Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSatellite Radio
IN THE NEWS

Satellite Radio

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Ellen B. Cutler | July 14, 2010
It happens to me over and over and over again: I am listening to something intently on NPR: news analysis, perhaps, some point being made on a talk program or a hilarious exchange on "Wait, Wait, Don't Tell Me." Suddenly, rap blares from my speakers, or maybe the exhortations of a fire-and-brimstone preacher, or the expletives of a show host taking advantage of the non-existent decency standards in satellite radio. Can nothing be done about the intrusion of satellite broadcasts into my favorite public radio programs?
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | January 20, 2012
Judging by free safety Ed Reed's comments to SiriusXM satellite radio on Monday, Joe Flacco may have yet to win over some of his teammates. But that's not the case with Vince Wilfork. The New England Patriots nose tackle said Thursday during a national conference call that he respects the Ravens quarterback, who has been the subject of much debate this week after he threw for less than 200 yards and was sacked five times in Sunday's 20-13 victory over the Houston Texans in Sunday's AFC divisional round.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Gregory Karp and Gregory Karp,The Morning Call | August 3, 2008
Common targets for family spending cuts include work lunches out, premium cable TV channels and the perennial whipping boy of financial advice, a daily latte. But what if you subscribe to satellite radio? Does paying for radio present a good value proposition for you? Satellite radio, most often found in automobiles using special receivers and antennas, is similar to subscription satellite TV. Though new packages and pricing are supposed to be available in the fall, customers have commonly paid about $13 a month to receive service.
EXPLORE
November 14, 2011
About nine months into a regular commuting routine, and I've become familiar with what the radio traffic reporters call the "usual slow spots. " The main one for me, as it is for many folks reading this, is on I-95 from roughly White Marsh (but sometimes from as far up as Route 152) down to the 895 split. Daily I'll take in the traffic reports from the various stations programmed into the buttons on my car radio. Invariably, if the traffic scene in the greater Baltimore area is pretty fluid, the report is basic and includes some bad news for me and my brother and sister I-95 commuters: things are pretty clear except around the "usual slow spots.
ENTERTAINMENT
By KEVIN WASHINGTON | September 11, 2003
Having to shell out between $300 and $600 to enjoy satellite radio in my car was a daunting proposition last year when the two satellite radio networks made their debut. Since then, however, XM Satellite Radio has partnered with an electronics manufacturer to offer an alternative, Delphi's SKYFi XM Satellite Radio receiver ($130) and several accessories that make it usable in your home, car or anywhere you can catch a signal. You must buy each accessory to make this work. I tested the Delphi SKYFi Audio System ($100)
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Stephen Kiehl and Tricia Bishop and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | October 7, 2004
Shock jock Howard Stern, who has earned a living - and the wrath of the FCC - with his foul mouth and sexual humor, is taking his act from the commercial airwaves to satellite radio. There, the government won't be able to regulate what he says, but his listeners will have to pay to hear it. In a deal announced yesterday, and valued at $500 million over five years, Stern will broadcast exclusively on Sirius Satellite Radio, which charges subscribers to listen to its 120 channels. Off the public airwaves, Stern will be freed from regulation by the Federal Communications Commission, which has repeatedly found his show indecent and has fined radio stations for airing it. "I'm done with this kind of radio," Stern said on the air yesterday in announcing his decision.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | July 11, 2002
It's coming from outer space, and it's going to take over your car radio. At least, that's the plan of two companies who are vying for one of the hottest new broadcasting developments since a guy named Guglielmo Marconi figured out a way to wirelessly send telegraph signals. It's called satellite radio, and if you think it's complicated, it isn't -- the bottom line is it's a great new option for listening to radio on the road. The two companies offering satellite radio service, XM and Sirius, each offer more than 100 channels of music, talk, sports and news radio stations that are beamed via upper-atmosphere orbiters into your car (or even your home, for that matter)
BUSINESS
By CHARLES DUHIGG and CHARLES DUHIGG,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 17, 2006
The orbit of XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc. wobbled yesterday as the nation's largest pay-radio service said its fourth-quarter and annual losses widened and a company director quit after warning of an impending crisis. Shares fell 5 percent as investors learned of concerns raised by former XM director Pierce Roberts Jr. that the company may be spending too much to attract subscribers in its rivalry with Sirius Satellite Radio Inc. Revenue more than doubled to $177 million and the company signed up more than 2.7 million new subscribers, bringing its total to more than 6 million.
