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NEWS
By Eli Hecht | March 13, 1996
THE RECENT news from Jerusalem is of daily murders, innocent people killed by bombs and new acts of terrorism. I wonder what is happening to the country of Israel. What was supposed to be a peace-loving state has turned into a nightmare.I recall a story that truly describes the situation.Satan once called together the ghosts of his devils. Attending were Adolf Eichmann, Adolf Hitler and the grand mufti of old Jerusalem. The agenda was the never-ending plans for destroying the Jewish people.
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NEWS
May 15, 2014
It seemed that Pope Francis was open to new ideas with a passion for helping to understand and alleviate the problems of poverty, violence and abuse. It is very disappointing to read that he is looking at Satan as the reason for mental illness and possibly other issues facing all of us ("Pope targets ancient nemesis: Satan," May 14). God gave us brains. I think he wants us to use them to find methods for making sense of the world other than sweeping it all under the carpet of evil, which exonerates us from accepting responsibility for our own failings.
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NEWS
By Clarence Page | September 29, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The devil, you say? His ears must be burning more than usual these days. Ol' Beelzebub's name is getting called into political service, from the loonier corners of the left to the most self-righteous regions of the right. "Yesterday, the devil came here," Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez said in a speech delivered in Spanish before the United Nations. El diablo of whom he spoke was President Bush. "Right here," he said, drawing laughter by blessing himself with the sign of the cross, folding his hands as if in prayer and glancing heavenward.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2010
"Drag Me to Hell," an exuberant laugh-and-cringe flick, is the most entertaining American horror movie of the past 10 years — a perfect choice for the Pratt to screen at 2 p.m. Saturday. Sam Raimi's tale of a bank loan officer (Allison Lohman) who incurs a gypsy curse is rooted in a sense of character that goes beyond bent, folded and mutilated anatomies. Lohman's basically warm, decent young woman is a lot like Bill Paxton and Bridget Fonda in Raimi's suspense film, "A Simple Plan.
NEWS
By David Ritchie | May 14, 1991
MAYBE you think the younger generation is going to hel these days. But you may not take that thought literally until you hear a conversation like one I overheard recently in a bookstore.Two teen-age boys with a much younger lad in tow were checking out the "Occult" section for books about Satan. I didn't hear all of their conversation, but it went roughly as follows.One of the older boys seemed disappointed that he couldn't find a certain work.evillest book in the world, and they don't have it!
NEWS
By Tyrone Richardson and Tyrone Richardson,SUN STAFF | May 3, 2005
They had a devil of a time doing it, but residents of Satan Wood Drive in Columbia should finally be rid today of a street name that's made their neighborhood the target of bad jokes for some 30 years. If all goes according to plan, Howard County workers will replace the offending street name - the product of a simple mistake three decades ago - with signs bearing the U-shaped street's new official name: Satinwood Drive. "It's done, we're glad about it and we're happy campers now," said Barbara Chapman, a four-year resident of the street in Columbia's Hickory Ridge village, and one of those who signed a petition calling on the county to change the name.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dan Cryer and Dan Cryer,Newsday | July 4, 2004
There's a little bit of devil in Andrei Codrescu. On second thought, make that a helluva lot. First of all, take a look at that impish grin, as though the man is ready to entice you into committing four or five of the Seven Deadly Sins. Next, just tune in to your local National Public Radio station. That ghoulishly accented commentator -- Transylvanian? Lower Slobovian? That's Codrescu. He sounds like an emissary from Lucifer himself. Fundamentalist Christians certainly thought so a few years ago, when he gently poked fun at their belief in the Rapture.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | December 28, 2003
WASHINGTON - Buffalo's Miroslav Satan saw Washington Capitals goalie Olie Kolzig leave the net and go after the loose puck behind and to the left of the goal and decided to follow him. "I knew what he was going to do," Satan said. "I knew he'd send it around behind the net, but I didn't expect him to misfire on it. I thought he'd send it round along the boards. That's when I got lucky." Satan intercepted the bouncing puck intended for Caps defenseman Joel Kwiatkowski, swung around to the front of the net and tucked it in. The first-period goal wasn't the game-winner, but it was the one that changed the flow of the game and eventually led to Buffalo's 3-1 victory.
SPORTS
By Andy Knobel and Andy Knobel,SUN STAFF | September 8, 2002
Stick a pitchfork in them, the Devils Lake High School Satans are done. The Devils Lake, N.D., school board unanimously voted Monday night to drop the nickname and mascot and start the process of finding a new name to represent its athletic teams. "It's hard to stand up and cheer for the Satans," said Kellie Karlstad, a parent of three and the junior varsity girls basketball coach. "It's not an appropriate name for children." The nickname, used for nearly 80 years, had come under stiff community resistance the past 20 years.
