina Panthers, the team the Ravens play Sunday, was satirized in the same way last night, as well as the NFL and CBS Sports Jim Nantz and Phil Simms for their handling of the scandal. It's disingenuous for SNL to be mocking CBS and not its own NBC Sports, which has the biggest NFL show on TV in "Sunday Night Football.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | January 23, 2003
Ben Jonson's 1609 farce, The Silent Woman, was among the playwright's greatest hits. Both John Dryden and Samuel Taylor Coleridge used the word "perfect" to describe this satire of Jacobean society. But American audiences are largely unfamiliar with the work, which is receiving its first-known professional American production at Washington's Shakespeare Theatre, where it is currently in previews. Under Michael Kahn's direction, Ted van Griethuysen stars as Morose, an aging, noise-phobic bachelor who marries Epicoene (Ricki Robichaux)
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | September 14, 2014
Dear Diary: Looks as though our folks must finally come clean on Benghazi. In my defense, the attack on our consulate occurred in the middle of my re-election campaign. Mitt Romney and the Republicans were banging me pretty good about foreign policy failures - particularly our new "leading from behind" strategy in dealing with the world's trouble spots. They seemed to forget I was elected on a platform to bring the boys and girls home, regardless of consequences! To make matters worse, Mr. Romney and his cowboy allies were alleging a retreat in the war on terror … er, our "overseas contingency operations.
NEWS
By John Goodspeed | July 10, 1995
THE CRAWLSPACE CONSPIRACY. By Thomas Keech. Baskerville Publishers. 328 pages. $22. WHAT! ANOTHER lawyer who thinks he can write fiction? Yes, but Thomas Keech, a Baltimorean and an assistant Maryland attorney general, can really do it. What's more, he doesn't write formula junk like murder mysteries. His first novel, "The Crawlspace Conspiracy," is satire, one of the most difficult literary forms to master. What's more, it's satire about politics and bureaucracy in the Queen City of the Patapsco Drainage Basin, a metropolis once called the Largest Unknown City in America, the Monumental City, where else but Baltimore, of which little satire has every been written and even less that's any good.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | October 5, 1994
Ah, the irony, the irony.The play at AXIS Theatre has a title unprintable in a family newspaper. The New York Times called it "a play by Mac Wellman" when it was produced off-Broadway, so this critic is going to call it "a play the New York Times called a play by Mac Wellman."The title is unprintable because it includes a slang term for a sex act. The irony of its unprintability is that the play itself is about knee-jerk reactions to sexually explicit art.Wellman wrote it as a satire of the controversy sparked by right-wing reaction to the exhibition of photographs by the late Robert Mapplethorpe, a controversy in which conservative North Carolina Senator Jesse Helms figured prominently.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | May 30, 1998
HOLLYWOOD'S efforts to deliberately rankle conservatives continue unabated. The latest attempt is Warren Beatty's "Bulworth," which opened nationwide earlier this month.The film has a number of things going for it. Beatty's movie -- he's the co-writer, director and star -- is screamingly funny. In some parts, it is brutally honest.Beatty plays California U.S. Sen. Jay Bulworth, who suddenly loses his mind and, during his re-election campaign, starts uttering truth instead of drivel. He tells a Jewish group that he includes all "the big Jews" on his speaking tours and includes an obligatory derogatory remark about Louis Farrakhan in his speeches.
FEATURES
By Faith Hayden and Faith Hayden,SUN STAFF | July 15, 2002
Kidnappings, shootouts, gun-brandishing women and a rogue hero all wrapped up in one convoluted plot: What more could an action-movie fan ask for? How about a dash of satire? Lethal Force, a 70-minute parody of B action movies, has all of this -- plus an onslaught of ketchup-like blood effects and a power drill scene that would make Tim "The Tool-Man" Allen cringe. "[Lethal Force] is about a guy whose son gets kidnapped, wife is murdered and is forced to betray his best friend," says Kristen Anchor, coordinator of Baltimore's Creative Alliance Movie Makers, which is presenting the film Friday at the Creative Alliance in Highlandtown.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | December 23, 1992
Dick Smothers, half of the Smothers Brothers duo that drov CBS censors batty in the '60s, says most of today's TV satire "is terribly insensitive."Shows such as NBC's "Saturday Night Live" and Fox's "In Living Color" "don't seem to care who they hit or who they hurt," says Mr. Smothers, whose left-wing, antiwar "Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour" was abruptly canceled after three seasons in 1969. "Our satire was more gentle, nudging. It wasn't coarse."In a move sure to attract baby boomers with political memories, reruns of the classic comedy-variety show will run weeknights at 8 on cable's E!
