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Satchel Paige

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NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Staff Writer | May 23, 1992
In a nation torn by AIDS, city violence, and broken families, "This world needs more Satchel Paiges," the nation's top health official told 1,202 graduating students at the University of Maryland at Baltimore yesterday.Secretary of Health and Human Services Louis W. Sullivan used Paige, the famed black baseball pitcher who labored in the Negro Leagues for 20 years before making the majors, as an example of perseverance in hard times."Satchel Paige labored 20 years, and that's what America needs more of: people who will challenge themselves," Dr. Sullivan said.
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SPORTS
By Dan Connolly | April 18, 2012
This is worth writing about, even though in Jamie Moyer's last game as an Oriole I was still single. I got married a week after Moyer last pitched for Baltimore, back in 1995, his third and final season here. That was before three kids and 16 years of wedded bliss for me. That's how we mark Moyer's career these days, in our own timeline: where we were when he did what. His first win, June 16, 1986 with the Chicago Cubs, came as I had just finished my junior year in high school.
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NEWS
By Milton Bates | April 4, 1994
DON'T LOOK BACK: Satchel Paige in the Shadows of Baseball. By Mark Ribowsky. Simon & Schuster. 338 pages. $22.50.IN HIS remarkable, nearly 40-year career of throwing baseballs for a living, Alabama-born Leroy Robert "Satchel" Paige moved at two speeds: very fast and very slow. The first characterized both his "bee ball" and "jump ball," as he called his swift pitches, perhaps the most unhittable in the history of the game.But it was Paige's "hesitation pitch" that he mimicked in the pace with which he approached the mound in Cleveland's Municipal Stadium on a July afternoon in 1948.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 6, 2004
Richard Dennis Powell, who brought the Elite Giants of the Negro Leagues to Baltimore from Nashville, Tenn., and later became the team's business and general manager, died of cancer Tuesday at his daughter's Glenwood home. He was 92. Mr. Powell was thought to be the last surviving executive of black baseball, from the days when the game was segregated, and was responsible for persuading owner "Smiling" Tom Wilson and Vernon Green, business manager, to relocate the team to Baltimore in 1938.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | February 25, 1997
Black History Month came alive for students at Columbia's Swansfield Elementary School yesterday with an interactive look black accomplishments -- from inventions and military feats to music and baseball.A retired Negro League baseball player described the days of segregated sports. A former Tuskegee Airman recounted dogfights against the Germans. A storyteller delighted youngsters with a tale about a Tanzanian girl. And parents gave pupils a tour of African and African-American history through displays in the hallways of the school.
SPORTS
By Doug Brown and Doug Brown,Staff Writer | July 14, 1993
The 25 heroes from another baseball era sat in a semicircle of chairs on the stage, relating their biggest thrills.One of them, Monte Irvin, who had the thrill of putting on a New York Giants uniform for the first time in 1949 after years in the Negro Leagues, said, "There's $100 million worth of talent here by today's market."The oldest of the old stars at the Negro Leagues Symposium at the Upper Deck All-Star FanFest at Festival Hall yesterday was Ted "Double Duty" Radcliffe, who turned 91 last Wednesday.
SPORTS
By Tom Keegan and Tom Keegan,Sun Staff Writer | May 4, 1994
To even the casual baseball fan, Satchel Paige, the ageless pitcher, and Josh Gibson, the power-hitting catcher, are familiar names.PTC To some, the name Cool Papa even rings a vague bell. "Cool Papa" Bell was the center fielder who claimed to be so fast that he could flick a light switch and be in bed before the room grew dark.The same name recognition factor does not hold true for Willie Wells, a fleet shortstop adept at stealing bases and signs.Or "Double Duty" Radcliffe, the pitcher/catcher whose chest protector bore the warning "Thou shalt not steal."
FEATURES
By Molly Dunham Glassman and Molly Dunham Glassman,Sun Staff Writer | September 23, 1994
Despite its drawbacks -- most notably a slow pace that drags to a halt when self-important authors speak of the game in reverent tones -- Ken Burns' "Baseball" series, currently playing on PBS, deserves praise for its coverage of the Negro Leagues.Here's hoping that kids who may have been lulled to sleep the first few nights of the series were tuned into the segment on pitcher Satchel Paige and catcher Josh Gibson. Not to be missed is Sunday's installment, which focuses on Jackie Robinson's breaking of the color barrier.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | February 25, 1997
Black History Month came alive for students at Columbia's Swansfield Elementary School yesterday with an interactive look black accomplishments -- from inventions and military feats to music and baseball.A retired Negro League baseball player described the days of segregated sports. A former Tuskegee Airman recounted dogfights against the Germans. A storyteller delighted youngsters with a tale about a 5-year-old Tanzanian girl. And parents gave pupils a tour of African and African-American history through displays in the hallways of the school on Cedar Lane.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly | April 18, 2012
This is worth writing about, even though in Jamie Moyer's last game as an Oriole I was still single. I got married a week after Moyer last pitched for Baltimore, back in 1995, his third and final season here. That was before three kids and 16 years of wedded bliss for me. That's how we mark Moyer's career these days, in our own timeline: where we were when he did what. His first win, June 16, 1986 with the Chicago Cubs, came as I had just finished my junior year in high school.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | August 21, 2003
Herbert B. Kempner, a former electrical supply company owner and semipro baseball outfielder who once batted against Satchel Paige, died of heart disease Tuesday at St. Agnes HealthCare. The Catonsville resident was 84. Mr. Kempner was born in Hartford, Conn., and raised in New York from about age 10, when his family moved to the Bronx. His father died of pneumonia when Mr. Kempner was 13, and he became the primary breadwinner for his family. He held a series of jobs, including supply clerk at Macy's, where he was issued a pair of roller skates as part of his uniform.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | March 30, 1999
The kids from Baltimore's St. Ignatius Loyola Academy returned to the United States from Cuba last night to more than a hundred cheering loved ones and a new sense of how people of different colors can get along."