TOPIC
By MIKE ADAMS | May 2, 1999
FOR NEARLY two weeks, we've listened to psychologists, pop culture experts, police, politicians, educators -- even religious leaders -- as they tried to make sense of the shooting rampage at Columbine High School.They've blamed it on the Internet, violent video games, a permissive society, the modern dysfunctional family, the gun culture, violence in films and television, bigotry, alienation, and the failure by the Littleton, Colo., school to identify the two shooters, Dylan Klebold and Eric Harris, as potentially violent.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | March 20, 2009
Charles Joseph "Jeff" Croghan, a World War II B-24 tail gunner who later became a Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. supervisor, died Mondayof liver failure at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. He was 84. Mr. Croghan was born in Baltimore and raised on McElderry Street. He was a 1942 graduate of Polytechnic Institute. He was drafted into the Army Air Forces in 1943, and after being trained as a gunner, he joined the 450th Bombardment Group of the 15th Air Force at Manduria, Italy. He was a tail gunner aboard Satan's Gal, a B-24 Liberator bomber, whose crew consisted of four officers and six enlisted men, and he flew on 50 missions over Nazi-occupied Europe from the base in Manduria.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | December 23, 2007
When I started out in the newspaper business, I spent many an hour with the North Attleboro, Mass., Board of Selectmen. An invisible partner in their deliberations, I learned, was "old deluder Satan." The selectmen were town fathers elected to handle the town's business - not including the school system's budget. That bit of important public business was left in the hands of educators. The reasoning? If politicians were allowed to get their hands on the money, "old deluder Satan" would be free to lead them away from the best interests of the children.
NEWS
August 19, 2007
Israel condemns `Satan' remarks TEHRAN, Iran -- Hard-line President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad said yesterday that Israel was the standard bearer of Satan and that the Jewish state would soon fall apart, the official Islamic Republic News Agency reported. The agency quoted Ahmadinejad as he spoke at a religious conference and did not elaborate on what he meant by Satan. Since the 1979 Islamic revolution, however, Iran has regularly referred to the United States as "the Great Satan." Israel condemned Ahmadinejad's statements as harmful to international peace and stability.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | September 29, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The devil, you say? His ears must be burning more than usual these days. Ol' Beelzebub's name is getting called into political service, from the loonier corners of the left to the most self-righteous regions of the right. "Yesterday, the devil came here," Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez said in a speech delivered in Spanish before the United Nations. El diablo of whom he spoke was President Bush. "Right here," he said, drawing laughter by blessing himself with the sign of the cross, folding his hands as if in prayer and glancing heavenward.
NEWS
By Evan Osnos and Evan Osnos,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 12, 2005
TEHRAN, Iran - Confetti littered a street filled with dance music. It was 10 p.m., and young men and women were packed together, shouting, dancing and wandering in unbridled celebration of a victory by the Iranian national soccer team. Very little of that scene last week was lawful in the Islamic Republic of Iran. But it's campaign season here, and candidates are aiming to please. Even the campaign office for the 70-year-old Muslim cleric and presidential front-runner, Hashemi Rafsanjani, lofted a disco ball above the road, and teenage boys break-danced in its rainbow swirls of light.
NEWS
By Tyrone Richardson and Tyrone Richardson,SUN STAFF | May 3, 2005
They had a devil of a time doing it, but residents of Satan Wood Drive in Columbia should finally be rid today of a street name that's made their neighborhood the target of bad jokes for some 30 years. If all goes according to plan, Howard County workers will replace the offending street name - the product of a simple mistake three decades ago - with signs bearing the U-shaped street's new official name: Satinwood Drive. "It's done, we're glad about it and we're happy campers now," said Barbara Chapman, a four-year resident of the street in Columbia's Hickory Ridge village, and one of those who signed a petition calling on the county to change the name.
NEWS
By William Wan and William Wan,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2005
The U-shaped street in Columbia was supposed to be named Satin Wood Drive, based on an obscure poem by a whimsical poet. But the devil, it turns out, was in the details. About 30 years ago, somewhere between the developer's plans and the county's official map, a misplaced letter doomed the residents of Satan Wood Drive. "You almost feel ostracized, like you're the black sheep of the village," said Jamie Aycock, 31, an electrical engineer who lives on the block in Hickory Ridge Village.
NEWS
May 15, 2014
It seemed that Pope Francis was open to new ideas with a passion for helping to understand and alleviate the problems of poverty, violence and abuse. It is very disappointing to read that he is looking at Satan as the reason for mental illness and possibly other issues facing all of us ("Pope targets ancient nemesis: Satan," May 14). God gave us brains. I think he wants us to use them to find methods for making sense of the world other than sweeping it all under the carpet of evil, which exonerates us from accepting responsibility for our own failings.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 18, 2005
The same pop Catholicism that spawned The Exorcist and fueled the horror-film ambience of The Passion of the Christ permeates The Passion of Keanu - I mean, Constantine. This new graphic-novel-based horror fantasy, starring Keanu Reeves as a private eye of the old sort of underworld, is like an errant altar boy's vision of good and evil, as if the blood-and-guts comic book he kept in his back pocket under his robes bled into the Book of Revelations along with a splash of wine. It's about as adult and coherent as you'd expect from such a mess.
NEWS
By William Wan and William Wan,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2005
The U-shaped street in Columbia was supposed to be named Satin Wood Drive, based on an obscure poem by a whimsical poet. But the devil, it turns out, was in the details. About 30 years ago, somewhere between the developer's plans and the county's official map, a misplaced letter doomed the residents of Satan Wood Drive. "You almost feel ostracized, like you're the black sheep of the village," said Jamie Aycock, 31, an electrical engineer who lives on the block in Hickory Ridge Village.
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