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By Elizabeth Gehrman and Elizabeth Gehrman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 19, 1998
Saratoga Springs, N.Y., is a sophisticated little town with a multiple personality.To history buffs, it is a key site of the American Revolution and home to some of the most elaborate Victorian architecture in the land. To those seeking a tonic for modern life, it is a resort town, famed for its healing waters. To music lovers, it is a symphony of first-rate classical, jazz, rock and folk. And to the horsey set, for six weeks every summer, it is Mecca.How did one town, on the surface nearly indistinguishable from any other in upstate New York, come to be so many things to so many people?
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SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and Baltimore Sun Media Group | May 18, 2013
A pair of racing aficionados from Saratoga Springs, N.Y., spent Saturday watching the early races at Pimlico, then they put their observations to use to score a massive payday in the Preakness. Joe Cavallo, 26, and Stephanie Rafferty, 21, hit the Pick 4 with Preakness winner Oxbow, Itsmyluckyday, Mylute, and Orb. One of their 72 50-cent Pick 4 bets netted $4,883.05, and Rafferty fought back tears as she saw the payout. “What am I going to do with $5,000?” Rafferty said. “It hasn't set in yet.” While the couple spends countless summer days at the track in Saratoga, Rafferty, who works in construction, said she only gambles on the big race days.
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TRAVEL
By Jill Schensul | August 20, 2000
You can do more in Saratoga than just horse around. Even without all the spectacle, Saratoga Springs is rife with things to do, particularly in summer. For a town of 26,000 permanent residents, it has a disproportionate number of fine restaurants and interesting diversions -- thanks to racing season. Saratogians are friendly, easygoing people, even to the tourists who clog their streets and toss out garbage (and money, don't forget). They seem to enjoy taking time to point you to a nice restaurant or give you a tip on nighttime entertainment.
NEWS
February 22, 2006
On Thursday, February 16, 2006, DONALD L., beloved father of Paige Dunkerly and her husband Aaron and Donna Bates and her husband Richard. Brother of L. Grayson Walker Jr., J. Warren Walker and Linda Evans. Also survived by five grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren. Memorial service will be held on Saturday, February 25 at 3 P. M at the Stallings Funeral Home, P.A., 3111 Mountain Road, Pasadena. Interment private. Memorial contributions to Yaddo Garden Association, POB 395, Saratoga Springs, N.Y, 12866 or Community Hospice of Saratoga, 179 Lawrence Street, Saratoga Springs, N.Y, 12866.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Kent Baker and Tom Keyser and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | October 17, 1999
Saratoga Springs romped to the most decisive victory on Maryland Million day, a 7 1/2-length score in the $100,000 Maryland Million Oaks. Her triumph prompted an emotional celebration in the winner's circle.Her former trainer, the renowned Dick Dutrow, was one of her owners along with his wife, Vicki, and friends Sondra and Howard Bender, Arlene and Herb Kushner, and Marion and Al Akman -- Marylanders all.After Dutrow died in February and his son Tony took over training, the owners changed the name of their group to Saratoga Friends Stable, reflecting their relationship with Dutrow.
NEWS
February 22, 2006
On Thursday, February 16, 2006, DONALD L., beloved father of Paige Dunkerly and her husband Aaron and Donna Bates and her husband Richard. Brother of L. Grayson Walker Jr., J. Warren Walker and Linda Evans. Also survived by five grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren. Memorial service will be held on Saturday, February 25 at 3 P. M at the Stallings Funeral Home, P.A., 3111 Mountain Road, Pasadena. Interment private. Memorial contributions to Yaddo Garden Association, POB 395, Saratoga Springs, N.Y, 12866 or Community Hospice of Saratoga, 179 Lawrence Street, Saratoga Springs, N.Y, 12866.
