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By Lou Boulmetis, hippodromehatter@aol.com | November 24, 2011
The bright red and yellow-orange leaves on 8-foot trees were my first clue that a clump of sassafras trees had taken root in a drainage ditch. Once I spotted the mitten-shaped leaves, I knew it was just a matter of time before I'd be sitting next to a fire with a home-brewed cup of sassafras tea in one hand and a gardening book in the other. I first learned about sassafras tea as a Boy Scout. American colonists first learned about it from native Americans who used it mostly to relieve pain and fever.
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By Lou Boulmetis, hippodromehatter@aol.com | November 24, 2011
The bright red and yellow-orange leaves on 8-foot trees were my first clue that a clump of sassafras trees had taken root in a drainage ditch. Once I spotted the mitten-shaped leaves, I knew it was just a matter of time before I'd be sitting next to a fire with a home-brewed cup of sassafras tea in one hand and a gardening book in the other. I first learned about sassafras tea as a Boy Scout. American colonists first learned about it from native Americans who used it mostly to relieve pain and fever.
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FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | March 8, 2003
The group show at Sassafras in Waverly is the gallery's first exhibition devoted solely to photography, which is surely something to celebrate. And it's entirely fitting that the show is entitled Lightroom/Darkroom, a shorthand reference to the digital imaging revolution that is fast replacing traditional chemical processing of films and prints. The Sassafras show features the work of 14 area artists whose disparate styles are held together by the fact that they all love photography and all work in the time-honored medium of black-and-white.
NEWS
By C. FRASER SMITH | April 23, 2006
Everybody talks in politics about cooperation across the partisan divide, of cooperating for the greater good. All very nice - even smart - and yet almost nobody does it. So photographs in the newspaper last week featuring Republican Rep. Wayne T. Gilchrest and Democrat Rep. Elijah E. Cummings on a happy-talk tour of Maryland's Eastern Shore had a certain shock value. One of the shots caught the Republican helping the Democrat into a pair of protective booties. They were about to start wading through manure on a Kent County dairy farm owned by Howard McHenry.
FEATURES
By Alexa James and Alexa James,SUN STAFF | June 19, 2002
Three years ago, Mark Cottman took a chance. Now, on the eve of a major exhibition at a local art gallery, he's taking a deep breath. Cottman organizes his dreams by levels, and with this show, he's ready to climb. Eight years into a career as an architectural engineer, Cottman decided there were too many creative muscles he had yet to flex. Architectural design had become too rote. "It was like eating with a fork instead of your hands," he says. While friends and co-workers questioned his sanity, Cottman traded in his home in Randallstown, his SUV, his designer dress shirts and his retirement fund for art supplies, computer equipment, a minivan and a run-down brick rectory on Guilford Avenue.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Staff | July 8, 2001
Bread and flowers and locally grown tomatoes seem to have little in common with art, but in Baltimore these days there's a connection. That's because the Sassafras art gallery sits on Barclay Street across from the Waverly Farmer's Market, and is open Saturday mornings during market hours. Ever since the gallery -- which features an ever-changing array of work by local artists -- opened last fall, folks have purchased their cheese, flowers and fruit for the week, then crossed the street to gaze at the art. Sometimes they purchase a painting or sculpture, too. Gallery owner Linda C. Richardson has a way of creating art spaces in which diverse groups of people feel welcomed and comfortable.
NEWS
November 10, 2004
To make the brine for Patrick O'Connell's Spruced-Up Turkey recipe that ran in Taste last week, only loose sassafras tea should be used. The bark of sassafras root as a food additive is banned by the Food and Drug Administration.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 8, 2003
A bloom of blue-green algae spotted by state officials on the Sassafras River has prompted the closure of Betterton Beach in Kent County, officials announced yesterday. The Microcystis aeruginosa bloom - first seen by Maryland Department of Natural Resources officials July 17 on Turner Creek - has expanded down the Sassafras River to the beach. Kent County health officials decided to close the beach area after several people who swam nearby last weekend reported itching and rashes, according to DNR officials.
NEWS
By John Thanos | May 22, 1994
I pondered 'bout the rainbowAnd then of sugary sweets'Bout the Baker's dozen,Of cookie jars and treats. . . .Drifting even further,A walkin thru the past,Barefootin down the hollow's,A chewin sassafras. . . .Yonder ways I saw,A farmer's long straight row,The harvest-moon arisin,Set off a fiery glow. . . .The crickets started creakin,They could have woke the dead,As thru the past I journeyed,, To my old feather bed. . . .
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | August 10, 2001
Potentially poisonous freshwater algae are blooming in the upper reaches of the Chesapeake Bay and in the Sassafras, Elk and Bohemia rivers. State biologists discovered dense blooms of Microcystis, which looks like a spill of blue-green or yellow-green paint, during routine sampling Tuesday. The algae blooms stretch across the upper bay "from the mouth of the Sassafras all the way over to Aberdeen and north a little way," said David M. Goshorn of the Maryland Department of Natural Resources.
