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By Chris Kaltenbach | August 10, 2005
Celebrity watcher alert: Irrepressible fashion plate Sarah Jessica Parker will be sporting her Manolo Blahnik footwear in Annapolis this week. Parker, late of HBO's Sex and the City series, will be filming a scene for her next movie, Failure to Launch, on State Circle either tomorrow or Friday, says the film's publicist, Carol McConnaughey. In the scene, Parker will walk from Paws Pet Boutique toward Harry Brown's restaurant when she stops to speak with a friend. Filming will take most of the day, and the decision to shoot tomorrow or Friday depends on the weather, McConnaughey says.
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By Deborah Stone and Deborah Stone,Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2009
Picture this. It's 7 a.m. on a weekday. You're in formalwear. You drive into downtown Baltimore and board a bus with other people in gowns and black tie. You look like leftovers from an all-night bash, but nothing could be further from the truth. You are, in fact, a bus full of television extras. That's the kind of thing that happens when Hollywood comes to Charm City. Executive producer Sarah Jessica Parker was in Baltimore filming scenes for the pilot of a new show called The Washingtonienne.
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By Abigail Tucker and Abigail Tucker,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2005
Carole Duley's binoculars trembled a bit as she perched on a bench on the State House lawn, scanning the movie set below, where Matthew McConaughey was possibly - please God! - camped out. But even before the cameras got rolling yesterday morning, she had a hunch her hunk wouldn't show. "I heard he's in Easton," she muttered. "I don't know what Easton has that Annapolis doesn't. "He could have stayed right here the whole time," the Annapolis retiree said. "We could have had a nice cold drink down by the bay."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | November 2, 2008
First it was drugs, crime and corruption, now it's sex. TV and Baltimore sure make for an interesting mix. A year after The Wire stopped filming here, the pilot for another HBO television series, this one based on a book by D.C. sex blogger Jessica Cutler and executive-produced by Sarah Jessica Parker, began shooting in Baltimore yesterday. Parker, who spent several days in Baltimore and Annapolis shooting scenes for her 2006 comedy Failure to Launch, said the pilot will be filmed here largely because of Charm City's proximity to Washington, where the pilot is set. "HBO has a nice history of shooting in Baltimore, for a variety of reasons," she said.
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By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 16, 2005
In the home-for-the-holidays comedy-drama The Family Stone, the talented and quirky-pretty Sarah Jessica Parker gives an excruciating performance. It's a keenly self-conscious caricature - the bold, showy kind that often wins awards yet sends audiences running from the theater. (She has just been nominated for a Golden Globe.) Playing an uptight New York businesswoman for writer-director Thomas Bezucha, Parker obliterates any vestige of her natural warmth and whimsy. This woman doesn't know how to be herself.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2001
Sarah: My one and HBOnly By Tamara Ikenberg SPECIAL TO THE SUN I have about the same chance of getting tickets for "The Producers" as I do of stealing Matthew Broderick from Sarah Jessica Parker. And that's just one of the reasons why I'm tuning in and turning on to HBO's "Sex and the City" tonight instead of the Tonys on CBS. Call it "Producers" envy. Call it lack of culture. Call it a preference for watching four female carnivores carnally conquering New York instead of a bunch of sissies breaking into song.
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 19, 2006
NEW YORK - Stick Sarah Jessica Parker in a room filled with reporters, all men, and the first question they ask isn't about co-starring alongside Matthew McConaughey in her new film, or her marriage to actor Matthew Broderick, or her six years starring in HBO's Sex and the City, or the Golden Globes and Emmys she's won, or even her three decades in showbiz. No, what these guys want to know is: "Who designed your outfit?" "Oh, thank you," gushes Parker, either grateful for the attention or -- more likely -- glad to get the obvious question out of the way first.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2005
Fragrance is a necessity on days you don't have time to shower. -- Actress Sarah Jessica Parker, who is developing her own fragrance, presumably not from ceasing to shower
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 10, 2006
Matthew McConaughey is handsome and easygoing. Sarah Jessica Parker is adorable and hard-to-resist. Failure to Launch, a romantic comedy that, in spite of its title, has nothing to do with rockets, uses those personas to full advantage. There's comfort in seeing actors we know doing what we've come to expect them to do. But more important, the film surrounds them with supporting characters who are less familiar to us, who act in ways we don't expect. The result is a satisfying blend that goes down nice and easy.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | May 30, 2008
Since it clocks in at almost 2 1/2 hours, you may think, sight unseen, that the movie version of the HBO smash Sex and the City is guilty of wretched excess. Pathetic excess is more like it. This time out, we get a lot of moping, whining and weeping - despondency in the city and inertia everywhere else. Even when the heroines log major screen time at a five-star Mexican resort, it's so Carrie Bradshaw (Sarah Jessica Parker) can lick her psychic wounds. Fans who came on board for the series' frisky take on sorority, female eroticism and the adventures of singlehood - be forewarned.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | May 30, 2008
Since it clocks in at almost 2 1/2 hours, you may think, sight unseen, that the movie version of the HBO smash Sex and the City is guilty of wretched excess. Pathetic excess is more like it. This time out, we get a lot of moping, whining and weeping - despondency in the city and inertia everywhere else. Even when the heroines log major screen time at a five-star Mexican resort, it's so Carrie Bradshaw (Sarah Jessica Parker) can lick her psychic wounds. Fans who came on board for the series' frisky take on sorority, female eroticism and the adventures of singlehood - be forewarned.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | April 11, 2008
A third of the way through Smart People, I channeled Randy Newman's "Short People" and thought, "Smart people got no reason to live." In this sometimes droll but often just pleasantly literate movie, screenwriter Mark Jude Poirier's smart people -- depressed English prof Lawrence Wetherhold (Dennis Quaid) and his go-getter daughter Vanessa (Ellen Page) -- walk around Pittsburgh and the campus of Carnegie-Mellon "tellin' great big lies" like Newman's short ones, albeit mostly to themselves.