SPORTS
By Assoicated Press | July 30, 1994
SARATOGA SPRINGS, N.Y. -- Classy Mirage overpowered the leaders in the stretch drive and went on to a three-length victory over Spinning Round yesterday in the $81,125 Honorable Miss Stakes for older fillies and mares at Saratoga. The winner, ridden by Julie Krone, returned $4.20, $2.80 and $2.60.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Staff Writer | January 10, 1994
MILWAUKEE -- Is it the 1994 Winter Games in Lillehammer or an old-timers' reunion?The American speed skating team will have some familiar faces when the Winter Games begin in Lillehammer, Norway, in February.As expected, Dan Jansen and Bonnie Blair skated fast enough to earn positions on the 1994 team. Blair, the only U.S. woman to win gold medals in consecutive Winter Olympics, had the best times in the 500-, 1,000- and 1,500-meter races.Jansen, who has yet to win a medal in two Olympics, also earned the right to compete in the 500, 1,000 and 1,500 races.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 9, 2002
Suzanne W. Smithwick, an accomplished equestrian and teacher who enjoyed teaching the joys of horseback riding to children, died Monday of renal failure at her My Lady's Manor farm. She was 75. Born Suzanne Whitman in Baltimore, her equine interests began as a child growing up in Chattolanee Hills near Garrison, where she learned to ride and hunt foxes with the Green Spring Valley Hunt Club. A 1943 graduate of Garrison Forest School, Mrs. Smithwick studied music at Westminster Choir College in Princeton, N.J. In 1950, she married A. Patrick "Paddy" Smithwick Sr., a noted steeplechase rider.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and Baltimore Sun Media Group | May 18, 2013
A pair of racing aficionados from Saratoga Springs, N.Y., spent Saturday watching the early races at Pimlico, then they put their observations to use to score a massive payday in the Preakness. Joe Cavallo, 26, and Stephanie Rafferty, 21, hit the Pick 4 with Preakness winner Oxbow, Itsmyluckyday, Mylute, and Orb. One of their 72 50-cent Pick 4 bets netted $4,883.05, and Rafferty fought back tears as she saw the payout. “What am I going to do with $5,000?” Rafferty said. “It hasn't set in yet.” While the couple spends countless summer days at the track in Saratoga, Rafferty, who works in construction, said she only gambles on the big race days.
NEWS
By JOAN HENNESSY and JOAN HENNESSY,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 9, 2005
He was old. And stiff. And troubled by rheumatism. But in 1818, Thomas Jefferson took to the waters of Warm Springs, Va., and found the experience to his satisfaction. To this day, the springs where he bathed are called the Jefferson Pools. In those days, people didn't talk about stress management or letting go or good karma. But they believed, as many believe today, that the springs are therapeutic. When you're neck deep in steamy water, they say, a fundamental truth becomes clear: Finally, something you crave may actually be good for you. For many of us, the reasoning works.
SPORTS
By TOM KEYSER | June 15, 2003
That big inflated balloon known as Funny Cide's Triple Crown bid has begun to deflate, ever so slowly, as spring gives way to summer - and to Colonial Downs, Delaware Park, Monmouth Park and, finally, Saratoga. Funny Cide, winner of the Kentucky Derby and Preakness, is headed to the Haskell Invitational Handicap on Aug. 3 at Monmouth. Empire Maker, winner of the Belmont Stakes, is headed to the Jim Dandy Stakes the same day at Saratoga. If all goes well, they'll clash again in the Travers on Aug. 23 at Saratoga in what could be an electrifying rematch.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Kent Baker and Tom Keyser and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | May 14, 2003
Funny Cide prepared for victory in the Kentucky Derby in the relative quiet of Belmont Park in Elmont, N.Y. His final two works for the Derby were spectacular, but because they weren't at Churchill Downs, they went largely unnoticed. Yesterday, Funny Cide turned in another eye-opener, breezing four furlongs in 47.32 seconds, galloping out five furlongs in 59.20 seconds and six furlongs in 1 minute, 11.80 seconds. That was his only work between the Derby on May 3 and the Preakness on Saturday at Pimlico Race Course.