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | October 19, 2008
An agent so afraid of all his clients that his stomach rumbles like Vesuvius. A superstar hired for an action film who shows up looking bearded and burly, like Steve McQueen as Dr. Stockmann in An Enemy of the People. A cutting-edge director who banks his career on a bloody climax involving Sean Penn, three thugs and a dog. These elements of the terrific new comedy What Just Happened? have caused some reviewers to label it a satire and judge it by the standards of satire, weighing whether it's as stringent or cutting as it might be. Yet as anyone knows who's read Art Linson's source book of the same name (or his previous book, A Pound of Flesh)
NEWS
September 3, 2014
I read William Smith's letter again and again ( "Who needs lazy retirees?" Aug. 19). It was an incredibly good piece of satire. For those that didn't get it, the retirees who are leaving Maryland are not the lazy welfare addicts - those people stay here. Instead, the ones who are leaving are those of us who worked long and hard our entire lives, lived within our means and paid off our mortgages instead of continually refinancing to buy yet a nicer car or a bigger TV. We are the ones who saved enough money to retire without counting on Social Security.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
Standing in a pile of construction rubble on a cold and dirty location set at the Lord Baltimore Hotel here in January, I didn't know what to expect from Season 3 of HBO's "Veep. " Everyone in the cast and crew, including star Julia Louis-Dreyfus, seemed to be suffering from a chest-busting virus that was signaled by the most awful-sounding cough. Grim doesn't start to describe the mood as they prepped for the filming of a scene featuring a make-believe employment conference. Director Chris Addington suddenly found himself after a post-lunch conversation with Louis-Dreyfus confronted with the need for a serious rewrite of the scene he was about to shoot.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2013
If you don't think TV is in the midst of revolutionary change, go to Amazon.com this weekend and instead of buying a book or baby food, take a look at the online giant's original production of "Alpha House. " It's a political satire written and produced by "Doonesbury" creator Garry Trudeau starring John Goodman and Clark Johnson. It's set in a house on Capitol Hill that four Republican members of the U.S. Senate share, and the first three episodes can be streamed for free this week.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2013
"VEEP," the Baltimore-made political satire starring Julia Louis-Dreyfus, will start its second season April 14, HBO announced Monday. Here is the release from HBO:             The Emmy®-nominated comedy series VEEP kicks off its ten-episode second season SUNDAY, APRIL 14 (10:00-10:30 p.m. ET/PT), exclusively on HBO. Created by Armando Iannucci (Oscar® nominee for co-writing “In the Loop”), the show stars Emmy®-winner Julia Louis-Dreyfus as Selina Meyer, who becomes vice president, only to discover the job is nothing like she expected, but everything she was warned about.
NEWS
November 28, 2012
I'd like to thank The Sun for the wonderful satire on Sarah Palin's presidential prospects ("For president in 2016: Guess who?" Nov. 26). Some readers may have mistakenly assumed that op-ed contributor Charlotte Allen was seriously suggesting that the stunningly unqualified Ms. Palin would make a plausible presidential candidate in 2016. But the author's sly tongue-in-cheek and wink of the eye were everywhere evident to discerning readers. For example, the list of Ms. Palin's "qualifications" for the presidency included: (a)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | June 15, 2012
During the entire duration of my odd email exchange with "PASSIONGAMER4CHANGE," I was never completely sure whom I was talking to. If 60 percent of statistics are made up, then 40 percent of all Twitter accounts are owned by someone who is not who they portray themselves as. "PASSIONGAMER4CHANGE" is a character (probably), who masterfully satirizes what's going on in the video games world by portraying a disillusioned fanboy through Twitter (@RPGsbebroke) and Tumblr (rpgsbebroke.tumblr.com)
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN Jr | December 21, 1994
As a biographer of H. L. Mencken, I should know better than to perpetrate a hoax in a newspaper, but last Monday, in my column in the lower left-hand corner of the page opposite this one, I so perped, provoking confusion, suspicion, disbelief, outrage at the Smithsonian Institution, outrage at me and an appeal for a correction, which this is.In 1917 Mencken wrote a made-up ''history'' of the bathtub which asserted that Millard Fillmore installed the first...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Arthur Hirsch | March 24, 2002
From: Lionel C. Swift, President, Association of American Satirists To: The membership Re: Our obsolescence March 22, 2002 My dear fellow satirists: It is with difficulty and only after many hours of deliberation that I write to inform you that the board of directors and I have decided to cease organizational operations immediately. Recent events bring us to the inescapable conclusion that America no longer needs satire. The news is more than enough. Any attempts to lampoon by exaggeration would force us to rename the organization the Association of American Redundancy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2012
From a Sunday magazine cover piece to Page One stories and blogs posts, I feel like I have been writing about the new HBO satire "VEEP" for at least a year. But the series starring Julia Louis-Dreyfus  as Selina Meyer, a former senator who becomes vice president of the United States, doesn't debut until Sunday. I've been writing about it so much because this rich and daring series from Armando Iannucci is Maryland made. So, everyone knows what I think about "VEEP. " I love the performance by Louis-Dreyfus, who takes great risks and nails comedic nuances that most TV actors never get within shouting distance of intheir careers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2012
It's a cold, gray Friday afternoon in a dark and drafty concrete warehouse at an industrial park in Columbia. Not exactly the setting in which anyone would expect to find glamour, wit or the next big thing in pop culture. But through a series of doors built into a maze of temporary walls and stage flats, there's a group of a dozen tall director's chairs bearing Vice President of the United States seals set in two ragged rows along with a bank of TV monitors and warming lights. And in the center of the first row, sitting sideways in a black power suit coat and skirt, legs casually crossed, is Julia Louis-Dreyfus, star of HBO's new political satire "VEEP.
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