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By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | January 6, 2005
Until recently, Sarah Hughes had never been swept off her feet, at least not as a figure skater. But the 2002 Olympic gold medalist blushes and hides a sheepish smile behind her hand as she describes skating with a partner in her first season with the Stars on Ice tour. "I've never been lifted before. This is my first time," says Hughes, dissolving from young adult to giddy teen. "You know the guys are very good-looking in this show. And I step out on the ice and get to skate with the guys.
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By Glenn Graham, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2013
The Perry Hall softball team takes pride in the details. The No. 4 Gators appreciate a sacrifice bunt as much as a big hit. They make sure to get the lead runner, make opponents go station to station to try to bring home a run and have found a knack for getting the big outs. Veteran coach Brian Radcliffe, in his 18th season, urges his players to be "brilliant at the basics. " With No. 7 Mount de Sales visiting on Wednesday, the Gators practiced what Radcliffe has been preaching with a 7-2 win over the Sailors.
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SPORTS
By RICK MAESE and RICK MAESE,SUN REPORTER | February 18, 2006
TURIN, Italy -- The mistake happened just once, but that's all it really took to remember just who is casting that large shadow. At a news conference yesterday, a radio reporter took the microphone and started to pose his question. "Sarah ... " he began. Up on the dais, he was quickly corrected. "I'm Emily," the small girl with the big smile politely said. Emily Hughes is alternately known as Sarah's Sister and more recently, Michelle's Replacement. She met with the media yesterday for the first time since arriving in Italy the day before.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2012
Kenneth O'Donnell, aide to President John F. Kennedy, stepped into a small cubicle at Parkland Hospital, where Vice President Lyndon Baines Johnson nervously waited with his wife and several aides to learn the condition of the president. Kennedy had been shot as his motorcade made its way through downtown Dallas on a sun-splashed November autumn afternoon. "He's gone," O'Donnell said to Johnson, who through an assassin's hand had become the 36th president of the United States. It was 1:30 p.m. Central Standard Time, Nov. 22, 1963.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | March 4, 2005
KITCHENER, Ontario - Too young to compete in next year's Winter Olympics, Mao Asada made the Junior World Figure Skating Championships her international stage. Asada, 14, was a clean, serene jumping machine as she nonchalantly landed one element after another - including a triple axel - to easily win the gold medal last night with an elegant performance that brought the audience to its feet. Bel Air's Kimmie Meissner, the defending silver medalist who entered the free skate in third place, self-destructed in the final 90 seconds of her program and dropped to fourth.
SPORTS
By THE PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER | February 23, 2002
SALT LAKE CITY - The long list of questions about figure skating judging got a little bit longer Thursday night when Sarah Hughes came from fourth place after the short program to win the gold medal. Here are a few questions you might have: How did Hughes win exactly? Why was Michelle Kwan in first place overall on the scoreboard, ahead of Hughes after she skated but in third place, behind Hughes, after Irina Slutskaya skated? What is factored placing? Why did Slutskaya choose that dress?
NEWS
By RICK MAESE | February 21, 2006
TURIN, Italy-- --The stars have fallen from the Olympic sky. By now you know the names: Michelle Kwan, Bode Miller, Johnny Weir, Apolo Ohno. Total medal count: one bronze among them. The skiers, the curlers and the hockey puck hurlers, one by one they've found disappointment at these Winter Games. There's one last big name set to make her debut tonight - figure skater Sasha Cohen - and one American underdog quietly waiting in the shadows. Kimmie Meissner, the youngest member of Team USA, sure seems like a big deal around Maryland, doesn't she?
SPORTS
By THE RECORD (HACKENSACK, N.J.) | March 19, 2001
HACKENSACK, N.J. - It's about a 90-minute drive between Great Neck (N.Y.) North High School and The Ice House, time for Sarah Hughes to catch up on her math homework, listen to some 'N Sync, and talk with her coach, Robin Wagner, about her latest lipstick color. But when Wagner's Ford Explorer pulls into the parking lot, all the chitchat about boys and Britney Spears' new video ceases and out steps a girl showing serious determination and dedication. Hughes spends two hours a day, six days a week at The Ice House, pressing forward in her dream of becoming the best woman figure skater in the world.
SPORTS
By Glenn Graham, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2013
The Perry Hall softball team takes pride in the details. The No. 4 Gators appreciate a sacrifice bunt as much as a big hit. They make sure to get the lead runner, make opponents go station to station to try to bring home a run and have found a knack for getting the big outs. Veteran coach Brian Radcliffe, in his 18th season, urges his players to be "brilliant at the basics. " With No. 7 Mount de Sales visiting on Wednesday, the Gators practiced what Radcliffe has been preaching with a 7-2 win over the Sailors.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | February 23, 2002
SALT LAKE CITY -- The T-shirt is worn and faded, but to Sarah Hughes, it's sacred. For as long as she can remember, every night before a big competition, Hughes has worn it to bed. On the front is a picture of Peggy Fleming, which Hughes admits has seen better days. Earlier this year, Fleming heard about the T-shirt at the U.S. national championships and had another one made for Hughes. The 16-year-old politely accepted, then quietly squirreled it away in a drawer. "I wanted to stick with the old pajamas I'd been wearing," Hughes said.
