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By New York Times News Service | November 11, 1990
Now the satellite dish, an eyesore on the suburban and rural landscape, can perch on a lawn disguised as a patio umbrella and table.Called Under Cover, the dish provides shade in the summer.Even in the winter, as incongruous as it may look outdoors, its synthetic covering protects the dish from snow while allowing signals to pass through.Under Cover was originally designed for residents of Palm Springs, Calif.The resort town had more than 90 country clubs but no satellite dishes until 1987, when Ron Roberge began selling the special dish.
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NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 26, 2003
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Mohammed al Khayat used to gaze longingly at the satellite dishes on Saddam Hussein's palaces. Now he has his own dish to admire. This week, the 32-year-old money changer paid $500 cash, an enormous sum for most Iraqis, for a satellite receiver and the biggest dish he could find - a piece of green concave metal 6 feet across. "I want to watch all of the world, all channels in the world," he said, searching for the right words to capture his expansive mood. "I want to watch freedom."
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NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,Staff Writer | April 17, 1992
A Baltimore Circuit Court judge has upheld a city zoning board decision that denied a Northeast Baltimore man's request to install a satellite dish in his back yard.Judge Robert I. H. Hammerman said yesterday the zoning board was within its authority to deny Donald F. Esslinger's request for a conditional-use permit to erect the television satellite dish because of aesthetics. The judge ruled in the case on Wednesday.Last summer the zoning board denied Mr. Esslinger's request for a permit -- his third request in six years.
FEATURES
By Dana Hull and Dana Hull,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 24, 2003
SAN JOSE, Calif. - One television monitor shows CNN with its "Showdown Iraq" logo. On another, an anchor on Lebanon's Al-Manar TV, a privately owned station controlled by the fundamentalist movement Hezbollah, talks about diplomatic wrangling at the United Nations. On a third screen, a Baghdad correspondent from the United Arab Emirates' Abu Dhabi TV gives a live report. They're all playing on a bank of monitors at WorldLink TV, a nonprofit network based in San Francisco that makes news broadcasts from the Arab world and Israel available to satellite TV subscribers in the United States.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | March 7, 1995
If you have a satellite TV dish, Bell Atlantic Corp. wants you to pay a tax on the programs you receive.The regional telephone company has written legislation, recently introduced in the General Assembly, that would let Maryland's counties and municipalities impose a 5 percent excise tax on any subscription-based video programming that competes with cable television.In the near future one of the providers of such programming will presumably be Bell Atlantic, which says it is proposing to voluntarily accept a tax on itself for the good of the community.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 20, 1995
TEHRAN, Iran -- After surviving U.S. economic sanctions, eight years of war with Iraq and international condemnation for its extremism, Iran's Islamic regime is confronting a challenge potentially greater than all others combined: the satellite dish.After all, it pits the "mullahcracy" against "Oprah" and "L.A. Law.""This is one battle the regime has no hope of winning," said a middle-aged woman addicted to mornings with "Oprah," afternoons with "Santa Barbara" and evenings with "Baywatch."
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Staff Writer | February 25, 1992
Inside their Lutherville bungalow, Tim and Carol Ann Frost might be watching, at any given time, a Spanish talk show, the Winter Olympics -- in French -- or a debate in the British House of Commons.The Frosts own a satellite dish -- a $4,000 electronic device that enables them to get nearly 250 television and radio channels from around the world. The 12-foot-high and 10-foot-wide dish has also gotten them into hot water with Baltimore County zoning officials.The satellite dish currently is on the side and slightly to the back of the Frosts' home.
NEWS
By Dan Morse and Dan Morse,SUN STAFF | January 2, 1997
The planned community of Columbia -- long-known for its strict architectural rules governing everything from fence heights swing-set colors -- has begun allowing residents to place satellite dishes on their roofs.Under a new federal telecommunications law that gives homeowners greater control over their dishes, more than 40 Columbia residents have been allowed to install the small receivers during the past several months. Dish salesmen predict many more will be installed.The trend is troubling to some officials at the Columbia Association, the homeowners association that manages the 84,000-person planned community.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff Writer | September 30, 1992
WESTMINSTER -- James Crabbs of Uniontown Road doesn't like satellite TV dishes, and he supports a ban on adding new ones to roofs or yards in The Greens of Westminster."
