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By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2014
Satellite images of the storm that caused historic flooding in Baltimore and other parts of the Northeast show a system massive enough to rival some tropical storms that have hit the region. The image above was taken Tuesday from several orbits of the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership, or Suomi NPP, a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration satellite. See the original here , along with other NOAA satellite images. The system stretched from the Great Lakes to the mid-Atlantic coast to New England.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2014
Satellite images of the storm that caused historic flooding in Baltimore and other parts of the Northeast show a system massive enough to rival some tropical storms that have hit the region. The image above was taken Tuesday from several orbits of the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership, or Suomi NPP, a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration satellite. See the original here , along with other NOAA satellite images. The system stretched from the Great Lakes to the mid-Atlantic coast to New England.
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NEWS
May 23, 2014
Since October 2008, I have been calling on my colleagues in the House of Representatives to fix the unintended consequences associated with American satellite export regulations that treat all satellites and satellite parts - down to the nuts and bolts - as weapons. These outdated regulations known as the International Traffic in Arms Regulations, or "ITAR," have cost the industry an estimated $21 billion in lost revenues and 28,000 jobs a year to European companies that have long been marketing their products as "ITAR-free.
BUSINESS
By Sean Welsh, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2014
Baltimore's Latino Economic Development Center will open a satellite office along Eastern Avenue in Highlandtown, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake announced Wednesday. The office, to be located in space donated by the Southeast Community Development Corporation, is being set up to provide support "to existing and potential immigrant business owners," according to a release from the mayor's office. The office will help those business owners and potential owners with loans, technical assistance and training, the release said.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2012
Weather watchers described Hurricane Sandy's path as unusual as it plowed into the New Jersey coast, and satellite images may show just how strange it looked. The view from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's GOES-14 satellite shows the storm churning through the Bahamas and off the Carolinas before it makes a beeline for the Jersey shore. The animation was compiled by the Space Science and Engineering Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. GOES-14 acts as a backup to two other main weather satellites that cover the western and eastern sides of the U.S. but because of problems with GOES-13 in the east, GOES-14 was activated for October.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2011
Police Officer Sarah Miller has already filled her new headquarters in Columbia's Owen Brown Village Center with large wall maps, informational brochures and community fliers, dozens of coloring books and a bowl brimming with lollipops. After months on bicycle patrol, she knows her territory and now has a spot from which she can direct efforts to safeguard the village she serves. "I wanted as many maps as possible," she said. "Owen Brown can be a confusing area geographically.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez, For The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2013
Looking for a little love or the purrr-fect present this year? It just got easier thanks to the Maryland SPCA's first satellite adoption center and Project Adopt, which opened Saturday in White Marsh Mall. The satellite center, which will be open through the December holidays, will host cats and kittens available for adoption on Fridays from 2 to 8 p.m., and Saturdays and Sundays from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. The felines will be transported to and from the SPCA's main shelter before and after each weekend, and there is no time limit to how long a pet can stay in the program.
BUSINESS
By Sean Welsh, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2014
Baltimore's Latino Economic Development Center will open a satellite office along Eastern Avenue in Highlandtown, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake announced Wednesday. The office, to be located in space donated by the Southeast Community Development Corporation, is being set up to provide support "to existing and potential immigrant business owners," according to a release from the mayor's office. The office will help those business owners and potential owners with loans, technical assistance and training, the release said.
BUSINESS
By Paul Sloan and Paul Sloan,Bloomberg Business News | August 9, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Continuing a tug-of-war over a multibillion-dollar spy-satellite program, TRW Inc. has challenged the government's decision to take away the contract it won last year, according to people familiar with the program.The federal government gave the top-secret contract for next-generation signals-intelligence satellites to Martin Marietta Corp. two weeks ago after the company successfully protested the award to TRW.TRW's appeal to the government's General Accounting Office halts the contract for the satellites, which will eavesdrop on electronic signals over sea and land.
BUSINESS
May 9, 1996
CTA Inc., a Rockville-based satellite communications company, said yesterday that it has realigned its corporate structure to focus on areas with high growth potential.As part of the plan, CTA will launch a new business unit called the CTA Space and Telecommunications Co., which will combine several existing divisions. The new business will focus on satellite and ground station manufacturing, spacecraft design, test and flight operations and satellite-related equipment and software.CTA Chief Executive C. E. "Tom" Velez said the company has hired Ricardo de Bastos, a veteran satellite industry executive, to serve as president of the new company.
