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By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | July 4, 2000
DirecTV users in Baltimore can now receive local television programming through the digital satellite service, but only if they spend around $300 on an upgraded system called DirecTV Plus. Both current and new users will have to purchase DirecTV Plus to receive local network channels, which include WMAR (ABC), WJZ (CBS), WBAL (NBC), WBFF (Fox) and PBS' national feed. The local channel package will also cost users $5.99 per month. "Certainly the customers who own a DirecTV system now will continue to receive the full slate of our programming," Robert Mercer, senior manager of communications at DirecTV, said yesterday.
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NEWS
February 14, 2013
In response to Michael Dresser 's recent front page article ("Death row: Should they die for their crimes?," Feb. 10) it shows just how desperate, devious, disillusioned, and devoted The Sun, liberal journalists like Mr. Dresser and the rest of the Gov. Martin O'Malley-loving, liberal left-wing, drive-by media are when it comes to protecting, pacifying and proficiently making these murdering scum of the earth animals out to be "human" just like...
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BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 24, 2002
WASHINGTON - Staff members of the Justice Department have recommended that the government block the proposed $11.2 billion merger of the two largest satellite television broadcasters, DirecTV and EchoStar, because it would be anti-competitive, lawyers involved in the review said yesterday. If approved by Charles A. James, head of the Antitrust Division, the decision to block the merger will be a major victory for Rupert Murdoch, chairman of News Corp., who had sought unsuccessfully to buy DirecTV.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes | gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | March 31, 2010
Baltimore-based SpotCrime.com already uses the Web to deliver up-to-the-minute crime maps for communities across the United States. The company's next medium? Satellite television. The startup company said this week that it struck a deal with DirecTV to feature a SpotCrime application that the satellite service's customers can access now through their television sets. SpotCrime is one of a handful of companies in the United States that makes crime data available for free on Web-based maps.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | October 30, 2001
In a deal that experts said will face tough scrutiny from regulators, EchoStar Communications Corp. agreed yesterday to buy General Motors Corp. subsidiary Hughes Electronics for more than $30 billion. The deal would create a satellite television giant with more than 16.7 million subscribers, if it goes through. But that's a big if. "The regulatory hurdles are high, and it's not a done deal until the [Federal Trade Commission] and the [Federal Communications Commission] sign off on it," said Adi Kishore, an analyst with Yankee Group in Boston.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | March 28, 1999
Tracked down by a detective for a satellite television service, a Michigan salesman was arrested yesterday at an amateur radio and computer show in Timonium on charges of selling equipment that could steal the signals -- and programming -- beamed down from space.Authorities said the salesman was offering electronic equipment designed to pick up digital satellite signals -- including pay-per-view movies -- from the company DirecTV.The arrest of Michael Paul Smeltzer resulted from a national search by the company's sleuth, James Wells of El Segundo, Calif.
NEWS
February 14, 2013
In response to Michael Dresser 's recent front page article ("Death row: Should they die for their crimes?," Feb. 10) it shows just how desperate, devious, disillusioned, and devoted The Sun, liberal journalists like Mr. Dresser and the rest of the Gov. Martin O'Malley-loving, liberal left-wing, drive-by media are when it comes to protecting, pacifying and proficiently making these murdering scum of the earth animals out to be "human" just like...
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 26, 2003
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Mohammed al Khayat used to gaze longingly at the satellite dishes on Saddam Hussein's palaces. Now he has his own dish to admire. This week, the 32-year-old money changer paid $500 cash, an enormous sum for most Iraqis, for a satellite receiver and the biggest dish he could find - a piece of green concave metal 6 feet across. "I want to watch all of the world, all channels in the world," he said, searching for the right words to capture his expansive mood. "I want to watch freedom."
