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By New York Times News Service | November 30, 1994
Union Pacific Corp., once considered a long-shot spoiler in a bidding war to buy Santa Fe Pacific Corp., has emerged as the likely winner.Union Pacific won a crucial agreement yesterday from Santa Fe officials to meet for the first time to share financial information and discuss terms of a merger of the railroad companies.Santa Fe had been resisting such a meeting, saying that a lower offer of $3 billion from Burlington Northern Inc. was more attractive because it stood a better chance of being approved by federal regulators than Union Pacific's $3.2 billion offer.
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FEATURES
By Samantha Iacia, For The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2013
Date: July 26, 2013 Her story: Brandy Romadka, 31, grew up in Middle River. She is a speech therapist at Glendale Elementary in Glen Burnie. Her mother, Jody Romadka, lives in Chase. Her father, Bob Romadka, lives in White Marsh. His story: Jack Mitchell, 42, grew up in the Towson area and has lived in Lutherville for 19 years. He is funeral director and co-owner - along with his father, John Mitchell III - of Mitchell-Wiedefeld Funeral Home in Towson. The two also operate Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens in Timonium.
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BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | November 7, 1994
CHICAGO -- Many freight shippers who rely heavily on railroads have grave doubts about whether the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway, the object of a takeover battle, should be allowed to merge with anyone."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2012
Neila Block, a retired Baltimore County recreation center supervisor who had been a Pimlico Hotel hostess, died of lung disease March 30 at her daughter's home in Santa Fe, N.M. She was 82 and had lived in Randallstown and Mount Washington. Born Neila Beal in Minneapolis, she earned a degree in recreation from the University of Minnesota. She became a civilian employee of the Army and set up and managed military recreation centers in France and Germany in the 1950s. While working with the military, she met her future husband, Fred Block, a Hochschild Kohn department store buyer who later owned women's clothing stores, including the Fashion Post.
FEATURES
By Rick Sylvain and Rick Sylvain,Knight-Ridder News Service | November 14, 1993
Santa Fe, N.M., needs more publicity like its fiery chili needs more peppers.Which it doesn't.Word-of-mouth has brought millions of tourists to this mud-colored city of low adobe buildings -- home to artist's galleries, museums, ultra-chic boutiques, restaurants and stylish residences.Wrapped in rugged desert scenery studded with pinyon and juniper, Santa Fe wows so many tourists that lots of them stay.In a 1993 poll, Conde Nast Traveler readers voted Santa Fe their second favorite U.S. destination, and fifth favorite city worldwide -- tied with Paris and ahead of London and Rome.
FEATURES
By Christian Science Monitor | December 15, 1991
Nothing is more warming than Santa Fe's cuisine. A direct descendant of three cultures, Santa Fe cooking celebrates and blends the flavors of American Indian, Hispanic and Anglo history.The main industry here is the tourist trade, and catering to it are the city's many restaurants, ranging from the Baja Tacos stand, with its inexpensive and delicious tofu tamales, to moderately priced Tomasito's hearty fare to the high art of La Casa Sena or Santacafe.The foods of the region were discovered and cultivated by Indians: Pinon nuts, chilies, corn, tomatillos, tomatoes, cactus, black beans and pinto beans, many squashes, even potatoes are all New World contributions.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | December 10, 1996
SAN FRANCISCO -- Home-stake Mining Co. agreed to buy Santa Fe Pacific Gold Corp. for $2.3 billion in stock, topping last week's offer by Newmont Mining Corp. and setting the stage for a possible bidding war.Newmont spokesman Doug Hock said the Denver-based gold producer was deciding whether to respond to Homestake's $17.42-a-share bid for Santa Fe. On Thursday, Newmont made an unsolicited offer of $2 billion, or $15.68 a share, in an attempt to create North America's largest gold-mining company.
FEATURES
By Anne Z. Cooke and Steve Haggerty | January 12, 1992
The world -- sunlit snow, green pines and skiers gliding off the chairlift -- faded out, then swam back into focus."Are you all right?" asked a lean young man in black pants and a ski mask, popping his skis off and leaning over to check out the recumbent body -- my body -- on the snowbank. "You need to drink lots of liquids when you exercise at this altitude," he continued, pulling off the mask and proffering a water bottle.Fifteen years skiing in the Rockies, and I'd never felt queasy before.
FEATURES
By Alfred Borcover and Alfred Borcover,Chicago Tribune | November 8, 1992
SANTA FE -- Probably for the worse, the "City Different" is riding an unprecedented wave of popularity.For decades, New Mexico's historic capital has lured artists, writers, retirees and increasing numbers of tourists because of its adobe charm, high plains-mountain setting and Southwest ambience. The intense color of the land and sky, vividly captured by artist Georgia O'Keeffe and Hopi artist Dan Namingha; Hispanic and Indian traditions that have given the city a foreign flavor; and a lively contemporary arts scene contribute to Santa Fe's popularity.