NEWS
By RICK MAESE | February 21, 2006
TURIN, Italy-- --The stars have fallen from the Olympic sky. By now you know the names: Michelle Kwan, Bode Miller, Johnny Weir, Apolo Ohno. Total medal count: one bronze among them. The skiers, the curlers and the hockey puck hurlers, one by one they've found disappointment at these Winter Games. There's one last big name set to make her debut tonight - figure skater Sasha Cohen - and one American underdog quietly waiting in the shadows. Kimmie Meissner, the youngest member of Team USA, sure seems like a big deal around Maryland, doesn't she?
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE and RICK MAESE,SUN REPORTER | February 18, 2006
TURIN, Italy -- The mistake happened just once, but that's all it really took to remember just who is casting that large shadow. At a news conference yesterday, a radio reporter took the microphone and started to pose his question. "Sarah ... " he began. Up on the dais, he was quickly corrected. "I'm Emily," the small girl with the big smile politely said. Emily Hughes is alternately known as Sarah's Sister and more recently, Michelle's Replacement. She met with the media yesterday for the first time since arriving in Italy the day before.
SPORTS
By SHAUN POWELL and SHAUN POWELL,NEWSDAY | February 16, 2006
TURIN, Italy -- She's her inspiration, her role model, her soft shoulder in sad moments, her dry hanky in happy moments. Basically, Sarah Hughes is Emily's sister. And sisters are always there for each other. It's not usually this smooth with kid combinations. For example, brother and brother have this understanding: The oldest will pick on the youngest, starting at birth. The poor little guy will get his ear flicked, or experience the annoyance of a well-applied noogie, or always feel pressure to catch his big brother's baseball throw, which always comes too hard.
SPORTS
By GEORGE DIAZ and GEORGE DIAZ,ORLANDO SENTINEL | February 14, 2006
TURIN, Italy -- The history of pairs figure skating would skew a little something like this if this were corporate America: Individual skaters get all the money the boss has to offer. Pairs get a nice fruitcake for Christmas. A seventh-place finish by Rena Inoue and John Baldwin of Santa Monica, Calif., in the pairs final at the Palavela last evening reflects the U.S. struggles to keep up with Russia, China and other countries whose system allows much more time to establish continuity.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | January 3, 2006
The Olympic gold medal in women's figure skating won't shine quite as brightly this year in Turin. Sure, the classy Irina Slutskaya deserves to feel the ribbon around her neck as she stands on top of the podium next month. And maybe the always-a-bridesmaid Sasha Cohen will add another silver to her collection. But the most-watched event at the Winter Games won't have the world's hottest figure skater on the ice. Without Mao Asada, the competition will have all the punch of a 40-watt bulb in Yankee Stadium.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | March 4, 2005
KITCHENER, Ontario - Too young to compete in next year's Winter Olympics, Mao Asada made the Junior World Figure Skating Championships her international stage. Asada, 14, was a clean, serene jumping machine as she nonchalantly landed one element after another - including a triple axel - to easily win the gold medal last night with an elegant performance that brought the audience to its feet. Bel Air's Kimmie Meissner, the defending silver medalist who entered the free skate in third place, self-destructed in the final 90 seconds of her program and dropped to fourth.
SPORTS
By GEORGE DIAZ and GEORGE DIAZ,ORLANDO SENTINEL | February 14, 2006
TURIN, Italy -- The history of pairs figure skating would skew a little something like this if this were corporate America: Individual skaters get all the money the boss has to offer. Pairs get a nice fruitcake for Christmas. A seventh-place finish by Rena Inoue and John Baldwin of Santa Monica, Calif., in the pairs final at the Palavela last evening reflects the U.S. struggles to keep up with Russia, China and other countries whose system allows much more time to establish continuity.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | January 3, 2006
The Olympic gold medal in women's figure skating won't shine quite as brightly this year in Turin. Sure, the classy Irina Slutskaya deserves to feel the ribbon around her neck as she stands on top of the podium next month. And maybe the always-a-bridesmaid Sasha Cohen will add another silver to her collection. But the most-watched event at the Winter Games won't have the world's hottest figure skater on the ice. Without Mao Asada, the competition will have all the punch of a 40-watt bulb in Yankee Stadium.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | January 6, 2005
Until recently, Sarah Hughes had never been swept off her feet, at least not as a figure skater. But the 2002 Olympic gold medalist blushes and hides a sheepish smile behind her hand as she describes skating with a partner in her first season with the Stars on Ice tour. "I've never been lifted before. This is my first time," says Hughes, dissolving from young adult to giddy teen. "You know the guys are very good-looking in this show. And I step out on the ice and get to skate with the guys.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | February 23, 2002
SALT LAKE CITY -- The T-shirt is worn and faded, but to Sarah Hughes, it's sacred. For as long as she can remember, every night before a big competition, Hughes has worn it to bed. On the front is a picture of Peggy Fleming, which Hughes admits has seen better days. Earlier this year, Fleming heard about the T-shirt at the U.S. national championships and had another one made for Hughes. The 16-year-old politely accepted, then quietly squirreled it away in a drawer. "I wanted to stick with the old pajamas I'd been wearing," Hughes said.
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