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Sankofa

NEWS
By WILEY A. HALL | December 23, 1993
This summer's hit movie, "Menace II Society," offered a bleak portrait of life in the inner city: the hopelessness and the anger and the despair; the self-destructive, kill-and-be-killed mentality of some young black men.Now comes a film with a very different vision. "Sankofa" has opened in virtual obscurity in Washington with a powerful, emotionally gut-wrenching portrait of slavery. There is anger and despair in this movie as well -- but, curiously, not the hopelessness. Somehow, the Africans in "Sankofa" carry themselves with greater dignity than the African- Americans in "Menace."
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NEWS
By Lois Szymanski and Lois Szymanski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 11, 1996
WHEN JOANN BENSON and her family saw a performance by Kibibi Ajanku and Kauna Mujamal this summer, she knew they had seen something special."We saw them perform this summer at a Carroll County public library cultural program, and I was impressed," Benson said of Sankofa Dance Theatre of Baltimore.So when Charles Carroll Elementary School, where Benson teaches music, was looking for a cultural program, Benson suggested Sankofa Dance Theatre.On Friday, the students at Charles Carroll were treated to African culture, presented in song, dance and folklore.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Linell Smith | January 25, 1996
The Maryland Historical Society has planned a day of events and a concert series to complement its exhibition "Sankofa & The Maryland Tradition."The Society will be host to an afternoon of music, storytelling and crafts demonstrations dedicated to the creative history of African-Americans in Maryland from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday.Events include Camay Calloway Murphy, Cab Calloway's daughter, reading "Can A Coal Scuttle Fly?" -- a children's book about Baltimore African-American artist Tom Miller -- and a dramatic portrayal of Maryland-born abolitionist Harriet Tubman.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | October 5, 1995
At the end of the 20th century, research and collecting in the field of African-American arts and crafts still has a long way to go. That's a major lesson to be learned from "Sankofa & theMaryland Tradition," an instructive but spotty two-part exhibit just opened at the Maryland Historical Society.One part, called "Sankofa" (after an African proverb meaning "retrieve the past to go forward") is devoted to selections from the collection of Derrick Joshua Beard, who has been collecting for less than a decade and yet has found pieces that originated from the Northeast to the far west.
NEWS
June 8, 1994
'Sankofa'We were recently fortunate enough to chance into the Charles Theater and see the movie, "Sankofa." After viewing this film, the assistant director informed us that it was made for under $1 million.This is important to note because, in light of the fanfare given the excellent and expensive "Schindler's List," we wondered why "Sankofa" is not generating the same media attention."Sankofa" is, overall, given its relatively low budget, a dramatization of a holocaust that warrants at least as much attention if not more, due to the sheer numbers of Africans forcibly spread throughout the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Crystal Williams | June 15, 2000
Illusion show Abracadabra, alakazam - You will take your children to the Ace of Hearts' "Abra-KID-Abra" magic show, Tuesday 10:30 a.m- 11:15 a.m. at Federal Hill Park. See magic tricks designed to entertain children and adults. Tricks use animals, props and children from the audience. The event is part of the Baltimore Office of Promotion's Kids' Stuff program. The magic show takes place on Warren Street across from the Inner Harbor's Rash Field. Admission is free. For more information, call 1-888-BALTIMORE . Dance theater You should be dancing!
NEWS
By Sherry Graham and Sherry Graham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 22, 1998
THE GIVING SPIRIT OF Christmas is flourishing at Oklahoma Road Middle School. Pupils at the Eldersburg school have been working to create a town scene dubbed Winter Wonderland.More than a dozen pupils in a group called the Partners Club have spent the past two weeks working on the display, which covers about 50 square feet. Pupils in the club spend time during their skills class working with pupils in teacher Lois Dolan's Learning for Independence class.I visited the Winter Wonderland display last week as the children were putting finishing touches on their work.
NEWS
January 20, 2002
WHEN ARNOLD Williams last week became the first African-American to chair the Baltimore Development Corp., his well-wishers at City Hall included some unusual investors - four leading pastors. They were there as the vanguard of divine capitalism, an emerging phenomenon that holds great promise for the city but may also lead to complicated political and tax problems. One of Mr. Williams' great challenges will be to balance the two - to harness the religious community's tremendous resources for the overall betterment of the city, but avoid the pitfalls that often come from mixing God with Mammon.
NEWS
By GINA DAVIS and GINA DAVIS,SUN REPORTER | April 16, 2006
As she squeezed a tube of paint onto the square ceramic tile to write out her plea for a more compassionate society, Veronica Armstrong had recent news events on her mind. "I wrote `Love one another' because there have been different situations, such as the boy whose mother died because the 911 operator didn't believe him and the Duke lacrosse controversy, that leave me with the sense that there's no love for one another," she said. With such a strong yearning in her heart, she said she felt compelled to design a tile for the mural that is being created on the campus of McDaniel College in Westminster as part of the school's annual Diversity Week.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | February 18, 1994
The lost voices of America belong to slaves. Of course in their time, no historians bothered with them because the prevailing theory held that history was made by generals and presidents. When the absurdity of this position became clear it was essentially too late, though a number of after-the-fact slave memoirs have been uncovered.Popular culture has fared no better in redressing this grievance. Too many examinations of slavery have turned out to be "Mandingo"-like pap hellbent on exploiting the sexual tensions implicit in institutionalized domination.
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