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NEWS
By Borzou Daragahi and Borzou Daragahi,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 19, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Prosecutors charging former Iraqi President Saddam Hussein with genocide presented potentially damning documents yesterday in his trial showing that his government used banned chemical weapons in a late-1980s counterinsurgency operation against rebellious Iraqi Kurds. The documents, if authentic, recount the decision-making process behind a chemical weapons attack on Kurdish villagers in northern Iraq. They suggest that Hussein's presidency office was kept regularly informed on the effects and characteristics of chemical weapons and approved their use. Hussein faces the death penalty for charges of mass murder against the Shiite villagers of Dujayl.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2013
In a world of tanks and fighter jets, chemical hazard detection devices aren't exactly high profile. But nothing brings them into the light like a sarin gas attack. Officials at Smiths Detection, which makes detectors locally and overseas that are small enough to take into the field, said they have spotted the firm's units used in Syria as international peacekeepers search for more details about attacks that killed civilians in the war-torn country. "We can't get into, really, specifics of who has our systems or how they're used because of the proprietary nature, but there have been photos that I've seen and others have seen with our LCDs in the hands of U.N. weapons inspectors," said Aaron M. Gagnon, Smiths Detection's director of product management for chemical, biological, trace explosives and radiation protection systems.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 27, 1998
A former military officer used prominently by Cable News Network in a report about the use of nerve gas in an attack during the Vietnam War disputed key points of CNN's representation of his account yesterday.In a telephone interview, Robert Van Buskirk, who was a lieutenant in a secret Special Forces platoon on a raid into Laos in 1970, said he believes CNN's report of the attack is basically accurate but that he did not confirm, as the network implied, that a gas dropped on the rescue site that day was sarin, a lethal nerve gas whose use is outlawed by international law.Also, he said he had not told CNN that a soldier he confronted and killed during that raid was an American defector, but had told the producer that his victim was a blond Caucasian and possibly Russian.
EXPLORE
September 22, 2011
Nerve gas, mustard agent and Sarin are all words most of us would like to never hear pronounced. Along with biological agents and nuclear weapons, they are among the most sinister tools of modern warfare. So feared are they that they are banned under the Geneva Convention's rules of war and have rarely been used. On those occasions when they have been inflicted on populations, mostly by the Iraqi regime of more than a decade ago, the results have been horrifying, even compared to more conventional forms of warfare.
NEWS
By NEWSDAY | September 27, 1996
WASHINGTON -- A preliminary CIA computer model shows a plume of sarin nerve gas drifted over elements of seven U.S. Army divisions after American engineers blew up Iraqi munitions containing 4.8 tons of poison at the end of the 1991 Persian Gulf War, according to administration officials.More than 130,000 troops were in these front-line units in southern Iraq and Kuwait that routed Iraqi President Saddam Hussein's army from Kuwait during the weeklong ground war.But U.S. officials say poor record-keeping by the Pentagon has prevented CIA analysts from making an accurate estimate of how many troops were exposed to the cloud of sarin that drifted more than 62 miles south from an Iraqi bunker complex called Khamisiyah.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 14, 1998
WASHINGTON -- On a September afternoon in 1970, Air Force Lt. Tom Stump flew low over Laos in his A-1 attack plane, supporting a U.S. ground operation against a North Vietnamese stronghold.Stump unloaded bomblets on the enemy troops while other U.S. planes dropped canisters of gas. Crackling over his radio came the sounds of American troops choking and coughing."Those guys got a pretty good dose of the stuff," he recalled. "[The planes] went right in over our guys."That incident is the focus of a report that the gas was sarin -- the substance that killed 12 people on a Tokyo subway in 1995 -- and that it was used against a group of U.S. defectors and that it wounded American troops positioned near the enemy.
NEWS
December 12, 1991
A former high-level official at the National Cancer Institute was charged yesterday by federal authorities with illegally accepting $25,000 to do testing and research for an outside firm and lying about his connections to that firm.Dr. Prem S. Sarin, 57, was deputy director of the institute's laboratory for tumor cell biology. The government alleges that on Jan. 25, 1987, the Homborg Degussa Pharma research firm paid Dr. Sarin $25,000 "for conducting and causing to be conducted virological testing research."
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | July 8, 1992
One of the nation's leading AIDS researchers was convicted by a federal jury in Baltimore yesterday of embezzling money he received for AIDS testing.Prem S. Sarin, 57, a former researcher and deputy chief at the National Cancer Institute's tumor cell biology lab in Bethesda, could receive a maximum penalty of 20 years in prison and a $750,000 fine. U.S. District Judge Marvin J. Garbis scheduled sentencing Oct. 16.The jury of nine women and three men deliberated for nearly four hours before returning guilty verdicts on one felony count of embezzlement and two felony counts of filing false statements against Sarin.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 26, 1995
TOKYO -- The police have found evidence that may link the Aum Shinri Kyo religious sect to the poison gas attack on the Tokyo subway system on Monday, the Kyodo News Agency reported today.While the sect has frequently been mentioned in connection with the attack on five subway cars, the police have not formally said that the sect's leaders are suspects or that they have found any evidence tying them to the attack.Kyodo's dispatch did not describe the evidence that may link Aum to the subway attack, in which 10 people died and more than 5,000 were injured.
NEWS
By Gary Cohn and Gary Cohn,SUN STAFF | July 21, 1997
It is an alarming scenario: terrorists unleash deadly gas in the food court of a crowded mall. Rescue workers rush in and are overcome by toxic fumes. The injury and death toll climbs.That was the script for a Defense Department training film being shot yesterday at the Harford Mall in Bel Air.The film is part of a $42.6 million national program to teach police, firefighters, medics and other emergency workers how to recognize and deal with the possible terrorist use of chemical and biological weapons.