FEATURES
By Molly Abraham and Molly Abraham,Knight-Ridder News Service | November 3, 1991
SANTA FE, N.M. -- Strings of bright red chilies hung out to dry -- ristras, they are called -- are everywhere in la Villa Real de la Santa Fe de San Francisco de Asis (the Royal City of the Holy Faith of St. Francis of Assisi), thankfully shortened to Santa Fe some years back.The fresh chilies are brilliant, slowly darkening to the leathery black of worn cowboy boots as they hang against sandy brown adobe walls. They hang beside the traditional turquoise blue trim around doorways and windows -- a color chosen because the Indians believed it kept away evil spirits.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | January 26, 2010
Donald Lee Keller, a retired IRS agent and a longtime Idlewylde resident, died Jan. 19 of cancer at his son's home in Santa Fe, N.M. He was 91. Mr. Keller was born in Baltimore and raised in East Baltimore and Govans. After graduating from Polytechnic Institute in 1938, he went to work as a tool maker at the old Glenn L. Martin Co. plant in Middle River. During World War II, Mr. Keller served as an infantryman with the 95th Infantry Division and fought at the Battle of the Bulge.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 4, 2005
SANTA FE, N.M. -- After pleading guilty to drunken driving, Joseph Tapia followed the judge's orders and showed up one night in November at a forum at Santa Fe Community College to hear from accident victims. The trouble was, Tapia appeared to be drunk. "He was making sounds, staggering and swaying as he stood in line, telling people to hurry up," Sgt. Joseph O'Brien, a Santa Fe County sheriff's deputy, told the sentencing judge, Magistrate Pat Casados, after tracking her down at home while Tapia, a 51-year-old suspended lawyer and repeat offender, stood in handcuffs.
NEWS
May 18, 2005
On May 10, 2005, JEROME La PIDES beloved husband of Allene La Pides (nee Roof), loving father of Ann Meisenheimer of PA, Jane La Pides of San Francisco, John La Pides of Annapolis, devoted grandfather of Jay and Elizabeth La Pides, Travis, Molly and Addie Cahen. Contributions may be made to the College of Santa Fe, Santa Fe, NM, 87501.
NEWS
April 1, 2005
NELSON SCHRETER of Sante Fe, NM, passed away suddenly on March 28, 2005. He is preceded in death by his parents Leon and Ruth Schreter. His sister, Susan and husband Mickey Warsaw and devoted life, long special friend Elane Stein survive Nelson. He is also survived by his nieces, Kimberly Warsaw and Stephanie Patton and their families. Nelson worked for more than thirty-five years for his family owned business; A. Schreter & Sons, a necktie manufacturing company in Baltimore, Maryland. At Nelson's request there will be no services.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 11, 2004
SANTA FE, N.M. - In a city that feels like a Neiman Marcus vision of the American West - there's a bar that sells a $42 margarita and stores where cowboy boots run in the four figures - the raging issue is a group of hourly employees whose wages are so low they would have to work the bulk of a day for that drink or more than a month for such footwear. A living-wage law that was supposed to take effect on New Year's Day would have raised the minimum pay here to one of the highest in the nation - $8.50 an hour.
NEWS
By Claire Whitcomb and Claire Whitcomb,Universal Press Syndicate | June 8, 2003
Here's a trip you won't want to pass up: an armchair journey to the land of the well-decorated. First stop: Catskills Country Style (Rizzoli, $50), written and photographed by Steve Gross and Sue Daley, who have spent the last 20-odd years roaming the world taking pictures for books and national decorating magazines. The Catskill Mountains and the magnificent stretch of the Hudson River they encompass are home to a number of national decorating treasures -- from Frederic Church's Moorish fantasy, Olana, to naturalist John Burroughs' humble cottage, Slabsides.
FEATURES
By Judy Folkenberg and Judy Folkenberg,Special to The Sun | November 20, 1994
Two roads connect Santa Fe to Taos: But take the road less traveled -- state Route 76. It will take you on a journey through an earlier time -- an era of ancient Indian pueblos, missionaries and Spanish settlers. This is the High Road or Mountain Road between Santa Fe and Taos.The road weaves through tiny adobe villages where centuries-old traditions persist. It cuts through the clean pine trees of the Carson National Forest, through fields of sweet-smelling sage and across high plateaus with spectacular views of the arid New Mexico landscape.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | December 12, 2001
WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Holdings Inc., the second-biggest U.S. cigarette maker, agreed yesterday to buy Santa Fe Natural Tobacco Co., a week after raising its offer to $340 million in cash to counter bids from Toronto-based Rothmans Inc. Rothmans said last week that Santa Fe's board likely would approve the R.J. Reynolds bid and that it wouldn't submit another offer. The purchase gives R.J. Reynolds, maker of Camel and Winston cigarettes, its first international brand since selling its overseas business to Japan Tobacco Inc. two years ago. Santa Fe's Natural American Spirit organic cigarettes provide R.J. Reynolds with a premium-priced brand whose sales are rising at a time when tobacco companies are fighting for fewer smokers in North America.
TRAVEL
By Michael Kilian and By Michael Kilian,Special to the Sun | February 9, 2003
It's called "the Gettysburg of the West," though few have ever heard of this westernmost of significant Civil War engagements. Many are unaware that there even was a major Civil War battle in the West, let alone one that might have changed the course of the conflict. The battlefield, near Pecos, N.M., lies some 25 miles southeast of Santa Fe, along a winding stretch of the old Santa Fe trail that cuts through a narrow, rocky canyon between the southern tip of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains and a huge prominence called Glorieta Mesa.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | August 13, 2002
SANTA FE - At an elevation of 7,000 feet, this town can't help but be a little rarefied. But each summer, when the Santa Fe Opera and Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival are in full flower, the place can reach even higher peaks. This year - the opera company's 46th season, ending Aug. 24; the chamber fest's 30th, ending next Monday - there is more than enough enticement for visitors (and locals). Not that anyone needs extra encouragement for a stop in Santa Fe. Despite increasing encroachment by the same old chain stores that fill every mall and shopping district in every burg from one coast to the other, this New Mexico town retains a great deal of vintage charm.
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