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By Mary Carole McCauley and The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2014
In the spring of 1981, when Marion Rodgers was a senior at Goucher College, she nearly fell on top of a box of old papers that would change her life. Rodgers was preparing an article for the student newspaper paper on a former author and Goucher professor named Sara Haardt - who later married the iconoclastic journalist H.L. Mencken. "I was putting away one of her scrapbooks in the vault of the library's rare book room when I literally stumbled over a box that was lying on the floor next to a shelf," said Rodgers, now a resident of Washington, D.C. "Taped on the top of the box was a message that basically said, 'Do not open until 1981.
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By Mary Carole McCauley and The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2014
In the spring of 1981, when Marion Rodgers was a senior at Goucher College, she nearly fell on top of a box of old papers that would change her life. Rodgers was preparing an article for the student newspaper paper on a former author and Goucher professor named Sara Haardt - who later married the iconoclastic journalist H.L. Mencken. "I was putting away one of her scrapbooks in the vault of the library's rare book room when I literally stumbled over a box that was lying on the floor next to a shelf," said Rodgers, now a resident of Washington, D.C. "Taped on the top of the box was a message that basically said, 'Do not open until 1981.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | September 11, 2004
On a gloomy spring morning more than 20 years ago, I was given a tour of 704 Cathedral St., once the home of H.L. Mencken and his wife, Sara Powell Haardt, who spent their brief married lives there in the early 1930s. At the time of my tour, the large brownstone townhouse, built in 1850, was owned by Laurence Glass. He later sold it to the city for $400,000; it will become a major component in the expansion and renovation of the Baltimore School for the Arts. The first-floor entry hall was illuminated by light from an oval-shaped transom.
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By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 13, 1995
Rosslyn, Va -- In one of the small, sad ironies of the week in which The Evening Sun limped toward oblivion, the 115th birthday of H. L. Mencken went all but unnoticed in the newspaper he made famous and graced with his incandescent wit and writing.He got a two-line notice in the Almanac on Page 2D of yesterday's editions of the hometown paper he nurtured and guided to what a Mencken scholar here called "independence, talent and mostly courage."It fell to Marion Elizabeth Rodgers, 36, to celebrate The Bad Boy of Baltimore on his birthday yesterday and in passing mourn the demise of The Evening Sun."
NEWS
February 19, 1997
Paul J. Kilduff, 74, owned tread repair firmPaul J. Kilduff, who had owned a company that repaired the heavy metal treads of bulldozers and similar vehicles, died of a brain tumor Sunday at his Bel Air home. He was 74.Mr. Kilduff, who was known as Duffy, was the owner of Sav-A-Roll Inc., a business he purchased in 1968 and moved from Virginia to Capitol Heights."The undercarriage repair business, in addition to replacing treads, also handles drive-train repairs and the replacement of rollers and sprockets," said a son, Gregory M. Kilduff of Kingsville.
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By Karin Remesch | November 12, 1998
'The Gin Game'Witness the rivalry and budding romance between two stubborn retirees when the Pulitzer Prize-winning comedy "The Gin Game" is presented at the Mechanic Theatre, 25 Hopkins Plaza, Tuesday through Nov. 22. Portrayed by Tony Award winner Julie Harris and Tony and Golden Globe winner Charles Durning, the couple breaks through loneliness over a tumultuous series of gin games and forges a loving, if raucous, friendship. Hours are 8 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday and 3 p.m. Sunday.
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By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | September 13, 1997
So on the great man's birthday, when you call the Alfred A. Knopf publishing company to check which of H. L. Mencken's books are in print, the voice on the phone replies: "Is that Winnie the Pooh?"Well, no. H. L. Mencken was perhaps the finest American prose stylist of this waning 20th century, and certainly one of its most vituperative. The author of "The House at Pooh Corner," a work of art which Dorothy Parker reviewed with the immortal words "Tonstant Weader Fwowed Up," was A.A. Milne.
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By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | May 26, 1996
Baltimore is elegantly adorned with scholarly experts on the life and works of H.L. Mencken, plus a generous tribe of well-versed Mencken chatterers. All will have something to say about "In Defense of Marion, The Love Letters of Marion Bloom & H.L. Mencken," edited by Edward A. Martin. (University of Georgia Press. 390 pages. $65).Who was this Mencken? Born in 1880 in Baltimore, where he was debilitated by a stroke in 1948 and died in 1956, he was for 30 years or more the most famous journalist and the most provocative social, cultural and literary critic in America.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | September 14, 2002
If H.L. Mencken, whose 122nd birthday was on Thursday, returned from the grave to his beloved Baltimore, he'd be saddened to learn that most of his favorite restaurants and watering holes are no more. For Mencken pilgrims in search of a German restaurant where the "Sage of Baltimore" put away stunningly cold seidels of German beer while devouring plates of sauerbraten served with red cabbage and kartoffel klosse, it will be a frustrating trek. There is no such place any longer. What's left, in some cases, are only facades such as the old Junker Hotel on Fayette Street or Haussner's sprawling complex in Highlandtown, which brought down the curtain on Baltimore's Teutonic gourmet legacy when it closed in 1999.
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By Karin Remesch | February 11, 1999
AROUND THE HARBORWedding on iceThe honor of your presence is requested at the marriage ceremony of more than 40 couples when the Inner Harbor Ice Rink on Rash Field transforms into a huge wedding chapel on Valentine's Day. Couples will don ice skates to marry or renew their vows in a non-denominational ceremony at the third annual WLIF-FM Wedding on Ice at 10 a.m. Sunday. Afterward, a wedding reception will be held inside the warming tent. Couples must register in advance and have a marriage license; admission is free for spectators.
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By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | November 7, 2001
"A home is not a mere transient shelter ... It is at once a refuge from the world, a treasure-house, a castle, and a shrine of a whole hierarchy of peculiarly private and potent gods." When H.L. Mencken wrote that paean to home in the Evening Sun on Feb. 16, 1925, he had lived in the same house at 1524 Hollins St. for about 42 years. Mencken, who many consider the finest American prose stylist of modern times, died in that house almost 31 years later. He was 75, and except for not quite five years when he was married to Sara Haardt, he had lived in the house on the north side of Union Square from when he was about 3 years old. The house is empty now and worn and neglected.
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