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Staff writer | May 5, 1991
Ten years ago, Harry Putnam installed satellite dishes at his Ellicott City home on College Avenue in the town's historic district.Last week, a district court judge ordered Putnam to remove them within 30 days for failing to obtain approval from the county's Historic District Commission.The commission says the dishes are not compatible with the "architectural and historical integrity of the community."But Putnam doesn't understand the commission's delay."If they were going to enforce (the law)
BUSINESS
October 27, 2002
Dear Mr. Azrael: I live in a rowhouse with a slate roof. Recently, my neighbor climbed up on my roof and installed a satellite dish on my chimney when I was at work. I asked my neighbor to remove it, and he said he would. After two weeks of waiting, I asked again. My neighbor said it was a "shared" chimney. Can you help me solve this problem? Katherine Yarlott Baltimore Dear Ms. Yarlott: The property description in your deed should make clear whether the chimney is "shared." In general, each owner of neighboring rowhouses owns to the center of the partition wall between the two properties, and shares the use of the wall in common.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 21, 2001
KABUL, Afghanistan - For five years, Mohammad Yaseem worked like a spy, traveling by night on secret missions, the tools of his trade buried deep in his pockets. Once, when an informant betrayed him, he escaped the authorities only by fleeing across a rooftop. "I was very afraid," he says. "It was six months in jail if they caught me." Yaseem is a TV repairman, a job officially forbidden by the Taliban. Now he's back on the day shift and breathing easy, and in the week since the Taliban left town he has repaired more televisions and videocassette recorders than during 20 months of the bad old days.
NEWS
By Laura Dreibelbis and Laura Dreibelbis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 6, 2000
Hurricane Floyd has returned to Ellicott City - this time in the form of a satellite image, visible on a computer screen. The storm moves up the East Coast as it did last year, churning in a counterclockwise motion. It's like a television weather broadcast except Floyd appears on computer screens at Centennial High School. Kyle Smith and Mark Perdomo are studying Floyd's existence Sept. 15-17, 1999, and noting its movement patterns and impact on the area. Mark likes space and satellites.
SPORTS
December 28, 1998
NBA games lost yesterday: 3.Total games missed: 376.Earliest estimated date season can start: Feb. 1.Projected player salary losses (through Feb. 1): $535 million.Negotiations: Five hours of talks yesterday failed to produce an accord. No further talks are scheduled.Today's best canceled game: Toronto at L.A. Clippers. The real NBA die-hards either show up at the Sports Arena or tune their satellite dishes to this gem.Pub Date: 12/28/98
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | March 8, 1998
Bell Atlantic Corp. is looking to the sky for its latest television venture.In forging a marketing alliance with DirecTV Inc. and United States Satellite Broadcasting, the Northeast's dominant telephone provider is betting that direct broadcast satellite technology, or DBS, will continue to pluck off unhappy cable customers -- especially when it becomes as easy to get as calling the local phone company.Since first appearing in the early 1990s, DBS dishes -- typically the size of a large pizza -- have proliferated with astonishing speed.
BUSINESS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | April 27, 1997
Area homeowner associations are scrambling to protect scenic views in their neighborhoods now that the FCC has sent a clear signal that homeowners have a right to install television antennas and small satellite dishes on their properties."
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 26, 2003
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Mohammed al Khayat used to gaze longingly at the satellite dishes on Saddam Hussein's palaces. Now he has his own dish to admire. This week, the 32-year-old money changer paid $500 cash, an enormous sum for most Iraqis, for a satellite receiver and the biggest dish he could find - a piece of green concave metal 6 feet across. "I want to watch all of the world, all channels in the world," he said, searching for the right words to capture his expansive mood. "I want to watch freedom."
BUSINESS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | April 27, 1997
Area homeowner associations are scrambling to protect scenic views in their neighborhoods now that the FCC has sent a clear signal that homeowners have a right to install television antennas and small satellite dishes on their properties."
NEWS
January 7, 1997
AN OUTSIDER might say that Columbia's landmark is the lack of one. Its relative uniformity results from a disdain of signs and markers that distinguish the places hidden by foliage or buried in cul-de-sacs. So it was no small matter recently when the planned community began allowing residents to mount small satellite dishes on their roofs.The Columbia Association, which has taken some residents to court for failing to paint their metallic chimneys, does not welcome this. The association spent $20,000 to battle a Long Reach resident over a satellite dish before settling the case about two years ago. It ordered another Columbia resident to plant trees to hide a dish.
NEWS
By Dan Morse and Dan Morse,SUN STAFF | January 2, 1997
The planned community of Columbia -- long-known for its strict architectural rules governing everything from fence heights swing-set colors -- has begun allowing residents to place satellite dishes on their roofs.Under a new federal telecommunications law that gives homeowners greater control over their dishes, more than 40 Columbia residents have been allowed to install the small receivers during the past several months. Dish salesmen predict many more will be installed.The trend is troubling to some officials at the Columbia Association, the homeowners association that manages the 84,000-person planned community.
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