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NEWS
November 22, 1992
Following is the text of a letter sent Nov. 15 from Dimitrij Rupel, foreign minister of Slovenia, to Dobrica Cosic, president of Yugoslavia, as provided by the Slovenian embassy in Washington.Dear Dobrica!Last night I came back from Sarajevo. I was trying to arrange for safe return of the Slovenes remaining there. . . . I want this evacuation to succeed, therefore I'm asking You for help.While I was arranging for the Slovenes to leave, I perceived som other sights of Sarajevo and of the war in Bosnia and Herzegovina.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2012
Dr. Zlatko Tesanovic, a Johns Hopkins University physics professor who advised his visiting academic colleagues where they should eat in Baltimore, died of an apparent heart attack July 26 at the George Washington University Hospital in Washington, D.C., after collapsing at Reagan National Airport. The Canton resident was 55. Born in Sarajevo in what was then Yugoslavia, he earned his undergraduate degree in physics in 1979 from the University of Sarajevo. He then received a Fulbright Fellowship and attended the University of Minnesota, where he earned a doctorate in physics in 1985.
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NEWS
February 23, 1994
SARAJEVO EXODUS -- Four centuries ago, Sarajevo accepted Jews fleeing the Spanish Inquisition, and they lived happily in the city until the Nazis came during World War II. But even after the Holocaust, a Jewish community remained in the Bosnian capital.After the siege of Sarajevo began 23 months ago, the Joint Jewish Distribution Committee worked to get many Jews who remained out of the city to safety in Israel or elsewhere. Most of the 1,200 Jews who lived in Sarajevo have now been evacuated.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2012
The report from the State Department was brief: Thomas M. Jennings Jr., a federal worker from Burtonsville on a temporary assignment with NATO peacekeepers, had died in a car crash in Southern Bosnia. Fifteen years later, it turns out that was only part of the story. Unknown to neighbors and friends, Jennings was working for the CIA, the agency acknowledged last week. A veteran covert officer — he told acquaintances he worked for the State Department — he volunteered to go to Sarajevo after the Bosnian war as a U.S.-led force worked to maintain peace.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | March 6, 2012
"The Cellist of Sarajevo" is the pick for the 2012 One Maryland One Book program , organizers have announced. Steven Galloway's novel is built around an actual event: a cellist's street performance to memorialize bombing deaths in the war-torn city. Galloway uses the impressions of three fictional characters to describe the siege of the city in the wake of Yugoslavia's disintegration.  His war is experienced on a human scale -- as Galloway examines the feelings of residents who live with the fear of random death every day. They try to maintain a grasp on their pre-war lives as they scramble for water and other necessities that are fast disappearing.
NEWS
By A. M. Rosenthal | December 2, 1992
Sarajevo, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- BUT if the water is cut fo days and weeks, how do you get some to drink and wash? Does your wife have to go out and stand at a tap?For a moment I thought that the Bosnian official driving us through the streets while we crouched low against the snipers had not heard. But he had.He replied in sentences with such long pauses between them that they seemed almost different conversations."No. She does not. She does not go out. She is dead. Fifty-seven days, killed by a shell.
NEWS
June 30, 1992
International resolve, symbolized by French President Francois Mitterrand's personal visit, appears to have opened Sarajevo Airport for relief missions bringing food and medicine to the beleaguered people of that Bosnian capital.With United Nations blue helmets from Canada in action, there is a risk of conflict with regular Serbian forces. The likelihood, however, is that the tripwire show of force will intimidate the Yugoslavian army and Serbian irregulars from firing. If they do fire, the allies had better be prepared for contingencies involving air power to protect the airlift.
NEWS
May 12, 1992
,TC The mighty Yugoslav army, which the United States helped to build into a counter-force to Soviet militarization of Eastern Europe, has found its true foe: Yugoslavians. The unending shelling of Sarajevo is one of the great atrocities of the age, ranking with Saddam Hussein's war on the Kurds.According to Borba, the independent newspaper in Serbian Belgrade, Serb militiamen allied to the Yugoslav army are "systematically murdering Sarajevo." This is the Muslim city from which Yugoslavia proudly hosted the 1984 Winter Olympics to symbolize peace and show off the mountains of Bosnia-Herzegovina.
NEWS
February 22, 1994
Quite by happenstance, often improvising as they went along, the major powers have chanced upon a formula that may, at last, reduce the misery and mayhem in Bosnia. A combination of American power and Russian intervention -- both applied at crucial moments -- has lifted the siege of Sarajevo by Serb forces and could be equally effective in relieving Muslim enclaves elsewhere.Today top officials of the United Nations, the European Union, Russia and the United States will meet in Bonn to decide what comes next.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | June 17, 1992
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- Little in this bombed-out, besieged city functions, little, that is, but the Klas bakery.This is not a time for cakes and pastry. A starving city needs bread, and the Klas bakery, the only industrial one still operating, yesterday turned out 70,000 loaves to feed 300,000 people cut off from the outside world for 10 weeks.Sarajevo is without fresh meat, fruit or vegetables, so people are dependent on the Klas bread factory to survive."We will do whatever it takes to get bread to these people.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | March 6, 2012
"The Cellist of Sarajevo" is the pick for the 2012 One Maryland One Book program , organizers have announced. Steven Galloway's novel is built around an actual event: a cellist's street performance to memorialize bombing deaths in the war-torn city. Galloway uses the impressions of three fictional characters to describe the siege of the city in the wake of Yugoslavia's disintegration.  His war is experienced on a human scale -- as Galloway examines the feelings of residents who live with the fear of random death every day. They try to maintain a grasp on their pre-war lives as they scramble for water and other necessities that are fast disappearing.
