Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSantoni
IN THE NEWS

Santoni

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 16, 2013
I am no economist but I fail to see why the bottle tax has been so disastrous to Santoni's Supermarket in Highlandtown while apparently sparing other city markets ( "Santoni's closing Highlandtown store," Oct. 13). (Make no mistake: My mobile friends loved Santoni's. Being on the less mobile side, I walk to Fresh and Green's when I need produce.) I have to ask if it could it possibly be that Santoni's has been charging more than its competitors for sodas and other items, leaving Mrs. Raven and Miss Oriole to load up on Santoni's hand-butchered meat and great pies and then, on the way home, swing by Safeway to fill up the car trunk with 7Up, Pepsi and the like - all on sale or cheaper, tax or no tax. And, yes, I am cynical, but did Santoni's lose money by giving transportation to low-income residents of city "food deserts" who wanted to peruse his expensive soda stocks?
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | January 28, 2014
Gmart International Foods, a five-store supermarket chain with two Maryland locations, will open in the next 60 days in the former Santoni's Super Market site in Highlandtown, the shopping center's landlord said Monday. Gmart signed a long-term lease on the 27,000-square-foot space last week, said Michael Jacoby, CEO of Bethesda-based Broad Street Realty, which leased the space. The center also has a Rite Aid and a Dollar Tree, and a Subway will open soon. “We think they are a good tenant for that community,” Jacoby said.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 14, 2006
On February 11, 2006, ANTOINETTE (nee Amonica), beloved wife of the late Mario Santoni and loving sister of Vera Chinquina, Mary Baranouskas, Amelia Headington and late Anna Miller and Messers Frank, Michael and Vincent Amonica. Also survived by many nieces, nephews, relatives and friends. Funeral Services at the family owned and operated JOSEPH N. ZANNINO, JR. FUNERAL HOME, 263 S. Conkling Street (at Gough), on Wednesday at 9 A.M. with Mass of Resurrection at Our Lady of Pompei Church at 10 A.M. Interment Holy Redeemer.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella | January 14, 2014
A sign outside the now vacant Santoni's Super Market in Highlandtown says Gmart International Foods, a six-store chain with two Maryland locations, is coming soon. But the shopping center's landlord said late Monday that no lease has yet been signed, and the company is negotiating with four or five grocers that are interested in moving in. "We've had a lot of interest and narrowed the list to four or five," including national and regional chains and smaller operators, said Michael Jacoby, CEO of Bethesda-based Broad Street Realty, which is leasing the space.
NEWS
January 18, 2004
On January 12, 2004, JOSEPHINE H. AND on February 8, 2000, DAVID A. SANTONI, devoted parents of Wayne, Dennis, David and Alessandra Santoni; also survived by eight grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. Memorial Services will be held at the family owned McCULLY-POLYNIAK FUNERAL HOME P.A., 3204 Mountain Rd. (Pasadena) on Saturday, January 24, 2004 at 3 P.M. Interment in the Wicomico Memorial Park Cemetery at a later date. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to the Salisbury Zoo, P.O. Box 2979, Salisbury, MD 21802.
BUSINESS
By Ellen James Martin | October 31, 1991
Valu Food Inc. says it wants to become a major supermarket player in the Baltimore area and, as part of its plan, will buy three new stores and shift to a local supplier.For $4.5 million, Valu Food will buy three supermarkets from Santoni's Inc. It will also move $40 million in business from its Pennsylvania supplier to Baltimore-based B. Green & Co., Valu Food announced yesterday."Our strategy is obviously to be a dominant supermarket factor in the region, and right now our growth is going to be concentrated around the Baltimore area," said Louis Denrich, Valu Food president.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | November 3, 1999
Republicans Robert N. Santoni Sr. and Joseph Brown Jr. were falling far short in early returns last night in their bids to become the first members of the GOP elected to the Baltimore City Council in 60 years.Santoni, president of a popular local grocery store founded by his father, was running a distant fourth behind three Democratic incumbents in Southeast Baltimore's 1st Councilmanic District.Brown, a bank manager active in the federal empowerment zone urban revitalization effort, was far behind three Democratic incumbents in the Southwest 6th District.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | October 21, 1999
Daniel Ellison's days as a footnote to Baltimore political history could be numbered.Ellison was the last Republican elected to the City Council -- in 1939. Three years after winning a fifth term representing the 4th District, he left the council to mount a successful campaign for Congress.In the 14 elections since, not one Republican council member has been elected in the overwhelmingly Democratic city.But this year, two GOP candidates are running well-financed, well-organized campaigns in an effort to end that six-decade record of futility in the Nov. 2 general election.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | March 26, 2003
An East Baltimore supermarket founded 73 years ago by an Italian immigrant is embarking on a $2.4 million expansion of its Highlandtown location that appears to have bagged the financial backing of the city and state. The city's Board of Estimates is to vote today on approving a $300,000 loan to Santoni's Super Market at East Lombard and South Eaton streets that would clear the way to completing additional bank and state loans needed to expand the store. "This is a major expansion and upgrade," said Chief Financial Officer Robert Santoni Jr., who is the third generation to run the store's operations.
NEWS
October 25, 1999
WiTH ITS 18 members -- plus a separately elected president -- Baltimore's City Council is an ordinary citizen's most direct link to municipal government. While the most important duties of the council concern fiscal, legislative and oversight matters, many taxpayers know their council representatives only as the persons to contact for filling potholes, planting trees or taking care of rodent and trash problems.Under the new mayor, the next council could play a bigger leadership role than during Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke's 12-year administration.
