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By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SUN STAFF | January 2, 2002
Wanna start a food fight? Just say "Sardines!" The little critters can spawn outsized opinions. My household may well be typical. I like them; my husband doesn't. He really doesn't - in fact, he has extracted a promise that I will eat them only when he's not in the house. That would seem to settle the matter, but recent dietary news tempts me to proselytize again, however hopeless the mission. Sardines are enjoying a new status as health food, packed with important nutrients doctors and dietitians are urging us to eat. Sardines are superb sources of protein, calcium and vitamin B-12.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 11, 2008
Past time to invest in improved transit I find it fascinating that in all the years I've sat in traffic on Interstate 83 or Interstate 695 or Light Street, sometimes for 15, 30, 60 minutes, I've never seen an article referring to the cars packed on our region's highways, going nowhere fast, as sardines ("Angry sardines," May 8). I think there is a clear bias here. Why can we sit patiently in traffic but are "frustrated and irritated," as Michael Dresser put it, waiting for the light rail?
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NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 6, 2002
SCOTTBURGH, South Africa - Just after dawn, beyond the breaking waves, the ocean blackens and bubbles like a pot of boiling oil. To the untrained eye, the dark mass chugging up this Indian Ocean shoreline could be dismissed as the shadow of a passing cloud. But to the people living along South Africa's east coast of sugarcane fields and towering beach resorts, the strange sight means only one thing: The sardines have returned. Like the swallows flying every spring to Capistrano or the monarch butterflies wintering in Mexico, millions of the slim silver fish make an annual migration to the shores of South Africa's KwaZulu-Natal province each June and July.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Reporter | May 8, 2008
When the single-car light rail train pulled into Mount Washington station about 3:30 p.m., it was so crowded that David Utley couldn't board it with his bicycle to get to his job at Penn Station. He decided to wait for the next train - which didn't come for another 50 minutes. And it was so overstuffed that Utley just gave up. "Time for Plan B," he said as he wheeled his bike away from the station. The Mount Washington man is one of thousands of light rail riders who have had their lives disrupted as the Maryland Transit Administration grapples with maintenance issues that have sidelined more than three-quarters of its rail cars at peak travel times.
NEWS
September 8, 1992
ON Labor Day 1991, we learned that Blondie Bumstead of comic-strip fame was going to open a food catering business with her best friend Tootsie.This Labor Day brought an even more shocking development in the Bumstead household: After some 60 years of working for J.C. Dithers, Dagwood Bumstead is quitting his office job so he can help wife Blondie with her career.The way Blondie sees it, Dagwood's preoccupation with food makes him a natural for the catering biz. His most famous kitchen creation, of course, is the Dagwood sandwich, an everything-but-the-kitchen-sink smorgasbord between two pieces of bread.
NEWS
By Jonathon Shacat and Jonathon Shacat,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | July 18, 1997
Theatre on the Hill's latest production, "Noises Off," which opens today at Western Maryland College, is more work for the stage crew than for the cast.During both 10-minute intermissions, the crew must completely remake the stage. They remove stairways and the side-pieces of the set, both 15 feet high, and spin a 20-foot section of scenery.The process converts an indoor view of a country home into a backstage view of a theater set."Not many theaters would attempt this show because it entails building a set that is complete on both sides," said Susan Thornton, who portrays Dotty Otley, an actress who plays the maid in this play-within-in-a-play.
NEWS
May 11, 2008
Past time to invest in improved transit I find it fascinating that in all the years I've sat in traffic on Interstate 83 or Interstate 695 or Light Street, sometimes for 15, 30, 60 minutes, I've never seen an article referring to the cars packed on our region's highways, going nowhere fast, as sardines ("Angry sardines," May 8). I think there is a clear bias here. Why can we sit patiently in traffic but are "frustrated and irritated," as Michael Dresser put it, waiting for the light rail?
NEWS
By Juliet Berger | December 6, 1995
PARIS -- In the two and a half years I've lived in Paris there have been transport strikes, but never anything to match this one: The City of Lights has become a single, seething traffic jam, its residents turned into stalwart hikers, bikers, hitchhikers and roller-bladers.A couple of big public-sector unions organized the strike as a protest to Prime Minister Alain Juppe's paring-knife assault on the welfare state. Mr. Juppe hopes to reduce an embarrassingly high deficit so that France won't lose face when European monetary union comes around.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff Writer | June 22, 1994
In yesterday's A La Carte section, a trout was misidentified in a photo.The Sun regrets the errors.It's too bad every copy of Pino Luongo's new cookbook "Fish Talking" doesn't come with a copy of Mr. Luongo, for such is the force of his charm and passion that he would have you doing in two minutes what it will likely take me a whole story to persuade you to try.Mr. Luongo wants you to eat more fish.Not more tuna, salmon and red snapper. Those are "the big guys" -- big fish, hugely popular, and expensive.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 10, 2003
In case you've missed the fact that Fells Point is one happening place, check out its newest hip eating place. Kali's Court Mezze has just opened -- you guessed it -- next door to Kali's Court Restaurant. But, owners Vasili Keramidas, Karen Patten and Eric Losin have made Mezze a contrast to the airy traditional fine dining feel of Kali's. Keramidas says this time they were going for "contemporary and fun." Mezze pops with Mediterranean colors and curves that suggest sea and sand. Walls are turquoise and butterscotch.