NEWS
By Kirk Johnson and Kirk Johnson,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 28, 2002
FORT EDWARD, N.Y. - A lot of people along this stretch of the Hudson River see Saratoga Springs, 10 miles west and a few dollars up on the economic scale, as a place with its nose in the air. So when word got out this spring that the federal Environmental Protection Agency had chosen Saratoga Springs for its upstate field office - the staging area for its long-delayed program to dredge the Hudson of its PCB pollution - the reaction was swift. A Fort Edward newspaper published a cartoon showing EPA workers in biohazard suits sipping champagne at a lawn party with the horse-and-pearls set. The EPA, many people said, had struck a tone-deaf note in its first decision after more than 20 years of study, revealing how little had been learned about the river and its people.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 9, 2002
Suzanne W. Smithwick, an accomplished equestrian and teacher who enjoyed teaching the joys of horseback riding to children, died Monday of renal failure at her My Lady's Manor farm. She was 75. Born Suzanne Whitman in Baltimore, her equine interests began as a child growing up in Chattolanee Hills near Garrison, where she learned to ride and hunt foxes with the Green Spring Valley Hunt Club. A 1943 graduate of Garrison Forest School, Mrs. Smithwick studied music at Westminster Choir College in Princeton, N.J. In 1950, she married A. Patrick "Paddy" Smithwick Sr., a noted steeplechase rider.
NEWS
September 11, 2000
William Foresman Shafer, 46, construction manager William Foresman Shafer, an architect who specialized in construction management and former Guilford resident, died Friday at his home in Saratoga Springs, N.Y., of skin cancer. He was 46. During the period he resided in Guilford, from 1986 to 1996, Mr. Shafer contributed to the design and construction of the physics and astronomy building at the Johns Hopkins University, and the Homer Gudelsky Building at the University of Maryland Medical Center.
NEWS
By Kirk Johnson and Kirk Johnson,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 28, 2002
FORT EDWARD, N.Y. - A lot of people along this stretch of the Hudson River see Saratoga Springs, 10 miles west and a few dollars up on the economic scale, as a place with its nose in the air. So when word got out this spring that the federal Environmental Protection Agency had chosen Saratoga Springs for its upstate field office - the staging area for its long-delayed program to dredge the Hudson of its PCB pollution - the reaction was swift. A Fort Edward newspaper published a cartoon showing EPA workers in biohazard suits sipping champagne at a lawn party with the horse-and-pearls set. The EPA, many people said, had struck a tone-deaf note in its first decision after more than 20 years of study, revealing how little had been learned about the river and its people.
NEWS
By Neal R. Peirce | October 7, 1996
FOR CIVIC REFORMERS with an aesthetic eye, people depressed by the dreary sameness of strip malls and massive sodium vapor-lighted parking lots and commercial garishness engulfing natural America, James Howard Kunstler's 1993 book "The Geography of Nowhere" was an elixir.Alternating, as one reviewer put it, "between unmitigated outrage and black humor," Kunstler gave words to many people's horror about post-World War II suburban development turned into a "tragic sprawlscape of cartoon architecture, junked cities and ravaged countryside."
TRAVEL
By Jill Schensul | August 20, 2000
You can do more in Saratoga than just horse around. Even without all the spectacle, Saratoga Springs is rife with things to do, particularly in summer. For a town of 26,000 permanent residents, it has a disproportionate number of fine restaurants and interesting diversions -- thanks to racing season. Saratogians are friendly, easygoing people, even to the tourists who clog their streets and toss out garbage (and money, don't forget). They seem to enjoy taking time to point you to a nice restaurant or give you a tip on nighttime entertainment.
TRAVEL
By JILL SCHENSUL and JILL SCHENSUL,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 20, 2000
The horse stamps his hoof. The jockey stretches in his saddle. The woman with the Coast- of-Somewhere tan pouts with fire-red lips. A bugle sounds. Gates drop. Hoofs pound. They're off -- horse, rider and aristocrat -- for yet another season of thoroughbred racing in Saratoga Springs, N.Y., a fast-paced, prestige-soaked ritual that's been performed for almost 140 years. Every summer, the unassuming little upstate New York town bursts forth in equine splendor. The shops are crammed with race-related baubles, the restaurants swell with patrons flashing Gold Cards, the hotels teem with cigar-smoking old chaps buying rounds of overpriced drinks.
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