NEWS
By Borzou Daragahi and Borzou Daragahi,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 19, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Prosecutors charging former Iraqi President Saddam Hussein with genocide presented potentially damning documents yesterday in his trial showing that his government used banned chemical weapons in a late-1980s counterinsurgency operation against rebellious Iraqi Kurds. The documents, if authentic, recount the decision-making process behind a chemical weapons attack on Kurdish villagers in northern Iraq. They suggest that Hussein's presidency office was kept regularly informed on the effects and characteristics of chemical weapons and approved their use. Hussein faces the death penalty for charges of mass murder against the Shiite villagers of Dujayl.
NEWS
May 27, 2004
THE PENTAGON has confirmed that traces of the nerve agent sarin were detected in an Iraqi artillery shell that was found and detonated in Baghdad on May 15. To suggest that this discovery proves the Bush administration was right to go to war against Saddam Hussein is close to ludicrous. Yet it would be equally foolhardy simply to dismiss this find. Chemical weapons are serious business -- and where there was one shell, there may be more. Some background: No one disputes that Iraq produced nerve agents, and used them, during the 1980s.
NEWS
By Linda Chavez | May 20, 2004
WASHINGTON - You would have thought that the discovery of an actual weapon of mass destruction in Iraq would be big news, especially since it was aimed at American soldiers. But apparently not in the eyes of most U.S. newspaper editors and network television producers, who chose largely to ignore one of the major stories coming out of Iraq this week. On Monday, the Iraqi Survey Group, which is tasked with searching for Saddam Hussein's WMD, confirmed that an artillery round containing weaponized sarin nerve gas was detonated in an improvised explosive device (IED)
FEATURES
March 20, 2003
March 20 1727: Physicist, mathematician and astronomer Sir Isaac Newton died in London. 1852: Harriet Beecher Stowe's influential novel about slavery, Uncle Tom's Cabin, was first published. 1976: Kidnapped newspaper heiress Patricia Hearst was convicted of armed robbery for her part in a San Francisco bank holdup. 1987: The Food and Drug Administration approved the sale of AZT, a drug shown to prolong the lives of some AIDS patients. 1995: In Tokyo, 12 people were killed, more than 5,500 others sickened when packages containing the poisonous gas sarin leaked on five separate subway trains.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, Ariel Sabar and Tom Bowman and Frank D. Roylance, Ariel Sabar and Tom Bowman,SUN STAFF | October 10, 2002
Deadly nerve warfare agents, including VX and sarin, were released in open--air testing conducted at the Edgewood Arsenal in Harford County in 1965 and 1969, according to information released yesterday by the Defense Department. An undisclosed number of U.S. military personnel dressed in protective suits and masks were exposed to the nerve agents in at least some of the Maryland tests. Pentagon officials said not all of them were informed that chemical and biological agents were being used.
NEWS
By Stephen Bryen | June 24, 2002
WASHINGTON - With all the steps the Bush administration and Congress are taking to protect Americans, I have been waiting for the most important one: Civilian defense. Right now, those of us who are at ground zero in Washington are defenseless. I agree it is a great idea to stockpile iodine pills against radiation sickness and to build up a supply of vaccine against smallpox. It is also logical to develop new and better vaccines against anthrax. But let's face it. All of this won't mean much if there is no distribution system and if people are not prepared to use the antidotes and vaccines.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,Sun Staff Writer | March 21, 1995
The nerve agent linked to the Tokyo subway system poisonings is odorless, tasteless and doesn't irritate the skin. But it can kill within seconds if its vapors are inhaled.Sarin, or what the U.S. Army refers to as Agent GB, is a straw-colored liquid that to date has been developed for military use only, though it has similar properties to commercially produced insecticides such as malathion and parathion.And, apparently, it is not difficult to manufacture."That's one reason they call chemical weapons the poor man's atom bomb," said James M. Allingham, spokesman for U.S. Army's Chemical and Biological Defense Command, headquartered at Aberdeen Proving Ground.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 27, 1995
TOKYO -- The police search of a religious sect's properties focused yesterday on a three-story building that believers say is one of the organization's most holy sites but that authorities say contains a sophisticated chemical laboratory capable of producing large quantities of nerve gas.As snow fell on the placid village where the sect had its main complex, near the foot of Mount Fuji, about 1,000 police officers conducted their search and carted off...
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 3, 1998
WASHINGTON -- CNN retracted yesterday its explosive and widely criticized report that a U.S. military mission during the Vietnam War had used deadly sarin gas to target U.S. defectors, saying an independent review of its story found "serious faults."Tom Johnson, president of the CNN News Group, apologized for the report, which was broadcast June 7 and appeared in Time magazine the next day. He said CNN bore full responsibility for its joint "NewsStand" report with Time."There is insufficient evidence that sarin or any other gas was used" on the mission, Johnson said in a statement.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 27, 1998
A former military officer used prominently by Cable News Network in a report about the use of nerve gas in an attack during the Vietnam War disputed key points of CNN's representation of his account yesterday.In a telephone interview, Robert Van Buskirk, who was a lieutenant in a secret Special Forces platoon on a raid into Laos in 1970, said he believes CNN's report of the attack is basically accurate but that he did not confirm, as the network implied, that a gas dropped on the rescue site that day was sarin, a lethal nerve gas whose use is outlawed by international law.Also, he said he had not told CNN that a soldier he confronted and killed during that raid was an American defector, but had told the producer that his victim was a blond Caucasian and possibly Russian.
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