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | February 25, 1997
Black History Month came alive for students at Columbia's Swansfield Elementary School yesterday with an interactive look black accomplishments -- from inventions and military feats to music and baseball.A retired Negro League baseball player described the days of segregated sports. A former Tuskegee Airman recounted dogfights against the Germans. A storyteller delighted youngsters with a tale about a Tanzanian girl. And parents gave pupils a tour of African and African-American history through displays in the hallways of the school.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | February 25, 1997
Black History Month came alive for students at Columbia's Swansfield Elementary School yesterday with an interactive look black accomplishments -- from inventions and military feats to music and baseball.A retired Negro League baseball player described the days of segregated sports. A former Tuskegee Airman recounted dogfights against the Germans. A storyteller delighted youngsters with a tale about a 5-year-old Tanzanian girl. And parents gave pupils a tour of African and African-American history through displays in the hallways of the school on Cedar Lane.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | March 16, 1995
Sam Lacy, now entering the springtime of his 91st year, is rushing out the door to play golf when the phone call arrives: Does he remember Leon Day? Does he remember? He remembers and remembers and remembers.Lacy is our link with the vanishing past. Leon Day departs, six days after election to baseball's Hall of Fame, and everyone must describe him with secondhand language and meager scraps of fact from a distinguished career: the 18 strikeouts over at old Bugle Field, the wins over the legendary Satchel Paige, the no-hitter he pitched after his return from World War II, but so little beyond that to flesh out the story.
NEWS
By Brad Snyder and Brad Snyder,Sun Staff Writer | March 14, 1995
Leon Day, a star Negro league pitcher with the Newark Eagles, died yesterday at St. Agnes Hospital, six days after being elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame.Mr. Day was 78."I think that's what he was waiting for," said his sister, Ida May Bolden, who lived with Mr. Day and his wife, Geraldine, in West Baltimore. "I expected him to pass before the voting."Mr. Day, who suffered from diabetes, gout, and heart and kidney problems, died about 4:30 p.m. of heart failure.His sister and many former Negro-leaguers remember him as the Newark Eagles' ace pitcher.
NEWS
By Karen Zeiler | February 5, 1993
BOARD A BATTLEAXE:Line up for a look at the HMS Battleaxe -- the first large ship to visit the Inner Harbor's West Wall in 1993. You may remember it from Tom Clancy's second novel, "Red Storm Rising," a military techno-thriller.A crew of 232, plus 63 officer cadets from Britannia Royal Naval College, are here, too. The ship sails at 9 a.m Monday for Annapolis, where it will stay until Feb. 11. Docked at the Inner Harbor's West Wall, the British warship will be open for tours from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. tomorrow and from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday only.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | March 16, 1995
Sam Lacy, now entering the springtime of his 91st year, is rushing out the door to play golf when the phone call arrives: Does he remember Leon Day? Does he remember? He remembers and remembers and remembers.Lacy is our link with the vanishing past. Leon Day departs, six days after election to baseball's Hall of Fame, and everyone must describe him with secondhand language and meager scraps of fact from a distinguished career: the 18 strikeouts over at old Bugle Field, the wins over the legendary Satchel Paige, the no-hitter he pitched after his return from World War II, but so little beyond that to flesh out the story.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | February 8, 1995
Much has been written -- in his hometown paper and elsewhere -- in commemoration of Babe Ruth's centennial earlier this week, but one tidbit has received little press. In 1931, a 17-year-old woman named Jackie Mitchell struck out both the Babe and Lou Gehrig in an exhibition game between the Chattanooga Lookouts and the New York Yankees.The Playwrights Theatre of Baltimore has cleverly taken advantage of the centennial hoopla by producing the world premiere of a play about Mitchell, "Boys & Girls Together," by Michael Dale.
FEATURES
By Molly Dunham Glassman and Molly Dunham Glassman,Sun Staff Writer | September 23, 1994
Despite its drawbacks -- most notably a slow pace that drags to a halt when self-important authors speak of the game in reverent tones -- Ken Burns' "Baseball" series, currently playing on PBS, deserves praise for its coverage of the Negro Leagues.Here's hoping that kids who may have been lulled to sleep the first few nights of the series were tuned into the segment on pitcher Satchel Paige and catcher Josh Gibson. Not to be missed is Sunday's installment, which focuses on Jackie Robinson's breaking of the color barrier.
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