NEWS
November 10, 2004
To make the brine for Patrick O'Connell's Spruced-Up Turkey recipe that ran in Taste last week, only loose sassafras tea should be used. The bark of sassafras root as a food additive is banned by the Food and Drug Administration.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | November 9, 2004
In Baltimore City 15-year-old jailed on murder charge indicted in 2nd killing A 15-year-old boy already jailed on a murder charge was indicted yesterday in a second, unrelated killing, prosecutors said. Nathaniel Sassafras had been charged with the May shooting of 22-year-old Jason Baughman, outside a West Baltimore convenience store, according to court documents. The new indictment alleges that Sassafras -- who lived in the 600 block of N. Dukeland St. -- killed 15-year-old Earl Rodney Monroe Jr. on June 26. The shooting in the 2600 block of Lauretta Ave. drew increased attention because Monroe had been arrested and set free from the state juvenile center 11 times in the 15 months before he was killed.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER and ROB KASPER,SUN STAFF | November 3, 2004
Clarification To make the brine for Patrick O'Connell's Spruced-Up Turkey recipe that ran in Taste last week, only loose sassafras tea should be used. The bark of sassafras root as a food additive is banned by the Food and Drug Administration. It's decision time. Three weeks from tomorrow is Thanksgiving and you have important choices to make: sweet potatoes or mashed potatoes, pumpkin pie or pecan pie, pinot grigio or zinfandel, brined turkey or plain turkey? And despite our images of Norman Rockwell paintings, not every family gathered around the Thanksgiving table will look alike.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 8, 2003
A bloom of blue-green algae spotted by state officials on the Sassafras River has prompted the closure of Betterton Beach in Kent County, officials announced yesterday. The Microcystis aeruginosa bloom - first seen by Maryland Department of Natural Resources officials July 17 on Turner Creek - has expanded down the Sassafras River to the beach. Kent County health officials decided to close the beach area after several people who swam nearby last weekend reported itching and rashes, according to DNR officials.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | March 8, 2003
The group show at Sassafras in Waverly is the gallery's first exhibition devoted solely to photography, which is surely something to celebrate. And it's entirely fitting that the show is entitled Lightroom/Darkroom, a shorthand reference to the digital imaging revolution that is fast replacing traditional chemical processing of films and prints. The Sassafras show features the work of 14 area artists whose disparate styles are held together by the fact that they all love photography and all work in the time-honored medium of black-and-white.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | December 24, 2002
In a holiday season with omens of war in the offing, art that's warm and fuzzy and frankly decorative in intent may be just the thing to help us through a New Year fraught with uncertainty. So you may want to check out the lovely show of contemporary-style Post-Impressionist paintings by Joan Cox and Sheep Jones at the Beveled Edge Gallery in Mount Washington. (So what if Post-Impressionism is already more than 100 years old? Some styles never lose their charm.) Forget about the accompanying artist's statements that seem to want to weigh down these well-crafted, brilliantly colored botanical images with more than their fair share of profundity.
FEATURES
By Laura Barnhardt | August 13, 1995
A roundup of new products and servicesKeen screensLawrence Harbin, owner of Galerie 500, a Capitol Hill art gallery, has created a computer screen saver that displays paintings by African-American artists. Art in the Dark is available in Windows, DOS and Macintosh versions at COMPUSA for $29.95. For more information, call (800) 666-4476. Local computer programmer Nancy L. Hunter has created a fashion statement for the on-line age. She has designed 30 different T-shirts featuring net lingo and smileys, which are used to express emotion on the Internet and other on-line services.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | June 1, 2000
SHALLCROSS CREEK -- It's almost surreal to watch a watercraft built like a cross between a Mississippi side wheeler and a Nebraska corn harvester working its way back and forth across this Eastern Shore creek, ripping out aquatic plants. These aren't the kinds of plants Chesapeake Bay scientists look for as indicators of the estuary's health. They are water chestnuts, an invasive species that forms thick rafts of leaves on bay tributaries, making it difficult to maneuver a canoe and all but impossible to get a powerboat through.
FEATURES
By Alexa James and Alexa James,SUN STAFF | June 19, 2002
Three years ago, Mark Cottman took a chance. Now, on the eve of a major exhibition at a local art gallery, he's taking a deep breath. Cottman organizes his dreams by levels, and with this show, he's ready to climb. Eight years into a career as an architectural engineer, Cottman decided there were too many creative muscles he had yet to flex. Architectural design had become too rote. "It was like eating with a fork instead of your hands," he says. While friends and co-workers questioned his sanity, Cottman traded in his home in Randallstown, his SUV, his designer dress shirts and his retirement fund for art supplies, computer equipment, a minivan and a run-down brick rectory on Guilford Avenue.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | August 10, 2001
Potentially poisonous freshwater algae are blooming in the upper reaches of the Chesapeake Bay and in the Sassafras, Elk and Bohemia rivers. State biologists discovered dense blooms of Microcystis, which looks like a spill of blue-green or yellow-green paint, during routine sampling Tuesday. The algae blooms stretch across the upper bay "from the mouth of the Sassafras all the way over to Aberdeen and north a little way," said David M. Goshorn of the Maryland Department of Natural Resources.
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