NEWS
By NICK MADIGAN | August 26, 2007
With all these new gadgets for listening to music -- from MP3s to state-of-the-art cell phones and laptops, not to mention satellite radio -- it's a wonder anyone is listening to good old-fashioned terrestrial radio. One theory says that so many listeners are spending money on newfangled technology that the ones left tuning in to terrestrial radio are doing so only because they can't afford the new toys. "Because of satellite radio, more affluent people are going to use that service, so we have a smaller piece of the pie to slice up with the people remaining, who are not so affluent," said Bob Pettit, general manager of WCBM, the Baltimore talk-radio station at 680 AM. "The younger people are going to the new technologies.
NEWS
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE and FRANK D. ROYLANCE,SUN REPORTER | April 28, 2006
Startled fans of National Public Radio stations and Christian broadcasts at the low end of the FM dial are complaining that satellite shock-jock Howard Stern has burst in on their morning drive-time listening. "Usually they're upset, because they don't know what's going on. This isn't what they tuned in to [hear]," said Charles W. Loughery, president of the Word FM Radio Network, a group of "contemporary Christian" stations in eastern Pennsylvania. Normal car radios can't pick up signals from satellite-based subscription services such as Sirius, which carries Howard Stern's show.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2010
A 45-year-old man has been charged with stealing a satellite radio from the vehicle of Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's husband last week, police said. The radio was stolen from Kent Blake's vehicle, which was apparently unlocked and parked out of view of the mayor's executive protection detail in the Coldspring neighborhood of North Baltimore. But police said cameras captured an image of the suspect, and officers located him in the neighborhood over the weekend and took him in for questioning.
NEWS
By Ellen B. Cutler | July 14, 2010
It happens to me over and over and over again: I am listening to something intently on NPR: news analysis, perhaps, some point being made on a talk program or a hilarious exchange on "Wait, Wait, Don't Tell Me." Suddenly, rap blares from my speakers, or maybe the exhortations of a fire-and-brimstone preacher, or the expletives of a show host taking advantage of the non-existent decency standards in satellite radio. Can nothing be done about the intrusion of satellite broadcasts into my favorite public radio programs?
BUSINESS
By Gregory Karp and Gregory Karp,The Morning Call | August 3, 2008
Common targets for family spending cuts include work lunches out, premium cable TV channels and the perennial whipping boy of financial advice, a daily latte. But what if you subscribe to satellite radio? Does paying for radio present a good value proposition for you? Satellite radio, most often found in automobiles using special receivers and antennas, is similar to subscription satellite TV. Though new packages and pricing are supposed to be available in the fall, customers have commonly paid about $13 a month to receive service.
BUSINESS
By Jim Puzzanghera and Jim Puzzanghera,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 24, 2008
WASHINGTON - Federal regulators appeared poised yesterday to give final approval to the merger of the nation's only two satellite radio operators, which would bring together the struggling companies after a 17-month quest. Deborah Taylor Tate, a Republican who held the swing vote on the five-member Federal Communications Commission, reportedly was ready to vote in favor of the $3.9 billion merger if Sirius Satellite Radio Inc. and XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc. agreed to new conditions.
BUSINESS
December 1, 2007
XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc. Shares rose $1.86, or 14 percent, to $15.60 yesterday after Bear Stearns & Co. said the Department of Justice may approve XM's merger with rival Sirius Satellite Radio Inc.
BUSINESS
By This column was compiled from dispatches by the Associated and Bloomberg News | October 5, 2007
Nation : Earnings Sealy profit declines 27% Sealy Corp. said third-quarter profit fell 27 percent. Net income declined to $21.5 million, or 22 cents a share, from $29.4 million, or 30 cents a share, a year earlier, the company said yesterday. Acquisitions Bain-3Com deal due security review Bain Capital Partners will submit for a national security review its planned $2.2 billion buyout of network equipment maker 3Com Corp. to address concerns about a Chinese telecommunications company's minority stake.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | September 24, 2001
More than 22,000 miles from Earth, two satellites named "Rock" and "Roll" are getting ready to rock 'n roll. The two aptly named orbiters are set to begin bathing North America in waves of digital music in the long-anticipated launch of satellite radio. So what makes these different from the 12,000 radio stations that already service the country? Think of it this way: with a satellite radio you can drive from Baltimore to Los Angeles and never be out of range of near-commercial-free tunes that match your tastes.
BUSINESS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 21, 2001
The biggest development in radio since the popularization of the FM band will begin next month, putting to the test a multibillion-dollar bet that millions of consumers will gladly spend $9.95 a month to hear what they want when they want to hear it without a barrage of commercials. After years of anticipation and long technical delays, satellite radio will make its debut. Its proponents hope to build an in-the-car radio business on the same sort of consumer demands and frustrations that have made cable television a potent competitor to broadcast TV. Sirius Satellite Radio Inc. of New York is beginning quality tests this month, broadcasting 100 channels of music, entertainment, sports and news, 50 of them commercial-free.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.