TRAVEL
By ALAN SOLOMON and ALAN SOLOMON,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 26, 2006
"Palermo's the most-conquered city in history. First the Phoenicians, the Romans, Carthaginians, Byzantines, then came the Arabs, the Spaniards and the Neopolitans. Now comes ... the American Army!" -- George C. Scott, in the film Patton PALERMO, SICILY / / The Normans. Don't forget the Normans. Or the Greeks, Vandals, Goths, Swabians, Aragonese, Savoyans, Austrians (in a trade for Sardinia and future considerations) and, finally, the Italians, through annexation via a referendum that was probably rigged.
NEWS
By Abigail Tucker and Abigail Tucker,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 2, 2005
BILOXI, Miss. - As they struggle back into town or strike out from their shelters to look for supplies, people born and raised here are learning the landscape again. Wandering beneath beheaded palm trees, they note Spanish mansions, and point out the drowned pier and upended pinball machines on the beach. They scavenge the remains of a tourist trap on Highway 90, targeting casino-themed Biloxi mugs as though their hometown were someplace they had never been before. And in a sense, it is. Residents here are as altered as their surroundings.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 10, 2003
In case you've missed the fact that Fells Point is one happening place, check out its newest hip eating place. Kali's Court Mezze has just opened -- you guessed it -- next door to Kali's Court Restaurant. But, owners Vasili Keramidas, Karen Patten and Eric Losin have made Mezze a contrast to the airy traditional fine dining feel of Kali's. Keramidas says this time they were going for "contemporary and fun." Mezze pops with Mediterranean colors and curves that suggest sea and sand. Walls are turquoise and butterscotch.
NEWS
By Christopher Elliott | June 12, 2003
JUST AS the busy summer travel season took off this month, American Airlines announced it would scrap its roomier economy-class seats on nearly a quarter of its flights serving leisure and vacation markets. Midwest Airlines also said it would rip out its spacious seats on its new "saver" service and replace them with narrower ones. Both airlines are playing catch-up to the competition, which seems intent on squeezing the most passengers into the least amount of space. Compressing more travelers into a tiny aircraft cabin may lift the airline industry's profits in the short term, but it's a dangerous mistake with long-term implications.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | July 30, 2002
KENSINGTON - The jagged angle of the train cars, the fallen tree limbs, an ominous drop of the embankment surrounding sections of the track - all seemed to foreshadow tragedy aboard the Amtrak passenger train that derailed yesterday. But when bystanders and rescue teams reached the muddy ravine surrounding the track, they found dazed passengers who, for the most part, were able to crawl out of the cars relatively unharmed. Some cried from fear, shock or injury, but many of the passengers broke down because they were glad to be alive.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 6, 2002
SCOTTBURGH, South Africa - Just after dawn, beyond the breaking waves, the ocean blackens and bubbles like a pot of boiling oil. To the untrained eye, the dark mass chugging up this Indian Ocean shoreline could be dismissed as the shadow of a passing cloud. But to the people living along South Africa's east coast of sugarcane fields and towering beach resorts, the strange sight means only one thing: The sardines have returned. Like the swallows flying every spring to Capistrano or the monarch butterflies wintering in Mexico, millions of the slim silver fish make an annual migration to the shores of South Africa's KwaZulu-Natal province each June and July.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff Writer | August 22, 1993
Parishioners who traveled cross-country to see Pope John Paul II during World Youth Day ceremonies in Denver, which ended last week, said they returned to Carroll County inspired to spread the pontiff's teachings at home.The group from St. John Catholic Church in Westminster "really bonded and got the spirit and intent of the events," said Carolyn Legal, 20, of Sykesville."Sharing the experience is now part of our mission," she said." 'Do not be afraid of the message of the gospel and the life Christ has called you to live' was his message," said Theresa Robinson, coordinator of religious education at St. John.
FEATURES
By ALICE STEINBACH | February 9, 1992
Food, I have often observed, is a subject that interests a great many people. We spend many hours of the day thinking about food, reading about food and planning to shop for food.But the amount of time we actually spend on preparing and eating food, I have concluded, is shrinking rapidly.Yes, there may be two or three people out there who still participate in what used to be called the "dinner hour." But if you're average, or close to average, you probably are not one of them.And if you are someone I personally know, you definitely are not one of them.
FEATURES
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SUN STAFF | January 2, 2002
Wanna start a food fight? Just say "Sardines!" The little critters can spawn outsized opinions. My household may well be typical. I like them; my husband doesn't. He really doesn't - in fact, he has extracted a promise that I will eat them only when he's not in the house. That would seem to settle the matter, but recent dietary news tempts me to proselytize again, however hopeless the mission. Sardines are enjoying a new status as health food, packed with important nutrients doctors and dietitians are urging us to eat. Sardines are superb sources of protein, calcium and vitamin B-12.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | March 9, 2001
SILVER SPRING - To wedge into a rail car teeming with humanity at a Montgomery County Metro stop is to understand why state lawmakers are in a delicate position as they determine how much to cut from Gov. Parris N. Glendening's six-year, $750 million mass transit improvement proposal. Nothing captures legislators' attention like voter anger, and there is plenty of bottled-up rage in evidence among the 588,000 daily commuter-warriors who maneuver their way into Washington-area subways during rush hour in the nation's second-largest rail system (New York City's is first)
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