FEATURES
March 13, 2006
LOS ANGELES -- Failure to Launch, a romantic comedy starring Matthew McConaughey and Sarah Jessica Parker, took off at theaters, debuting as the top weekend movie with $24.6 million. Remakes opened in second and third place. Disney's family flick The Shaggy Dog, starring Tim Allen, was No. 2 with $16 million, and Fox Searchlight's horror tale The Hills Have Eyes was No. 3 with $15.5 million, according to studio estimates yesterday. Reviews generally were poor for all three new films, but they overcame the weak critical reception to combine for a healthy $56.1 million.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 10, 2006
Matthew McConaughey is handsome and easygoing. Sarah Jessica Parker is adorable and hard-to-resist. Failure to Launch, a romantic comedy that, in spite of its title, has nothing to do with rockets, uses those personas to full advantage. There's comfort in seeing actors we know doing what we've come to expect them to do. But more important, the film surrounds them with supporting characters who are less familiar to us, who act in ways we don't expect. The result is a satisfying blend that goes down nice and easy.
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 19, 2006
NEW YORK - Stick Sarah Jessica Parker in a room filled with reporters, all men, and the first question they ask isn't about co-starring alongside Matthew McConaughey in her new film, or her marriage to actor Matthew Broderick, or her six years starring in HBO's Sex and the City, or the Golden Globes and Emmys she's won, or even her three decades in showbiz. No, what these guys want to know is: "Who designed your outfit?" "Oh, thank you," gushes Parker, either grateful for the attention or -- more likely -- glad to get the obvious question out of the way first.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 16, 2005
In the home-for-the-holidays comedy-drama The Family Stone, the talented and quirky-pretty Sarah Jessica Parker gives an excruciating performance. It's a keenly self-conscious caricature - the bold, showy kind that often wins awards yet sends audiences running from the theater. (She has just been nominated for a Golden Globe.) Playing an uptight New York businesswoman for writer-director Thomas Bezucha, Parker obliterates any vestige of her natural warmth and whimsy. This woman doesn't know how to be herself.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | April 11, 2008
A third of the way through Smart People, I channeled Randy Newman's "Short People" and thought, "Smart people got no reason to live." In this sometimes droll but often just pleasantly literate movie, screenwriter Mark Jude Poirier's smart people -- depressed English prof Lawrence Wetherhold (Dennis Quaid) and his go-getter daughter Vanessa (Ellen Page) -- walk around Pittsburgh and the campus of Carnegie-Mellon "tellin' great big lies" like Newman's short ones, albeit mostly to themselves.
FEATURES
March 13, 2006
LOS ANGELES -- Failure to Launch, a romantic comedy starring Matthew McConaughey and Sarah Jessica Parker, took off at theaters, debuting as the top weekend movie with $24.6 million. Remakes opened in second and third place. Disney's family flick The Shaggy Dog, starring Tim Allen, was No. 2 with $16 million, and Fox Searchlight's horror tale The Hills Have Eyes was No. 3 with $15.5 million, according to studio estimates yesterday. Reviews generally were poor for all three new films, but they overcame the weak critical reception to combine for a healthy $56.1 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 2005
LOOK FOR FULL REVIEWS IN TOMORROW'S MOVIES TODAY SECTION Cheaper by the Dozen 2 In a sequel to a remake, Steve Martin and Bonnie Hunt are back as the parents of a 12-member brood, this time butting heads with a family of eight headed by Eugene Levy. PG. Opens Wednesday. The Family Stone Diane Keaton, Craig T. Nelson, Luke Wilson, Sarah Jessica Parker, Dermot Mulroney, Rachel McAdams, Claire Danes and probably a few other big names we forgot to mention star in this comedy about a bride-to-be (Parker)
FEATURES
By Abigail Tucker and Abigail Tucker,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2005
Carole Duley's binoculars trembled a bit as she perched on a bench on the State House lawn, scanning the movie set below, where Matthew McConaughey was possibly - please God! - camped out. But even before the cameras got rolling yesterday morning, she had a hunch her hunk wouldn't show. "I heard he's in Easton," she muttered. "I don't know what Easton has that Annapolis doesn't. "He could have stayed right here the whole time," the Annapolis retiree said. "We could have had a nice cold drink down by the bay."
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