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BUSINESS
March 13, 1996
Hughes Network Systems said yesterday that it has introduced a new line of home satellite systems, becoming the third company to sell the equipment needed to receive signals from the increasingly popular DirecTV and USSB direct broadcast satellite television services.The Germantown-based unit of Hughes Electronics Corp. joins RCA and Sony as authorized providers of the 18-inch satellite dishes and related equipment. Hughes Electronics also is the parent company of DirecTV.Hughes said its Insight DSS system will offer more than 200 channels of digital audio and video programming.
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2010
GREENBELT — NASA unveiled a new satellite-based system on Monday that space agency officials say should reduce the time needed to locate lost boaters and hikers to just seconds. "Our mission is to take the "search" out of search-and-rescue technology," said Dave Affens, the search and rescue mission manager at NASA, an agency sometimes criticized for not focusing enough on Earth-bound problems. "Our ultimate goal here is to save lives," Affens said. Designed and developed at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, DASS — the Distress Alerting Satellite System — will be able to locate emergency beacons carried by aircraft, boats and hikers almost instantaneously, officials said.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 12, 2004
WASHINGTON - A highly classified intelligence program that the Senate Intelligence Committee has tried unsuccessfully to kill is a new $9.5 billion spy satellite system that could take photographs only in daylight hours and in clear weather, current and former government officials say. The cost of the system, now the single biggest item in the intelligence budget, and doubts about its usefulness have spurred a secret congressional battle, which first...
NEWS
By JULIE SCHARPER and JULIE SCHARPER,SUN REPORTER | July 15, 2006
Maryland lottery players can expect faster, more reliable games - even in thunderstorms - thanks to a new satellite system connected this week, Lottery officials said yesterday. But retailers didn't feel as if they had hit the jackpot earlier in the week, when their terminals unexpectedly crashed and stayed down for hours. The problems seemed to have been fixed by the end of the week. "It's been very awful," said Michele Denisio, owner of the Bird River Inn in Middle River. "The games freezing up, not having access to them for the whole day."
NEWS
By JULIE SCHARPER and JULIE SCHARPER,SUN REPORTER | July 15, 2006
Maryland lottery players can expect faster, more reliable games - even in thunderstorms - thanks to a new satellite system connected this week, Lottery officials said yesterday. But retailers didn't feel as if they had hit the jackpot earlier in the week, when their terminals unexpectedly crashed and stayed down for hours. The problems seemed to have been fixed by the end of the week. "It's been very awful," said Michele Denisio, owner of the Bird River Inn in Middle River. "The games freezing up, not having access to them for the whole day."
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | December 21, 1990
WASHINGTON -- The launching of three medium-range Iraqi missiles in what turned out to be a test caught American intelligence agencies so completely by surprise early this month that some U.S. officials feared war was about to erupt in the Persian Gulf.America's sophisticated satellite system failed to detect anything until the first missile had been in flight for six minutes and was only one minute from impact.Officials previously had believed that Iraq could not carry out the several hours of fueling and other prelaunch preparations needed for such missile firings without detection by U.S. satellites and other sensors -- ostensibly in time for an American counterstrike before the Iraqi weapons could lift off.In the test, however, the Iraqis completed all the preparations and even the first launch without being discovered.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | February 25, 1997
NEW YORK -- Loral Space & Communications Ltd. agreed yesterday to buy out its European partners in Space Systems/Loral for $374 million, part of Chairman Bernard Schwartz's vision to create a global satellite communications company.Loral will buy the remaining 49 percent of Space Systems/Loral from Aerospatiale, Alcatel Espace, Alenia Spazio SpA and Daimler-Benz Aerospace AG for cash and Loral stock. The companies will receive a combined stake in Loral Space & Communications of about 6 percent.
BUSINESS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | November 9, 1996
Lockheed Martin Corp. won a $1.8 billion defense contract yesterday to build the next generation of the satellite system that would warn the nation of enemy missile attacks.If the Pentagon decides to launch 12 to 15 more satellites in addition to the five purchased yesterday, the contract could be worth between $10 billion and $22 billion for the Bethesda-based company, analysts said."This is a big win for them. It really solidifies their role as the dominant provider of military space products," said defense analyst Brett Lambert of DFI International in Washington.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | June 18, 1997
SCHAUMBURG, Ill. -- Motorola Inc., moving to dominate the satellite communications market, plans to build a $12.9 billion global network to provide voice, data and video communications to phone companies, businesses and telecommuters.Motorola's venture, called Celestri, is a bold competitive stroke by the world's largest maker of cellular phones and pagers, analysts said. The plan dwarfs those of Tel-edesic Corp. and a joint venture of France's Alcatel-Alsthom SA and Loral Space & Communications Ltd. of the United States.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | May 21, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The Westinghouse Electronic Systems Group in Linthicum moved into the satellite communications business yesterday when it won an $80 million contract to build phones and the ground station for a mobile communications system to serve all of North America.The contract was awarded to the local systems group, primarily a defense contractor, by American Mobile Satellite Corp.Washington-based American Mobile also announced the selection of General Dynamics Corp. to launch the first of three planned satellites for the communications project in the fourth quarter of 1994, when the service will begin.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 12, 2004
WASHINGTON - A highly classified intelligence program that the Senate Intelligence Committee has tried unsuccessfully to kill is a new $9.5 billion spy satellite system that could take photographs only in daylight hours and in clear weather, current and former government officials say. The cost of the system, now the single biggest item in the intelligence budget, and doubts about its usefulness have spurred a secret congressional battle, which first...