BUSINESS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 30, 2003
Two years ago, DirecTV officials, backed by law enforcement officers, swooped into three warehouses in California and seized shipping records and credit-card receipts of people who bought electronic equipment commonly used to steal the beams of satellite television. The nation's leading satellite television provider, DirecTV Inc., has used those records to file thousands of piracy lawsuits across the country, including recently in federal court in Chicago. "Clearly, we're sending a message to consumers," said spokesman Robert Mercer.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | October 8, 2005
After years of fighting it, I got wired this week to the modern world. I climbed up on the roof and watched a guy attach a satellite dish to the chimney. As I watched the installer point the dish toward a satellite in the distant southwestern sky, it struck me that this device was not only going to play a role in how we spend our weekends, it also represented a seismic shift in household philosophy. For a quarter of a century, ours was a low-tech television home. If a program couldn't be pulled in by our rooftop antenna, we didn't see it. I resisted cable, or any form of pay television.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | October 8, 2005
After years of fighting it, I got wired this week to the modern world. I climbed up on the roof and watched a guy attach a satellite dish to the chimney. As I watched the installer point the dish toward a satellite in the distant southwestern sky, it struck me that this device was not only going to play a role in how we spend our weekends, it also represented a seismic shift in household philosophy. For a quarter of a century, ours was a low-tech television home. If a program couldn't be pulled in by our rooftop antenna, we didn't see it. I resisted cable, or any form of pay television.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rasheim T. Freeman and Rasheim T. Freeman,SUN STAFF | December 9, 2004
Kenny Day, Tailgaters are investing in technology to spice up their parking-lot parties, impress their friends and take advantage of modern conveniences. Along with elaborate spreads of food and drink, fans are carting expensive grills, gas-powered blenders, flat-screen televisions and satellite dishes to stadium parking lots. And the technology industry is doing its best to capitalize on the interest. Companies like Rhode Island-based KVH Industries Inc. sell a satellite system for tailgaters who want to stay connected with sports, news and movie channels.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 3, 2004
EL SEGUNDO, Calif. - DirecTV Group Inc., the biggest U.S. satellite-television provider, agreed yesterday to buy former marketing partner Pegasus Communications Corp.'s satellite-TV unit for $938 million to sell service directly to 8.4 million rural homes. DirecTV will pay $875 million in cash, the El Segundo, Calif.,-based company said in a statement. Pegasus previously held exclusive rights to provide DirecTV's service in rural areas of 41 U.S. states, sharing revenue with DirecTV. The number of subscribers to DirecTV services in rural areas has steadily declined in the past few years, and this deal will allow DirecTV to reverse that trend and increase its subscriber base in these areas, an analyst said.
BUSINESS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 28, 2003
For two decades, Rupert Murdoch has been building up his empire by tearing down the status quo. When many in Britain thought it foolhardy to challenge the state-owned BBC, Murdoch ignored them and launched the first pay-TV service in the United Kingdom, eventually turning it into a roaring success. Then, as media barons in the United States shied from trying to undo the 30-year stranglehold of the three broadcast networks - ABC, NBC and CBS - Murdoch's News Corp. established Fox as a viable alternative.
BUSINESS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 30, 2003
Two years ago, DirecTV officials, backed by law enforcement officers, swooped into three warehouses in California and seized shipping records and credit-card receipts of people who bought electronic equipment commonly used to steal the beams of satellite television. The nation's leading satellite television provider, DirecTV Inc., has used those records to file thousands of piracy lawsuits across the country, including recently in federal court in Chicago. "Clearly, we're sending a message to consumers," said spokesman Robert Mercer.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 26, 2003
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Mohammed al Khayat used to gaze longingly at the satellite dishes on Saddam Hussein's palaces. Now he has his own dish to admire. This week, the 32-year-old money changer paid $500 cash, an enormous sum for most Iraqis, for a satellite receiver and the biggest dish he could find - a piece of green concave metal 6 feet across. "I want to watch all of the world, all channels in the world," he said, searching for the right words to capture his expansive mood. "I want to watch freedom."
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes | gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | March 31, 2010
Baltimore-based SpotCrime.com already uses the Web to deliver up-to-the-minute crime maps for communities across the United States. The company's next medium? Satellite television. The startup company said this week that it struck a deal with DirecTV to feature a SpotCrime application that the satellite service's customers can access now through their television sets. SpotCrime is one of a handful of companies in the United States that makes crime data available for free on Web-based maps.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 3, 2004
EL SEGUNDO, Calif. - DirecTV Group Inc., the biggest U.S. satellite-television provider, agreed yesterday to buy former marketing partner Pegasus Communications Corp.'s satellite-TV unit for $938 million to sell service directly to 8.4 million rural homes. DirecTV will pay $875 million in cash, the El Segundo, Calif.,-based company said in a statement. Pegasus previously held exclusive rights to provide DirecTV's service in rural areas of 41 U.S. states, sharing revenue with DirecTV. The number of subscribers to DirecTV services in rural areas has steadily declined in the past few years, and this deal will allow DirecTV to reverse that trend and increase its subscriber base in these areas, an analyst said.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 24, 2002
WASHINGTON - Staff members of the Justice Department have recommended that the government block the proposed $11.2 billion merger of the two largest satellite television broadcasters, DirecTV and EchoStar, because it would be anti-competitive, lawyers involved in the review said yesterday. If approved by Charles A. James, head of the Antitrust Division, the decision to block the merger will be a major victory for Rupert Murdoch, chairman of News Corp., who had sought unsuccessfully to buy DirecTV.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 24, 2002
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - Passengers on JetBlue Airways get an odd gift at the end of each flight: the flimsy but efficient enough headphones they used on the trip. Flight attendants call the stereo headsets a "souvenir." A company representative (OK, a flight attendant) explains that discarding headphones after a single use and buying new ones is cheaper than cleaning the blue foam earpieces. Cutting costs and thinking outside the box are what JetBlue wants to be all about. It's been called the most successful airline start-up in a generation.
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