SPORTS
By Jakob Engelke | July 21, 2011
Pe'Shon Howard isn't the only Maryland men's basketball player who has been turning heads this summer. Howard became an Internet sensation this past week and even earned some airtime on ESPN's "SportsNation" Tuesday thanks to a highlight reel of his play in Washington's famed Goodman League . But another Terp -- forward Haukur Palsson -- has been quietly putting up some big numbers this summer, albeit not in the U.S. Palsson is currently...
NEWS
March 14, 2006
If the world is in fact witnessing a clash of civilizations between Islam and the West, it's worth remembering that one of the most significant blows was struck in the 1990s by Slobodan Milosevic as he whipped up Serbian wars against Bosnian Muslims and Kosovar Albanians. His legacy was a poisonous one that had ramifications far beyond the borders of even the old Yugoslavia - which is why it was so much in the interests of the international community to see him receive justice at the tribunal in The Hague.
NEWS
August 8, 2004
Board of Education to meet Wednesday The Carroll County Board of Education will hold its monthly meeting at 5 p.m. Wednesday in Room 007 of the board offices, 125 N. Court St., Westminster. The regular meeting agenda will be posted on the school system's Web site: www.carrollk12. org. Meetings will be broadcast live on CETV, Channel 21 on Adelphia cable TV, and repeated at 8 p.m. Thursday, Sunday and Aug. 19, and 9 a.m. Saturday. Information: 410-751-3020. Meeting set on preschool and special education The Department of Special Education for Carroll County Public Schools will hold a Special Education Preschool meeting from 10 a.m. to noon Wednesday.
TOPIC
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 20, 2002
Shot on the way to market. Shot on the way to school. Shot during a walk in the park. What was once true in Sarajevo now prevails in Falls Church or Silver Spring. Sniper Alley, it seems, now roughly follows the path of the Capital Beltway, where in parking lots and at gas stations suburbanites more accustomed to worrying about crabgrass and gridlock are now contemplating the best ways to make themselves less inviting targets. Will crouching at the gas pump help? When waiting on a Metro platform, is it best to take shelter or to keep moving?
NEWS
By Rosemary Armao and Rosemary Armao,SUN STAFF | August 23, 1999
SARAJEVO -- In a city where bad memories are no further away than the gravestones in the parks and red "Sarajevo Roses" mark where sniper bullets dropped people to the sidewalks, residents remember the 1984 Winter Olympics as a wondrous period of festivity and peace.They remember it as a time when the world's spotlight trained on Yugoslavia for reasons that had nothing to do with ethnic hatred or war.They want to bring back the games.Unlikely as that might seem, former Yugoslav President Bogic Bogicevic heads a planning committee writing a proposal to the International Olympic Committee to bring the winter 2010 games to this central Bosnian city of 400,000.
NEWS
By Peter S. Green and Peter S. Green,Contributing Writer | December 26, 1993
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- On that Monday, Narcisa Kevcija swung her ax for the last time.The last wooden guardrail was gone from the small footbridge over Sarajevo's Miljacka River, and Ms. Kevcija, a 21-year-old veteran of the Bosnian War and the widowed mother of TC 3-month-old girl, would have to look elsewhere for wood to heat the three small, damp rooms of her Sarajevo apartment.There's no electricity in her apartment because someone stole the cooling oil from the neighborhood's transformer, and despite a line of narrow ditches up and down her street, gas lines have yet to be installed.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1998
Cardinal Vinko Puljic, Archbishop of Sarajevo, stood in simple green vestments before a noontime congregation yesterday at St. Ignatius Church and quietly but pointedly told of the horror of war that has brought unspeakable tragedy to his country.Puljic, a pilgrim of peace from Bosnia who is in Baltimore to advocate ethnic and religious cooperation, spoke at the Calvert Street church of a grenade that exploded in a Sarajevo marketplace, killing and maiming dozens, and of one little girl whose leg was blown off."
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 27, 1998
From its opening sequence, featuring 1970s-style titles over a vivid montage set to Van Morrison singing "the way young lovers do," "Welcome to Sarajevo" carries viewers through its powerful story on a surge of urgency, polemic and adrenalin.Calling on a grand cinematic tradition of war pictures, director Michael Winterbottom has created an extraordinary glimpse of the war in the former Yugoslavia. Even more admirable, the movie transcends political concerns to become a portrait of a man facing his moment of truth.
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