NEWS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2013
Santoni's Supermarket closed its doors on Tuesday after operating in Baltimore for 83 years. The Highlandtown store blamed its demise on the city's tax on bottled beverages, which more than doubled to 5 cents per bottle in July. The store said its sales dropped 18 percent since the tax was adopted in mid-2010, Santoni's said. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake disagreed that the tax was at fault, and said the revenue it generates will help build schools in the city. Another retailer may move into the vacated store located at 3800 E. Lombard St. "We are having discussions with a lot of promising prospects," said Rob Santoni Jr., the retailer's chief financial officer.
NEWS
October 22, 2013
Like the mayor, I'm no grocer, but I am nonetheless skeptical of owner Rob Santoni Jr.'s explanation of why he is closing his Highlandtown supermarket ( "Santoni's closing Highlandtown store," Oct. 13). To claim that the city's bottle tax is the sole reason for this decision raises a few questions: If beverage sales are such a big piece of the business, why didn't he grow volume in other areas, like real, healthy food, maybe even peas? Why did his family sell off the other 11 grocery stores over the last 80-some years and retain only one store, which apparently is over-dependent on a single product line (beverages)
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2013
When Santoni's announced last week that it was closing its remaining grocery store after more than 80 years in the business, the news sent something of a shiver through Michele Speaks-March. Not only did she grow up near the old Santoni's in Dundalk, she herself was doing what owner Rob Santoni said was no longer viable: run a small, family-owned grocery in the city. Santoni said the city's bottle tax is the sole reason for closing the Highlandtown grocery store his family opened in 1930 — it adds a nickel to the price of every bottle or can, something shoppers can easily avoid by driving a few extra miles and minutes over the county line.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2013
A second vendor has filed a lawsuit against Santoni's Supermarket, a Highlandtown institution that said earlier this week it will be forced to close because of Baltimore's bottled-beverage tax. G. Cefalu & Bro. Inc., a 100-year-old fruit and vegetable vendor based in Jessup, said in court documents filed Wednesday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore that the company delivered $203,198 worth of produce to Santoni's from June 1 to Sept. 23, all of which remains unpaid. The East Lombard Street grocer, founded in the early 1930s and which at one time had as many as a dozen locations, said Sunday that it will be forced to close at the end of the month.
NEWS
October 16, 2013
I am no economist but I fail to see why the bottle tax has been so disastrous to Santoni's Supermarket in Highlandtown while apparently sparing other city markets ( "Santoni's closing Highlandtown store," Oct. 13). (Make no mistake: My mobile friends loved Santoni's. Being on the less mobile side, I walk to Fresh and Green's when I need produce.) I have to ask if it could it possibly be that Santoni's has been charging more than its competitors for sodas and other items, leaving Mrs. Raven and Miss Oriole to load up on Santoni's hand-butchered meat and great pies and then, on the way home, swing by Safeway to fill up the car trunk with 7Up, Pepsi and the like - all on sale or cheaper, tax or no tax. And, yes, I am cynical, but did Santoni's lose money by giving transportation to low-income residents of city "food deserts" who wanted to peruse his expensive soda stocks?
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2013
Facing criticism from a struggling local business, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake defended the city's bottle tax Tuesday as essential to rebuilding Baltimore's schools. But the mayor acknowledged she would have to suspend a program that delivers fresh produce to poor neighborhoods because of the closing of the supermarket, Santoni's. Santoni's, an 83-year-old Highlandtown grocer, announced this week it would close its doors at the end of this month solely because of the city's bottled-beverage tax. Rob Santoni Jr., the company's chief financial officer, said he is in talks to bring in another supermarket and plans to run for a House of Delegates seat in Baltimore County to give small businesses a stronger voice in Annapolis.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | September 5, 1999
IT'S NOT THAT Bob Santoni is an impatient man, you understand. It's just that at the tender age of 55, he has little patience for certain things. The Republican businessman -- who's running for a City Council seat in the 1st District -- says Baltimoreans aren't getting their money's worth from the $7,400 the school system spends per student."
NEWS
November 26, 1995
Yolanda D. Santoni, 86, helped create supermarketsYolanda D. Santoni, who helped established an independent chain of Baltimore supermarkets and smaller markets, died of a stroke Wednesday at her Joppa residence. She was 86.Mrs. Santoni was married to the late Savino Santoni, who opened the first Santoni's store in 1930 with his brother, Terzo, in the rear of the family home at 119 S. Eaton St. in Highlandtown.Today, Santoni's has expanded to include three supermarkets in Highlandtown, Dundalk and Edgewood, with smaller stores in Glyndon, Rosedale and Abingdon.
NEWS
October 15, 2013
It is sad to hear that a local business, Santoni's Supermarket, will be closing after more than eight decades serving the people of southeast Baltimore ("Highlandtown Santoni's folds," Oct. 14). Not only are 80 people going to be out of jobs, but now another Baltimore neighborhood faces life in a food desert, all too common of a problem in our city. Santoni's has been in business since the tail end of the Great Depression, stayed in business through food rationing of World War II, though white flight of the '60's and '70's, and countless recessions, including the Great Recession of which some of the effects can still be felt.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.