NEWS
May 23, 2014
Since October 2008, I have been calling on my colleagues in the House of Representatives to fix the unintended consequences associated with American satellite export regulations that treat all satellites and satellite parts - down to the nuts and bolts - as weapons. These outdated regulations known as the International Traffic in Arms Regulations, or "ITAR," have cost the industry an estimated $21 billion in lost revenues and 28,000 jobs a year to European companies that have long been marketing their products as "ITAR-free.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2014
The first U.S.-launched satellite, Explorer I, was 6 feet long and weighed 30 pounds, and it led to the discovery of the Van Allen radiation belt that surrounds Earth. More than 50 years later, scientists could do a lot more with far less. Scientists in Maryland are helping to design satellites that could fit in a shoebox yet provide the same - or better - capabilities as NASA spacecraft that are far larger and more costly. The devices, composed of one or more 10-centimeter cubes, have been used over the past decade for affordable yet relatively low-tech experiments for university students, but a pair recently launched could advance the technology.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez, For The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2013
Looking for a little love or the purrr-fect present this year? It just got easier thanks to the Maryland SPCA's first satellite adoption center and Project Adopt, which opened Saturday in White Marsh Mall. The satellite center, which will be open through the December holidays, will host cats and kittens available for adoption on Fridays from 2 to 8 p.m., and Saturdays and Sundays from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. The felines will be transported to and from the SPCA's main shelter before and after each weekend, and there is no time limit to how long a pet can stay in the program.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2013
Scientists have gathered a year's worth of satellite observations to create an image showing just how much of Earth is covered in green. The satellite is NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Suomi NPP, which is able to detect subtle differences in vegetation around the globe. Compiling the data resulted in a picture revealing the world's lushest forests and most barren deserts. "The darkest green areas are the lushest in vegetation, while the pale colors are sparse in vegetation cover either due to snow, drought, rock, or urban areas," according to NOAA.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2013
A NASA satellite's images show thunderstorm clouds nearly 9 miles high around Tropical Storm Andrea -- areas that could bring heavy downpours to some parts of Maryland on Friday. NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (or TRMM satellite) flew above the storm Thursday, revealing a large area of moderate to heavy rainfall in the northeast quadrant of the storm as it passed over Florida, according to the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Scientists at Goddard developed an animation of the satellite images, seen above.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2013
Sinclair Broadcast Group is warning DirecTV customers in Baltimore and other markets they could lose access to Sinclair-owned stations starting March 1 because of an inability to reach agreement over the amount the satellite company pays to carry the stations and their programs. In the Baltimore market, Sinclair owns WBFF Fox 45 and has a local marketing agreement with WNUV The CW Baltimore. Sinclair's "carriage" agreement with DirecTV, which includes both stations, ends Feb. 28. "Although DirecTV and Sinclair have been negotiating for quite some time in an effort to reach a new agreement, at this time it does not appear that these efforts will be successful," Baltimore-based Sinclair said in a statement.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Sun Staff Writer | February 12, 1995
The people who take gas and electric meter readings could be replaced by a satellite now orbiting the Earth and capable of reading as many as 20,000 meters in as little as 12 minutes.Final Analysis Inc., a small, privately owned technology company in Greenbelt, built the satellite and launched it Jan. 24 from near Moscow aboard a Cosmos rocket.The key, though, may not lie in the technology but in whether the company can reduce costs enough to make it affordable.Peggy Mulloy, a spokeswoman for Baltimore Gas and Electric Co., said the utility has looked into the system.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Sun Staff Writer | June 2, 1994
In a move that could make it an industry leader in the production and launch of small satellites, Orbital Sciences Corp. has agreed to buy Germantown-based Fairchild Space and Defense Corp. from its French owner for about $95 million.The acquisition would double employment for Dulles, Va.-based Orbital and boost revenue in its satellite operations "two- to threefold," the company said yesterday."This an exciting move for us, both strategically and financially," said David E. Thompson, president and chief executive.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | December 21, 2012
If a tree falls in Maryland's forests — even if no one hears it — researchers soon will have a handle on how much it could contribute to global warming. A pair of geographical scientists at the University of Maryland, College Park is leading an ambitious effort to map the state's forests and measure changes over time in the amount of carbon stockpiled in the trees. With a $1.4 million grant from NASA, the research team hopes to use satellite imagery, aerial photography and ground observations to develop new methods for tracking the carbon stored in woodlands, which could be applied locally, nationally and globally.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2012
Weather watchers described Hurricane Sandy's path as unusual as it plowed into the New Jersey coast, and satellite images may show just how strange it looked. The view from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's GOES-14 satellite shows the storm churning through the Bahamas and off the Carolinas before it makes a beeline for the Jersey shore. The animation was compiled by the Space Science and Engineering Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. GOES-14 acts as a backup to two other main weather satellites that cover the western and eastern sides of the U.S. but because of problems with GOES-13 in the east, GOES-14 was activated for October.
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