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | January 13, 2002
The guys at Integral Systems Inc. had a great idea. Instead of controlling satellites with bulky mainframes and mini-computers, like everyone else, they'd fly them with desktop computers. And instead of building custom-made systems each time a bird went into orbit - like everyone else - they'd make one generic system that could fly satellites from any manufacturer, in any orbit, on any mission. Anything. Their control system would be easier to use, cheaper by a factor of 10, and people with satellites would be crazy to buy anything else.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | July 24, 2000
Wheeling through the streets of Baltimore late at night, it's easy to wind up in a con frontation you don't want. Furry critters dash across the road, freeze in the sudden glare of your headlights, and then skitter off in the wrong direction. We're talking about rabbits, which have come to grief in my path more than once during the past few years, despite my efforts to avoid them. In the suburbs, the game is larger and the consequences more serious: deer, joggers, cars and dark roads don't mix. But if you're driving a Cadillac DeVille DTS, you have a much better chance of avoiding disaster.
NEWS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | August 27, 1999
Russia apparently cannot afford to launch several new satellites for monitoring U.S. nuclear missile strikes, so the Congressional Budget Office has explored a truly strange gesture of post-Cold War goodwill:Have the United States pay to put six of the satellites in orbit -- "enough to give Russia 24-hour coverage of U.S. missile fields," according to a CBO letter obtained by The Sun.The Aug. 24 letter to Senate Minority Leader Tom Daschle, a South Dakota...
BUSINESS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | August 25, 1999
Northrop Grumman Corp.'s Electronic Sensors & Systems Sector in Linthicum is racking up a healthy piece of business in the nation's controversial effort to create a space-based shield against ballistic missile attacks.The former Westinghouse plant near Baltimore-Washington International Airport has won a $134 million share of a contract to plan a network of missile-tracking satellites.Combined with work the company is already doing on another, related satellite system, ESSS is in position to dominate a key portion of national missile defense: building the infrared "eyes" that detect incoming attacks.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | June 18, 1997
SCHAUMBURG, Ill. -- Motorola Inc., moving to dominate the satellite communications market, plans to build a $12.9 billion global network to provide voice, data and video communications to phone companies, businesses and telecommuters.Motorola's venture, called Celestri, is a bold competitive stroke by the world's largest maker of cellular phones and pagers, analysts said. The plan dwarfs those of Tel-edesic Corp. and a joint venture of France's Alcatel-Alsthom SA and Loral Space & Communications Ltd. of the United States.
BUSINESS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | August 25, 1999
Northrop Grumman Corp.'s Electronic Sensors & Systems Sector in Linthicum is racking up a healthy piece of business in the nation's controversial effort to create a space-based shield against ballistic missile attacks.The former Westinghouse plant near Baltimore-Washington International Airport has won a $134 million share of a contract to plan a network of missile-tracking satellites.Combined with work the company is already doing on another, related satellite system, ESSS is in position to dominate a key portion of national missile defense: building the infrared "eyes" that detect incoming attacks.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | May 21, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The Westinghouse Electronic Systems Group in Linthicum moved into the satellite communications business yesterday when it won an $80 million contract to build phones and the ground station for a mobile communications system to serve all of North America.The contract was awarded to the local systems group, primarily a defense contractor, by American Mobile Satellite Corp.Washington-based American Mobile also announced the selection of General Dynamics Corp. to launch the first of three planned satellites for the communications project in the fourth quarter of 1994, when the service will begin.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | June 9, 1997
Finally, they had liftoff.After four months of delays, a McDonnell Douglas Delta II rocket roared upward from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California on May 5, carrying five commercial satellites and dreams of a new era in communications.The 1,500-pound satellites are the first of 66 scheduled to be flung into orbit to create a man-made constellation called the Iridium satellite network. Its ambitious goal: to make wireless telephone calls available from any spot on the globe with a small, hand-held phone.
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